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Coursera Announces Details for Selling Certificates and Verifying Identities - Wired Campus

Coursera Announces Details for Selling Certificates and Verifying Identities - Wired Campus
How is a major provider of free online courses going to tell whether you are who you say you are? By how you type. The company, Coursera, plans to announce on Wednesday the start of a pilot project to check the identities of its students and offer “verified certificates” of completion, for a fee. A key part of that validation process will involve what Coursera officials call “keystroke biometrics”—analyzing each user’s pattern and rhythm of typing to serve as a kind of fingerprint. The company has long said that it planned to bring in revenue by charging a fee to students who complete courses and want to prove that achievement. What You Need to Know About MOOCs: A guide to The Chronicle’s coverage of massive open online courses. Coursera has decided to try to check IDs remotely, so that students can take tests from anywhere. The company’s verification system involves several steps: Can typing style serve as a reliable way to check identity? Setting the Price Ms. Return to Top Related:  MOOC Articles

California State U. Will Experiment With Offering Credit for MOOCs - Technology By Jeffrey R. Young State universities in California, looking for creative ways to reduce education costs at a time of budget stress, are turning to MOOCs to offer low-cost options for students. On Tuesday, San Jose State University announced an unusual pilot project with Udacity, a for-profit provider of the massive open online courses, to jointly create three introductory mathematics classes. The courses will be free online, but students who want credit from San Jose State will be able to take them for just $150, far less than the $450 to $750 that students would typically pay for a credit-bearing course. If the project continues beyond the pilot, the university will keep 51 percent of any revenue after costs are covered and Udacity will keep 49 percent, said Mohammad Qayoumi, president of the university, in an interview on Monday. The governor, a Democrat, said at the news conference that student debt is a "huge problem" and that "online is a part of that solution." Mr.

Peering Into Learning The aim of the Peeragogy Handbook is to establish effective peer-learning techniques that you can implement “on the ground.” We suggest that you look through the Handbook, try a few of these suggestions, and see how they work for you. Then we invite you share your experiences, ask for feedback, and work with us to improve the Handbook and the field we affectionately call “Peeragogy.”In this part of the Peeragogy Handbook, we “peeragogues” have summarised the most important and applicable research and insights from two years of inquiry and discussion. Although there’s been no shortage of experimentation and formal research into collaborative, connective, and shared learning systems in the past, there is a new rumbling among education thinkers that suggests that when combined with new platforms and technologies, peer-learning strategies as described here could have a huge impact on the way educational institutions evolve in the future. The interplay of individual and group References

What You Need to Know About MOOC's - Technology We'll be updating this page regularly.Please check back for updates. Call it the year of the mega-class. Colleges and professors have rushed to try a new form of online teaching known as MOOCs—short for "massive open online courses." The courses raise questions about the future of teaching, the value of a degree, and the effect technology will have on how colleges operate. If you'd like to learn more about MOOCs in a condensed format, try reading "Beyond the MOOC Hype: A Guide to Higher Education's High-Tech Disruption," a new e-book by The Chronicle's technology editor. What are MOOCs? MOOCs are classes that are taught online to large numbers of students, with minimal involvement by professors. Why all the hype? Advocates of MOOCs have big ambitions, and that makes some college leaders nervous. These are like OpenCourseWare projects, right? Sort of. So if you take tests, do you get credit? So far there aren't any colleges that offer credit for their MOOCs. Who are the major players? edX Udemy

12 Principles Of Mobile Learning 12 Principles Of Mobile Learning by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated and republished from a 2012 post Mobile Learning is about self-actuated personalization. As learning practices and technology tools change, mobile learning itself will continue to evolve. It is only within these communities that the native context of each learner can be fully understood. 1. A mobile learning environment is about access to content, peers, experts, portfolio artifacts, credible sources, and previous thinking on relevant topics. 2. As mobile learning is a blend of the digital and physical, diverse metrics (i.e., measures) of understanding and “performance of knowledge” will be available. 3. The cloud is the enabler of “smart” mobility. 4. Transparency is the natural byproduct of connectivity, mobility, and collaboration. 5. Play is one of the primary characteristics of authentic, progressive learning, both a cause and effect of an engaged mind. 6. 7. 8. With mobility comes diversity. 9. 10.

Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2012: MOOCs Part 5 of my Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2012 series The Year of the MOOC Massive Open Online Courses. And oh man, did we talk about it. In retrospect, it’s not surprising that 2012 was dominated by MOOCs as the trend started to really pick up in late 2011 with the huge enrollment in the three computer science courses that Stanford offered for free online during the Fall semester, along with the announcement of MITx in December. Who cares what Cormier thinks and predicts? January: Googler and Stanford professor (and professor for the university’s massive AI class) Sebastian Thrun announces he’s leaving Stanford to launch Udacity, his own online learning startup. February: MITx opens for enrollment. April: Stanford professors Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller (also involved with Stanford’s fall 2011 MOOCs) officially launch their online learning startup Coursera. May: June: July: August: September: October: The University of Texas system joins edX.Coursera strikes a deal with Antioch University. November:

Building a professional learning network on Twitter January 12, 2013 by tomwhitby For those who do not know, here are two basic Twitter principles: 1. If you only follow 10 people you will only see the general tweets of those 10 people. 2. If only 10 people follow you, only those 10 people will see your general tweets. Although some might argue that the right ten people might be enough, I would argue that ten educators is a very limited Professional Learning Network. The never-ending task of building a PLN is to continually follow really good educators to get the information they put out. I often say that the worst advocates for using Twitter as a PLN are power users. Building a professional Learning Network consisting of quality educators, who responsibly share quality information and sources, takes time and requires a plan. How do you find those quality educators to follow in order to add value to your PLN? The very best sources for good people to follow on Twitter are the best people you already follow. Hashtags add range to Tweets.

Google's Open Course Builder: A Giant Leap into 21st Century Online Learning "Google's mission is to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful." -- About Google Google is the most powerful nonhuman teacher ever known to actual humans. Implicitly and ceaselessly, Google performs formative assessments by collecting the following data: the content, genre and media that interests you most; when and for how long you access your external cloud brain; what your hobbies and routines are; with whom you work and communicate; who will get your November vote; and whether you prefer invigorating clean mint or enamel renewal toothpaste. By continuously refining the nuance of your sociogram, Google has already customized your next web exploration and taught itself to teach. You Are Now Entering the Learning Management System If you are an advanced geek, you will be able to author and publish your own e-learning space using Open Course Builder. With his gray beard and soothing demeanor, Senior Research Scientist Daniel M. Credit: Google

7 Fun Ways to Use QR Codes In Education QR Codes Quick Response are so fun to integrate in classroom. Quick Response codes are bar codes with information. QR Codes can include contact information, websites, text, SMS, pictures and so much more. Here are some ways to Integrate QR Codes in Your Lessons 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Quick Response Codes are so easy to create. Try it…your kids will love it! How to Succeed in a Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) by Apostolos Koutropoulos & Rebecca J. Hogue “MOOCs provide a new methodology and modality for teaching and learning. This newness does pose some problems for learners, but also provides for exciting new possibilities. MOOCs require learners to be more proactive in their education and in building their personal learning networks (PLNs). In the past couple of years, massive online open courses (MOOCs) have become a trend among many members of the educational online community. The course Connectivism and Connective Knowledge (CCK), by Stephen Downes, has been offered at least three times since 2008, and additional MOOCs have been offered that cater to a variety of learning topics including digital storytelling, mobile learning (mLearning), learning analytics, the future of education, and instructional ideas for online success, just to name a few. The structure and design of each MOOC varies. Learners who are new to MOOCs, and who are not familiar with self-directed learning, often struggle to find their place within a MOOC.

Seven steps to vocabulary learning You might expect that, after having been exposed to a word in ten, twenty, or maybe at the very most thirty, contexts, a learner will gradually piece together the word's meaning and start to use it correctly, appropriately and fluently. Classroom context Seven steps to vocabulary learning Conclusion Classroom context Of course we cannot expect a learner to acquire difficult words in the same way as a young child acquires their first language, but, perhaps as teacher we can somehow help learners to arouse their 'learning monitor' by, for example, providing rich contexts containing the target language and by giving our learners time to reflect on what the language item means. In this way teachers can use the EFL classroom to replicate the real world and nurture strategies to help students understand and produce difficult language items which often seem beyond their grasp. Seven steps to vocabulary learning Here are some practical steps that I have used to help my students. Paul Bress

Open Online Courses: Higher Education of the Future? - Techonomy By Eric Rabkin One instructor’s firsthand look behind the scenes of the movement offering online education to the masses. I am “teaching” a MOOC, one of those massive, open, online courses through which Coursera and, more recently, edX offer people around the globe challenging learning experiences through a simple internet connection: video mini-lectures, machine-graded problem sets in some courses, peer-evaluated essays in others, discussion boards, and more. I would guess that in forty-two years of on-campus teaching at the University of Michigan I have worked with between 12,000 and 20,000 students. As soon as most humanities colleagues hear about this course, their first response is, “Good luck grading all those essays.” Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller reports in her TED lecture on MOOCs that, with this many students, when an issue is raised on a forum, the mean time to someone else on the forum contributing a useful response is 22 minutes. These people also educate me.

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