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ECHELON

ECHELON
ECHELON[needs IPA], originally a code-name, is now used in global media and in popular culture to describe a signals intelligence (SIGINT) collection and analysis network operated on behalf of the five signatory nations to the UKUSA Security Agreement[1] — Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Referred to by a number of other abbreviations, including AUSCANNZUKUS[1] and Five Eyes,[2][3][4] it has also been described as the only software system which controls the download and dissemination of the intercept of commercial satellite trunk communications.[5] It was created in the early 1960s to monitor the military and diplomatic communications of the Soviet Union and its Eastern Bloc allies during the Cold War, and was formally established in the year of 1971.[6][7] §Name[edit] Britain's The Guardian newspaper summarized the capabilities of the ECHELON system as follows: §History[edit] §Origins (1960s–1970s)[edit] §Expansion (1980s)[edit] §Organization[edit] Related:  Through PRISM & Other PortsPrivacy

Ted Rall's Prescient Take On Verizon And The NSA Several months ago employees of Verizon, the company that enjoys a monopoly on local telephone service where I live, confirmed that my telephone has been tapped by the government.“I don’t mind that Bush is listening to my calls,” I told the security department. “It’s not like I’m calling al Qaeda. And if they called me, I wouldn’t be able to hear them because of the noise on the line.”Most Americans feel the same as me.

Main Core Main Core is the code name of a database maintained since the 1980s by the federal government of the United States. Main Core contains personal and financial data of millions of U.S. citizens believed to be threats to national security.[1] The data, which comes from the NSA, FBI, CIA, and other sources,[1] is collected and stored without warrants or court orders.[1] The database's name derives from the fact that it contains "copies of the 'main core' or essence of each item of intelligence information on Americans produced by the FBI and the other agencies of the U.S. intelligence community."[1] The Main Core database is believed to have originated with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in 1982, following Ronald Reagan's Continuity of Operations plan outlined in the National Security Directive (NSD) 69 / National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 55, entitled "Enduring National Leadership," implemented on September 14, 1982.[1][2] See also[edit] References[edit]

PRISM (surveillance program) Below are a number of slides released by Edward Snowden showing the operation and processes behind the PRISM program. It should be noted that the "FAA" referred to is Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act ("FAA"), and not the Federal Aviation Administration, which is more widely known by the same FAA initialism. Slide showing that much of the world's communications flow through the U.S. Details of information collected via PRISM Slide listing companies and the date that PRISM collection began Slide showing PRISM's tasking process Slide showing the PRISM collection dataflow Slide showing PRISM case numbers Slide showing the REPRISMFISA Web app Slide showing some PRISM targets. Slide fragment mentioning "upstream collection", FAA702, EO 12333, and references yahoo.com explicitly in the text. FAA702 Operations, and map FAA702 Operations, and map. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee Senator Rand Paul (R-KY)

Terrorist Living In U.S. Gets Why NSA Spying Such A Complicated Issue UNDISCLOSED—In the midst of the ongoing national debate over the recently revealed NSA surveillance of American citizens, a Yemeni al-Qaeda operative currently living covertly in the United States told reporters Tuesday that he totally understands why the issue is so incredibly complex and multifaceted. “Look, the fact of the matter is that in today’s world, there are people living in the United States who are aiming to injure and kill as many innocent Americans as they can, and if you’re the U.S. government then you really have to be vigilant about that stuff,” said the committed terrorist, adding that he can “totally sympathize” with the arguments both for and against the NSA's actions. “I think it's fair to say that surveillance of phone records and other contact information is the most effective way—and maybe the only effective way—to learn of these plots and prevent them. “Ultimately, there’s no answer to this that will leave everyone 100 percent satisfied,” the extremist said.

President's Surveillance Program Cover of the 10 July 2009 Unclassified Report on the President’s Surveillance Program The last presidential authorization expired on February 1, 2007, but some of the collection activities were continued, first under the authority of the Protect America Act of 2007, passed in August of that year, and then under the FISA Amendments Act (FAA), which was enacted in July 2008.[2] One part of the program was the Terrorist Surveillance Program, which authorized warrantless wiretapping of international communications where one party to the communication was believed to be affiliated with al-Qa'ida. The other activities have reportedly included data mining of e-mail messages[3] and telephone call detail records in the NSA call database.[4] The President's Surveillance Program activities were periodically reauthorized by the President, and were later transitioned to authority granted in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 Amendments Act of 2008. Background[edit]

Room 641A Coordinates: Room 641A is a telecommunication interception facility operated by AT&T for the U.S. National Security Agency that commenced operations in 2003 and was exposed in 2006.[1][2] §Description[edit] The existence of the room was revealed by former AT&T technician Mark Klein and was the subject of a 2006 class action lawsuit by the Electronic Frontier Foundation against AT&T.[5] Klein claims he was told that similar black rooms are operated at other facilities around the country. §Lawsuit[edit] The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) filed a class-action lawsuit against AT&T on January 31, 2006, accusing the telecommunication company of violating the law and the privacy of its customers by collaborating with the National Security Agency (NSA) in a massive, illegal program to wiretap and data-mine Americans' communications. §Gallery[edit] Page 17: Basic diagram of how the alleged wiretapping was accomplished. §See also[edit] §References[edit] §External links[edit]

NYC Bomb Plot Details Settle Little In NSA Debate WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration declassified a handful of details Tuesday that credited its PRISM Internet spying program with intercepting a key email that unraveled a 2009 terrorist plot in New York. The details, declassified by the director of national intelligence, were circulated on Capitol Hill as part of government efforts to tamp down criticism of two recently revealed National Security Agency surveillance programs. Najibullah Zazi's foiled plot to bomb the New York subways has become the centerpiece of that effort. In the rush to defend the surveillance programs, however, government officials have changed their stories and misstated key facts of the Zazi plot. The debate over the surveillance echoes one from years earlier, over President George W. "What is clear from this information released by the DNI is that each of these programs is authorized by law, overseen by Congress and the courts and subject to ongoing and rigorous oversight," said Sen. On Sunday, Sen.

NSA warrantless surveillance (2001–07) The NSA warrantless surveillance controversy ("warrantless wiretapping") concerns surveillance of persons within the United States during the collection of allegedly foreign intelligence by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) as part of the touted war on terror. Under this program, referred to by the Bush administration as the terrorist surveillance program,[1] part of the broader President's Surveillance Program, the NSA was authorized by executive order to monitor, without search warrants, the phone calls, Internet activity (Web, e-mail, etc.), text messaging, and other communication involving any party believed by the NSA to be outside the U.S., even if the other end of the communication lies within the U.S. However, it has been discovered that all U.S. communications have been digitally cloned by government agencies, in apparent violation of unreasonable search and seizure. On November 16, 2007, the three judges — M. In previous developments, the case ACLU v.

Utah Data Center The Utah Data Center area layout. The Utah Data Center, also known as the Intelligence Community Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative Data Center,[1] is a data storage facility for the United States Intelligence Community that is designed to store data estimated to be on the order of exabytes or larger.[2] Its purpose is to support the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI), though its precise mission is classified.[3] The National Security Agency (NSA) leads operations at the facility as the executive agent for the Director of National Intelligence.[4] It is located at Camp Williams near Bluffdale, Utah, between Utah Lake and Great Salt Lake and was completed in May 2014 at a cost of $1.5 billion.[5] According to an interview with Edward Snowden, the project was initially known as the Massive Data Repository within NSA, but was renamed to Mission Data Repository due to the former sounding too "creepy".[6] Purpose[edit] Structure[edit] See also[edit] Coordinates:

Pundits vs. Edward Snowden Edward Snowden Journalism attracts whistleblowers. In fact, some reporters need whistleblowers in order to do their jobs. But there are plenty of people working in the media who don't have much use for whistleblowers--and they've been having a field day going after NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Washington Post columnist Matt Miller (6/11/13) explained that "what Snowden exposed was not some rogue government-inside-the-government conspiracy. Or to put it another way, it's a program that's secret, that the nation's top spy lies to Congress about, and the Supreme Court refuses to review--because, being secret, no one can prove they're affected by it. Miller went on: Daniel Ellsberg says Snowden is a "hero." It's hard to imagine seeing Snowden sitting down with Sawyer anytime soon, but Miller's certainly not alone in speculating about Snowden's motives or psyche. David Brooks He elaborated: He betrayed the cause of open government. Everything about Edward Snowden is ridiculously cinematic.

Terrorist Surveillance Program The program was named the Terrorist Surveillance Program by the George W. Bush administration[3] in response to the NSA warrantless surveillance controversy following disclosure of the program. It is claimed that this program operated without the judicial oversight mandated by Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), and legal challenges to the program are currently undergoing judicial review. Because the technical specifics of the program have not been disclosed, it is unclear if the program is subject to FISA. It is unknown if this is the original name of the program; the term was first used publicly by President Bush in a speech on January 23, 2006.[4] On August 17, 2006, U.S. Even if the laws of surveillance are not always clear, the NSA still works to protect the country from terrorism. Basaaly Saeed Moalin was charged in 2013 with giving material support to an al-Queda cell based in Somalia named al-Shabaab. Description[edit] Pen register tap[edit] Call database[edit]

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