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Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act
The Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Pub.L. 111–203, H.R. 4173; commonly referred to as Dodd-Frank) was signed into federal law by President Barack Obama on July 21, 2010 at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, DC.[1] Passed as a response to the Great Recession, it brought the most significant changes to financial regulation in the United States since the regulatory reform that followed the Great Depression.[2][3][4] It made changes in the American financial regulatory environment that affect all federal financial regulatory agencies and almost every part of the nation's financial services industry.[5][6] As with other major financial reforms, a variety of critics have attacked the law, some arguing it was not enough to prevent another financial crisis or more "bail outs", and others arguing it went too far and unduly restricted financial institutions.[7] Origins and proposal[edit] Share in GDP of U.S. financial sector since 1860[9] Overview[edit] Duties[edit] Related:  EconomyFinancials

Browse BILLS Congressional Bills Congressional bills are legislative proposals from the House of Representatives and Senate within the United States Congress. There are six different types of bills. House bills (H.R.) and Senate bills (S.) require the approval of both chambers (ie House and Senate) and the signature of the President to become law. House Joint Resolutions (H.J. Res.) and Senate Joint Resolutions (S.J. House Concurrent Resolutions (H. House Simple Resolutions (H. Dodd–Frank Act Präsident Barack Obama (links) im Gespräch mit (von rechts) Chris Dodd, Richard Durbin und Barney Frank (17. Juni 2009) Der Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act („Dodd-Frank Act“) [1] ist ein US-amerikanisches Bundesgesetz , das als Reaktion auf die Finanzmarktkrise von 2007 das Finanzmarktrecht der Vereinigten Staaten umfassend ändert. Das Gesetz ist nach dem damaligen Vorsitzenden des Ausschusses für Banken, Wohnungs- und Städtebau des Senats , Chris Dodd , und dem damaligen Vorsitzenden des Ausschusses für Finanzdienstleistungen des Repräsentantenhauses , Barney Frank , benannt und wurde am 21. Juli 2010 durch die Unterzeichnung von Präsident Barack Obama verabschiedet. Überblick [ Bearbeiten ] Der vierte Titel des Gesetzes unterstellt Vermögensverwalter von nicht für den öffentlichen Vertrieb in den USA zugelassenen Anlagefonds (z.B. Der fünfte Titel des Gesetzes schafft innerhalb des Bundesfinanzministeriums, des U.S. Einzelnachweise [ Bearbeiten ]

Glass–Steagall Act The term Glass–Steagall Act usually refers to four provisions of the U.S. Banking Act of 1933 that limited commercial bank securities activities and affiliations within commercial banks and securities firms.[1] Congressional efforts to “repeal the Glass–Steagall Act” referred to those four provisions (and then usually to only the two provisions that restricted affiliations between commercial banks and securities firms).[2] Those efforts culminated in the 1999 Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA), which repealed the two provisions restricting affiliations between banks and securities firms.[3] [edit] The sponsors of both the Banking Act of 1933 and the Glass-Steagall Act of 1932 were southern Democrats: Senator Carter Glass of Virginia (who in 1932 had been in the House, Secretary of the Treasury, or in the Senate, for the preceding 30 years), and Representative Henry B. Steagall of Alabama (who had been in the House for the preceding 17 years). Legislative history of the Glass–Steagall Act[edit]

Value-at-Risk (VaR) EmailShare Value-at-risk (VaR) is a prob­a­bilis­tic met­ric of mar­ket risk (PMMR) used by banks and other or­ga­ni­za­tions to mon­i­tor risk in their trad­ing port­fo­lios. For a given prob­a­bil­ity and a given time hori­zon, value-at-risk in­di­cates an amount of money such that there is that prob­a­bil­ity of the port­fo­lio not los­ing more than that amount of money over that hori­zon. For ex­am­ple, if a port­fo­lio has a one-day 90% value-at-risk of USD 3.2 mil­lion, such a port­fo­lio would be ex­pected to not lose more than USD 3.2 mil­lion, nine days out of ten. Dif­fer­ent choices for the prob­a­bil­ity and time hori­zon cor­re­spond to dif­fer­ent value-at-risk met­rics. a time hori­zon—one trad­ing day in our ex­am­ple;a prob­a­bil­ity—90% in our ex­am­ple;a cur­rency—USD in our ex­am­ple. We name a value-at-risk met­ric by list­ing those three items fol­lowed by “VaR”, so the value-at-risk met­ric of our ex­am­ple is called one-day 90% USD VaR. Notes Ref­er­ences

Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Le Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act de 2010 est le principal volet législatif de la réforme du marché financier engagée par l'administration Obama suite à la crise des subprimes et la crise financière et économique qui s'en est ensuivie. Le titre complet de la loi, signée par le président Barack Obama le , explicite ses objectifs : « Une loi pour promouvoir la stabilité financière des États-Unis en améliorant l'accountability (la responsabilisation) et la transparence dans le système financier, pour mettre fin au too big to fail, pour protéger le contribuable américain en mettant fin aux sauvetages financiers (ending bailouts), pour protéger le consommateur des pratiques de services financiers abusifs, et pour d'autres objectifs. » Nom de la loi et vote[modifier | modifier le code] En juin 2009, l'administration Obama publia son projet de réforme des marchés financiers, le White Paper on Financial Regulatory Reform [1].

Glass–Steagall Act The term Glass–Steagall Act usually refers to four provisions of the U.S. Banking Act of 1933 that limited commercial bank securities activities and affiliations within commercial banks and securities firms.[1] Congressional efforts to “repeal the Glass–Steagall Act” referred to those four provisions (and then usually to only the two provisions that restricted affiliations between commercial banks and securities firms).[2] Those efforts culminated in the 1999 Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA), which repealed the two provisions restricting affiliations between banks and securities firms.[3] [edit] The sponsors of both the Banking Act of 1933 and the Glass-Steagall Act of 1932 were southern Democrats: Senator Carter Glass of Virginia (who in 1932 had been in the House, Secretary of the Treasury, or in the Senate, for the preceding 30 years), and Representative Henry B. Steagall of Alabama (who had been in the House for the preceding 17 years). Legislative history of the Glass–Steagall Act[edit]

Derivative (finance) Many money managers use derivatives for a variety of purposes, such as hedging — by taking a position in a derivative, losses on portfolio holdings may be minimized or offset by profits on the derivative. Likewise, derivatives can be used to gain quicker and more efficient access to markets; for example, it may be easier and quicker to purchase an S & P 500 futures contract than to invest in the underlying securities.[3] Derivatives are a contract between two parties that specify conditions (especially the dates, resulting values and definitions of the underlying variables, the parties' contractual obligations, and the notional amount) under which payments are to be made between the parties.[4][5] The most common underlying assets include commodities, stocks, bonds, interest rates and currencies, but they can also be other derivatives, which adds another layer of complexity to proper valuation. Still, even these scaled down figures represent huge amounts of money.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act 2002 View 13: Understanding the Dodd-Frank Act In July 2010, President Obama signed the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, also known as the Dodd-Frank Act. The reforms resulting from the act will certainly have an impact on both financial services and nonfinancial services companies across the United States. Touted as a bill that will completely overhaul the financial regulatory system, the Dodd-Frank Act creates new regulators, regulates new markets, brings new firms into the regulatory arena, and provides new rule-making and enforcement powers for existing agencies. The new financial regulatory architecture The Dodd-Frank Act will clearly have a significant impact on financial services firms, but it could also have an impact on nonfinancial services firms. Some parts of the Dodd-Frank Act will go into effect this year, while others will go into effect over the next several years.

Glass-Steagall Act Glass-Steagall Act ist die Bezeichnung für zwei Bundesgesetze der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika. Namensgeber dieser amerikanischen Bundesgesetze waren Senator Carter Glass aus Virginia und der Kongressabgeordnete Henry B. Steagall , beide von der Demokratischen Partei . Der erste Glass-Steagall Act (1932) [ Bearbeiten ] Das erste Gesetz wurde am 27. Februar 1932 von Präsident Herbert Hoover erlassen und diente der Eindämmung der Deflation während der Großen Depression . Der zweite Glass-Steagall Act (1933) [ Bearbeiten ] Das zweite, bedeutendere Gesetz, der Banking Act of 1933, wurde dem Repräsentantenhaus als H.R. 5661 durch Henry B. Durch den Bank Holding Company Act von 1956 wurden die zuvor beschriebenen Beschränkungen bestätigt und ergänzt. Siehe auch [ Bearbeiten ] Dodd–Frank Act Literatur [ Bearbeiten ] Benjamin Anderson: Economics and the Public Welfare . Weblinks [ Bearbeiten ] Deutschlandfunk, Essay und Diskurs , 9. Einzelnachweise [ Bearbeiten ]

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