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English literature: The Romantic Period

English literature: The Romantic Period
At the turn of the century, fired by ideas of personal and political liberty and of the energy and sublimity of the natural world, artists and intellectuals sought to break the bonds of 18th-century convention. Although the works of Jean Jacques Rousseau and William Godwin had great influence, the French Revolution and its aftermath had the strongest impact of all. In England initial support for the Revolution was primarily utopian and idealist, and when the French failed to live up to expectations, most English intellectuals renounced the Revolution. However, the romantic vision had taken forms other than political, and these developed apace. In Lyrical Ballads (1798 and 1800), a watershed in literary history, William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge presented and illustrated a liberating aesthetic: poetry should express, in genuine language, experience as filtered through personal emotion and imagination; the truest experience was to be found in nature. Related:  RomanticRomantic Period

About the Romantic Period The romantic period is a term applied to the literature of approximately the first third of the nineteenth century. During this time, literature began to move in channels that were not entirely new but were in strong contrast to the standard literary practice of the eighteenth century. How the word romantic came to be applied to this period is something of a puzzle. Originally the word was applied to the Latin or Roman dialects used in the Roman provinces, especially France, and to the stories written in these dialects. Romantic is a derivative of romant, which was borrowed from the French romaunt in the sixteenth century. At first it meant only "like the old romances" but gradually it began to carry a certain taint. The word passed from England to France and Germany late in the seventeenth century and became a critical term for certain poets who scorned and rejected the models of the past; they prided themselves on their freedom from eighteenth-century poetic codes.

Romancticism - Literature Periods & Movements Literature Network » Literary Periods » Romancticism No other period in English literature displays more variety in style, theme, and content than the Romantic Movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Furthermore, no period has been the topic of so much disagreement and confusion over its defining principles and aesthetics. Romanticism, then, can best be described as a large network of sometimes competing philosophies, agendas, and points of interest. In England, Romanticism had its greatest influence from the end of the eighteenth century up through about 1870. First and foremost, Romanticism is concerned with the individual more than with society. On the formal level, Romanticism witnessed a steady loosening of the rules of artistic expression that were pervasive during earlier times. Though struggling and unknown for the bulk of his life, poet and artist William Blake was certainly one of the most creative minds of his generation. Major Writers of the Romanticism Movement

Romanticism Alternative titles: Romantic movement; Romantic Style Romanticism, Britannica Classic: “The Spirit of Romanticism”Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.attitude or intellectual orientation that characterized many works of literature, painting, music, architecture, criticism, and historiography in Western civilization over a period from the late 18th to the mid-19th century. Romanticism can be seen as a rejection of the precepts of order, calm, harmony, balance, idealization, and rationality that typified Classicism in general and late 18th-century Neoclassicism in particular. It was also to some extent a reaction against the Enlightenment and against 18th-century rationalism and physical materialism in general. Romanticism emphasized the individual, the subjective, the irrational, the imaginative, the personal, the spontaneous, the emotional, the visionary, and the transcendental. ... (100 of 1,783 words)

Introduction to Romantic Prose: Overview of Authors and Works Romantic prose exists in novels, short stories and essays written during the Romantic period, specifically in England. The Romantic period lasted from about 1800 to 1840. Explore our library of over 30,000 lessons Click "next lesson" whenever you finish a lesson and quiz. You now have full access to our lessons and courses. You're 25% of the way through this course! Way to go! Congratulations on earning a badge for watching 10 videos but you've only scratched the surface. You've just earned a badge for watching 50 different lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 20 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 50 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 100 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 250 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 500 minutes of lessons. You have earned a badge for watching 1000 minutes of lessons.

Romanticism If the Enlightenment was a movement which started among a tiny elite and slowly spread to make its influence felt throughout society, Romanticism was more widespread both in its origins and influence. No other intellectual/artistic movement has had comparable variety, reach, and staying power since the end of the Middle Ages. Beginning in Germany and England in the 1770s, by the 1820s it had swept through Europe, conquering at last even its most stubborn foe, the French. It traveled quickly to the Western Hemisphere, and in its musical form has triumphed around the globe, so that from London to Boston to Mexico City to Tokyo to Vladivostok to Oslo, the most popular orchestral music in the world is that of the romantic era. After almost a century of being attacked by the academic and professional world of Western formal concert music, the style has reasserted itself as neoromanticism in the concert halls. Origins: Folklore and Popular Art Nationalism Shakespeare The Gothic Romance Medievalism

Famous people of the Romantic Period The Romantic period or Romantic era lasted from the end of the Eighteenth Century towards the mid 19th Century. Romanticism was a movement which highlighted the importance of: The individual emotions, feelings and expressions of artists.It rejected rigid forms and structures. Instead it placed great stress on the individual, unique experience of an artist / writer.Romanticism gave great value to nature, and an artists experience within nature. This was in stark contrast to the rapid industrialisation of society in the Nineteenth Century.Romanticism was considered idealistic – a belief in greater ideals than materialism and rationalism and the potential beauty of nature and mystical experience.Romanticism was influenced by the ideals of the French and American revolution, which sought to free man from a rigid autocratic society. Famous Romantic Poets William Blake (1757 –1827) Poet, artist and mystic. Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792 –1822) English romantic poet, and friend to John Keats.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Romantic Age: Introduction In a letter to Byron in 1816, Percy Shelley declared that the French Revolution was "the master theme of the epoch in which we live" — a judgment with which many of Shelley's contemporaries concurred. As one of this period's topics, "The French Revolution: Apocalyptic Expectations," demonstrates, intellectuals of the age were obsessed with the concept of violent and inclusive change in the human condition, and the writings of those we now consider the major Romantic poets cannot be understood, historically, without an awareness of the extent to which their distinctive concepts, plots, forms, and imagery were shaped first by the promise, then by the tragedy, of the great events in neighboring France. "The Gothic," another topic for this period, is also a prominent and distinctive element in the writings of the Romantic Age.

Prose-Writers of the Romantic Age | Learn English, IELTS, EFL,ESL Public Speaking, Grammar, Literature, Linguistics by NEO Though the Romantic period specialised in poetry, there also appeared a few prose-writers-Lamb, Hazlitt and De Quincey who rank very high. There was no revolt of the prose-writers against the eighteenth century comparable to that of the poets, but a change had taken place in the prose-style also. Whereas many eighteenth century prose-writers depended on assumptions about the suitability of various prose styles for various purposes which they shared with their relatively small but sophisticated public; writers in the Romantic period were rather more concerned with subject matter and emotional expression than with appropriate style. They wrote for an ever-increasing audience which was less homogeneous in its interest and education than that of their predecessors. There was also an indication of a growing distrust of the sharp distinction between matter and manner which was made in the eighteenth century, and of a Romantic preference for spontaneity rather than formality and contrivance.

The Romantic Era In 1789, William Lisle Bowles (1762-1850) wrote an influential sonnet sequence, Fourteen Sonnets, a sign of brighter times ahead for the form. As rational, witty, neoclassical seventeenth century poems written in heroic couplets gave way to major works in more open forms, the sonnet was somehow adapted to accommodate the literary values of this period. In many of these works one can sense the new worth placed on intuition and spontaneity. Second, perhaps, only to Shakespeare, William Wordsworth (1770-1850) is generally considered one of the greatest sonneteers. Among the well known poets of the Romantic period, John Keats (1795-1821) and Percy Shelley (1792-1822) wrote the sonnets most commonly anthologized--"Bright Star" and "Ozymandius", respectively. Here, perhaps even more than elsewhere, the chronological division of sonneteers is arbitrary, with Thomas Hood chosen as the Victorian to begin the next section.

Intro to American Romanticism American Romanticism (or the American Renaissance) Ann Woodlief's Introduction For many years, this period and these writers were known as the American Renaissance, a coin termed by F.O. Matthiessen in his book of that name in 1941. However, we will call this American romanticism, though it shares many characteristics with British romanticism. The glory years were 1850-1855. As is so often true, there are no good answers, but lots of good speculation. Politically the time was ripe. Economically America had never been wealthier. Religion, always a basic concern for Americans, was also ready for romanticism and its kind of pantheistic religion. Connected to this was the rise and professionalization of science, which seemed to many to conflict with religion. Aesthetically, the romantics were also in a state of revolt, primarily against the restraints of classicism and formalism. There were specifically American components to the romanticism of our authors. More on American Romanticism

Volume D: The Romantic Period | The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition: W. W. Norton StudySpace Volume D The Romantic Period 1785–1832 (NAEL Vol. D) The Romantic period is short, relative to other literary periods, but is still quite complex. Revolution and Reaction England at this time was transforming from a primarily agricultural nation to one focused on manufacture, trade, and industry. The New Poetries: Theory and Practice “The Romantics” did not actually identify themselves as such. Writing in the Marketplace and the Law Courts The number of people who could read, and who wanted to read, grew dramatically during the Romantic period, particularly among those of the lower and middle classes. Other Literary Forms Although the Romantic period centered primarily on poetry, many other literary forms flourished as well, including political pamphlets, reviews, drama, and novels.

Untitled Document By the late 18th century in France and Germany, literary taste began to turn from classical and neoclassical conventions. The generation of revolution and wars, of stress and upheaval had produced doubts on the security of the age of reason. Doubts and pessimism now challenged the hope and optimism of the 18th century. Men felt a deepened concern for the metaphysical problems of existence, death, and eternity. It was in this setting that Romanticism was born. Origins Romanticism was a literary movement that swept through virtually every country of Europe, the United States, and Latin America that lasted from about 1750 to 1870. The Romantic Style The term romantic first appeared in 18th-century English and originally meant "romancelike"-that is, resembling the fanciful character of medieval romances. Romanticism stresses on self-expression and individual uniqueness that does not lend itself to precise definition.

A Brief Guide to Romanticism “In spite of difference of soil and climate, of language and manners, of laws and customs, in spite of things silently gone out of mind and things violently destroyed, the Poet binds together by passion and knowledge the vast empire of human society, as it is spread over the whole earth, and over all time. The objects of the Poet’s thoughts are everywhere; though the eyes and senses of man are, it is true, his favorite guides, yet he will follow wheresoever he can find an atmosphere of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge—it is as immortal as the heart of man.”—William Wordsworth, “Preface to Lyrical Ballads" Romanticism was arguably the largest artistic movement of the late 1700s. Its influence was felt across continents and through every artistic discipline into the mid-nineteenth century, and many of its values and beliefs can still be seen in contemporary poetry. browse poets from this movement

The Romantic Period, 1820-1860: Essayists and Poets (The following article is taken from the U.S. Department of State publication, Outline of American Literature.) The Romantic Period, 1820-1860: Essayists and Poets By Kathryn VanSpanckeren The Romantic movement, which originated in Germany but quickly spread to England, France, and beyond, reached America around the year 1820, some 20 years after William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge had revolutionized English poetry by publishing Lyrical Ballads. Romantic ideas centered around art as inspiration, the spiritual and aesthetic dimension of nature, and metaphors of organic growth. For all men live by truth, and stand in need of expression. The development of the self became a major theme; self-awareness a primary method. As the unique, subjective self became important, so did the realm of psychology. Romanticism was affirmative and appropriate for most American poets and creative essayists. Unlike many European groups, the Transcendentalists never issued a manifesto. I'm Nobody!

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