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Drake equation

Drake equation
The Drake equation is a probabilistic argument used to estimate the number of active, communicative extraterrestrial civilizations in the Milky Way galaxy. The equation was written in 1961 by Frank Drake not for purposes of quantifying the number of civilizations,[1] but intended as a way to stimulate scientific dialogue at the world's first SETI meeting, in Green Bank, West Virginia. The equation summarizes the main concepts which scientists must contemplate when considering the question of other radio-communicative life.[1] The Drake equation has proved controversial since several of its factors are currently unknown, and estimates of their values span a very wide range. This has led critics to label the equation a guesstimate, or even meaningless. History[edit] In September 1959, physicists Giuseppe Cocconi and Philip Morrison published an article in the journal Nature with the provocative title "Searching for Interstellar Communications The equation[edit] The Drake equation is: where: .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation

Related:  alien lifeScientists & Great Humankind contributors

Chariots of the Gods? Chariots of the Gods? Unsolved Mysteries of the Past (German: Erinnerungen an die Zukunft: Ungelöste Rätsel der Vergangenheit) is a book authored in 1968 by Erich von Däniken. It involves the hypothesis that the technologies and religions of many ancient civilizations were given to them by ancient astronauts who were welcomed as gods. Prior to publication, the book was extensively rewritten by its editor, Wilhelm Roggersdorf (a pen name of the German screenwriter Wilhelm "Utz" Utermann).[1][2][3] Content[edit] Hundreds of Proofs of God’s Existence NOTE: For real proofs of the nonexistence of any god, see "Why Atheism?" For other evidence, go to Atheists of Silicon Valley debate page . Hundreds of Proofs of God’s Existence

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Solway Firth Spaceman Jim Templeton's photograph. The Solway Firth Spaceman (also known as the Solway Spaceman and the Cumberland Spaceman) refers to a figure seen in a photograph taken in 1964 by firefighter, photographer and local historian Jim Templeton (13 February 1920 - 27 November 2011). The famous photo was taken on Burgh Marsh, situated near Burgh by Sands, overlooking the Solway Firth in Cumbria, England. Templeton claims the photograph shows a background figure wearing a space suit and has insisted that he did not see anyone present when the photograph was taken. The image was reproduced widely in contemporary newspapers[1] and gained the interest of ufologists.[2]

Murray-Hill riot The Murray-Hill riot (also known as "Montreal's 'night of terror'") was the culmination of 16 hours of unrest in Montreal, Quebec during a Montreal police strike. Police were motivated to strike because of difficult working conditions caused by disarming separatist-planted bombs and patrolling frequent protests. Montreal police also wanted higher pay, commensurate with police earnings in Toronto. As the police were on strike on October 7, 1969, a crowd of disgruntled taxi drivers congregated around the Murray-Hill garage in Griffintown, protesting against Murray-Hill’s monopoly at the Dorval International Airport. Attempts by the Sûreté du Québec to stop the procession towards the garage were stopped by striking Montreal policemen.

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