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4 Principals Of Digital Literacy

4 Principals Of Digital Literacy
Literacy Literacy is the ability to make sense of something, often generalized as the ability to read and write. In many ways, reading is reading, media is media, but in the same way a play places unique comprehension demands on a reader compared to a poem or a letter, so do digital media compared to classic media forms. In the 21st century, new literacies are emerging and digital media forms allow communication to be more nuanced than ever before. Digital Literacy Digital Literacy is about being able to make sense of digital media. 4 Principles Of Digital Literacy 1. The first principle of digital literacy is simply comprehension–the ability to extract implicit and explicit ideas from a media. 2. The second principle of digital literacy is interdependence–how one media form connects with another, whether potentially, metaphorically, ideally, or literally. 3. Sharing is no longer just a method of personal identity or distribution, but rather can create messages of its own. 4.

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Tips to Curb Online Cheating « Online Science Educator As the popularity of distance learning grows, there is a perception that cheating is more difficult to monitor than ever before. In the 2008 study, Cheating in the Digital Age: Do Students Cheat More in Online Courses?, students admitted they were nearly four-times more likely to cheat in online courses than live classes. While academic dishonesty may seem difficult to detect in a virtual classroom where instructors may never meet students face-to-face, there are methods instructors can use to try to keep students honest. Jennifer Sieszputowski, anatomy and physiology instructor at Kirtland Community College in Rosscommon, Michigan, uses LabPaqs in her courses and says she has noticed more online cheating in her distance learning classrooms in recent years.

Are Your Students Digitally Literate? 10 Resources Included in the Digital Tips Advent Calendar and part of the Effective Technology Integration category A computer does not substitute for judgment any more than a pencil substitutes for literacy. ~ Robert S McNamara Our learners live in a connected world where technology impacts their lives daily. 63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World 63 Things Every Student Should Know In A Digital World by Terry Heick It could be argued—and probably argued well—that what a student fundamentally needs to know today isn’t much different than what Tom Sawyer or Joan of Arc or Alexander the Great needed to know. Communication.

7 Ways to Create an Engaging Online Science Course « Online Science Educator 1.Introduce yourself and your course │ A creative and engaging way for your students to get to know you better is through an introduction video. Include background information about your experiences and interests along with a review of the syllabus.

14 brilliant quotes on remixing Art cannot be created or destroyed — only remixed. In a convincing talk from TEDGlobal 2012, director Kirby Ferguson explores the challenges of originality and freshness in a world where creativity takes root in what has come before. Without previous inventions we would not have the iPhone, the Model T Ford, Star Wars, Warhol’s soup cans, or the electronic musician Girl Talk. 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t mean we’re all suddenly omnipotent cyborgs, nor does it mean we’ve all become mindless social media addicts that spend our cognitive might tapping, swiping, and drooling on our smartphone and tablet screens. But just as the 19th century presented unique challenges to information processing than the 18th or 20th, the 21st century is different than the one before, or that the one that will come after. punyamishra.com recently released the following graphic that I thought was interesting, mainly in that it identified knowledge types for modern learning, settling on Foundational, Humanistic, and Meta Knowledge. 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student 1.

5 Creative Ideas for using Break-Out Rooms 65 Flares Twitter 7 Facebook 46 Google+ 5 LinkedIn 7 inShare7 65 Flares × Break Out of conformity, Unleash your Creativity, The walls are gone, Story-telling lives on!! What can you do with more than one room to teach in and why would you need it? If you think about collaborative learning or language games, you will soon get the bigger picture. I spent over a year experimenting with the Edupunk movement and we did a lot of creative collaborative work. However, there were times when I wished I could convert traditional offline language games into an online version. Exactly Where Did the Selfie Stick Come From? Oxford Dictionaries made “selfie” the word of the year in 2013. U.S. consumers responded by making the selfie stick the gift of the year in 2014. Around the U.S. this holiday season, camera shops, department stores and pharmacies have been having a hard time keeping up with demand for the selfie stick, a retractable pole that people clamp onto their smartphones to take better pictures of themselves. Nordstrom Inc. (JWN), which carried the Selfie On A Stick model in 118 stores starting in late November, said it had to reorder the item twice before Christmas and is currently sold out.

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout the Curriculum So how are we doing on the push to teach “digital literacy” across the K12 school spectrum? From my perspective as a school-based technology coach and history teacher, I’d say not as well as we might wish – in part because our traditional approach to curriculum and instruction wants to sort everything into its place. Digital literacy is defined as “the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate, and create information using a range of digital technologies.”

Four Videos on Instructional Design Using Games and Gamification for Employee Screening I was interviewed a while ago about the use of games and gamification within the employee selection process, here are some of the questions and responses. Can you give an example of a gamified hiring process? One example is to gamifiy the process of selection of people to work in the cyber security industry. So […] Continue Reading → Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to read and evaluate its level of accuracy, reliability and bias. When we recently assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of their responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility. They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective.

Connected Learning and Digital Literacy ~ Connectivism ~ A word which I’d never encountered before three weeks ago. A theory which is beginning to make sense to me. An area I’m growing my confidence in. This is my current understanding of what it means: Connectivism is the next evolution of the learning “-isms”: behaviourism, cognitivism, constructivism. 6 Favorite Teaching Online Activities by Lindsay Clandfield Our E-Moderation Course is coming up November 15th and will be taught by the international author and speaker, Lindsay Clandfield. Today's guest post features 6 of his favorite online activities which you can find in his book, Teaching Online! Photo by Flnz The following are my favourite six activities that I use regularly when teaching online courses. By online, I mean here that both myself and the students are doing the activity 100% online and at a distance from each other (not in a computer room together, or me using a connected IWB in class). 1 My window, my world

Curating versus Stealing One of the biggest compliments we can give to someone is to share their work. When someone writes a great post I share it on Twitter, post it on my Facebook wall, or share it out on Google+. Sometimes I even go old school and email it. I even have a dedicated page on my blog which called "Stolen Goods" where I share blogs that I think are valuable.

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