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How to Draw Eyes - Structure

How to Draw Eyes - Structure

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6-bCgRmcko

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100 Awesome Art Lessons on YouTube Whether you’re getting your bachelor’s degree in painting, graphic design or sculpture, there’s so much to learn about art — from its lush history to materials — that it can sometimes feel overwhelming. Yet art students shouldn’t fret. There’s a whole lifetime ahead to learn and numerous resources both in the classroom and outside of it for expanding your knowledge. One great place to seek out help with becoming a better artist is on YouTube.

How to Draw Eyes For a video version of this tutorial visit www.proko.com/how-to-draw-eyes-structure This tutorial is a continuation of How to Draw the Head from Any Angle. I will go over the structure of the eye and detailed information on drawing the brow ridge, eyeball, eyelids, eyelashes, iris, cornea, and pupil. The Basic Forms The Eyeball The part of the eyeball that is visible (technical term is Sclera) is commonly called the ‘white of the eye’. Realistic Portraits Tutorials So I was just going over the comments (I read every single one of them) and I saw a request for a tutorial on how to draw realistic wrinkles. It came from Bobbie – “shading is my hardest, and how to put wrinkles that don’t just look like lines” So, I’ve created this tutorial for you (and Bobbie ) on how to draw the wrinkles under the eye.

Social realism Social Realism, an international art movement, refers to the work of painters, printmakers, photographers and filmmakers who draw attention to the everyday conditions of the working classes and the poor, and who are critical of the social structures that maintain these conditions. While the movement's artistic styles vary from nation to nation, it almost always utilizes a form of descriptive or critical realism.[1] Social Realism should not to be confused with Socialist Realism, the official Soviet art form that was institutionalized by Joseph Stalin in 1934 and was later adopted by allied Communist parties worldwide.[1] Origins[edit] Social realist photography draws from the documentary traditions of the late 19th century, such as the work of Jacob A.

How to Draw Eyelashes Welcome back! And congratulation for making it this far into the series. Our drawing is almost complete! In this lesson, we will continue learning about drawing realistic eyes. We just have to add a few more details before we can do the final “unveiling”. Paper Mache Recipes This page contains recipes for several kinds of home-made paper mache paste, and home-made gesso recipes for finishing your sculptures. I have been messing around with paper mache for over 50 years and up until a few months ago I always came back to the easiest paper mache recipes, using plain old white flour and water paste with torn strips of newspaper. Now, however, I have abandoned the traditional layered paper process and use my new paper mache clay recipe and/or the even newer silky-smooth air-dry clay recipe for most my sculptures. However, for younger artists or for those who really don’t want to make the trip to the hardware store, these following recipes work just fine, and most of the tutorials on this site would work using these traditional paper mache recipes. Paper Mache Paste Recipes:

How to Draw Eyebrows Realistically Over the past few lessons I’ve told you about Pillar #1 & #2 of portrait drawing. In this lesson, we will cover Pillar #3: Capturing The Likeness Of The Portrait. Pillar #3 is all about getting all the subtle details of your portrait right so that when some one looks at your portrait, he/she will instantly recognize who you drew. Now the shading and drawing techniques that I’ve showed you in the previous lessons will help you to make your drawing much more accurate.

The ABC of Art Criticism: Some Recent How To’s It has often been said that writing about art is like dancing about architecture. Nearly as often, it has also then been said: But I’m going to do it anyway. Whether or not the dance analogy captures all the futilities and elations of the endeavor, writing about art, experience proves, is an activity unlikely to abate. Indeed, as art’s institutional and popular reach has grown ever more expansive in the early 21st century, the proliferation of adjunct written discourses has perhaps never been greater. When everyone is an artist, everyone is also eventually pressed into service as an art writer.

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