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RPi SD cards

RPi SD cards
SD cards The SD card is a key part of the Raspberry Pi; it provides the initial storage for the Operating System and files. Storage can be extended through many types of USB connected peripherals. When the Raspberry Pi is 'switched on', i.e. connected to a power supply, a special piece of code called the bootloader is executed, which reads more special code from the SD card that is used to start up the Raspberry Pi. If there is no SD card inserted, it will not start. Do NOT push in or pull out an SD card while the Raspberry Pi is connected to the power, as this is likely to corrupt the SD card data (you might get away with it, but it is best not to). The SD card must be formatted, or written to, in a special way that means the Raspberry Pi can read the data it needs to start properly. One advantage to using an SD card like this is that you can have several SD cards, each with a different operating system, or a different purpose. Which SD card? SD cards come in a range of storage sizes.

http://elinux.org/RPi_SD_cards

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Arduino vs. Raspberry Pi vs. CubieBoard vs. Gooseberry vs. APC Rock vs. OLinuXino vs. Hackberry A10 A long time ago, Earth was ruled by dinosaurs. Then they died and we began to play with Motorola HC11. These were prehistoric times, when debugging involved an oscilloscope.

Setting up a VM for Raspberry Pi development using Virtualbox, Scratchbox2 & qemu (Part 1) « Executing Gummiworms Last week I released version 0.2 of the Raspberry Pi development VM and I thought that I could safely call it a day because in a few weeks the Raspberry Pi hardware will be available and therefore we will no longer need the VM for software development. So yesterday I announced on this blog and the Raspberry Pi forums that I had decided to EOL the VM and would no longer be updating it as I didn't see the need and i'm not going to have the time to maintain it for the next few months as it takes about 12 to 14 hours to create, configure and upload, 8 to 10 hours of that is uploading using all my upstream bandwidth which is no longer feasible for me to do again until after June. However, almost immediately after posting that I started to receive tweets and PM's asking me not to stop working on the VM or to at least write detailed instructions on how to create your own VM for Raspberry Pi (or other ARM based devices) from scratch.

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ModMyPi case covers the $35 Raspberry Pi PC for about $13 The Rasbperry Pi is a full-fledged computer which you can buy for about $35. It has a processor, memory, USB and Ethernet ports. But one thing the RaspBerry Pi doesn’t have is a protective case. It’s basically a system-on-a-board and not much else.

Ultrasonic Distance Measurement Using Python – Part 1 LEDs, buzzers and switches are the most common items people attempt to interface to their Raspberry Pi’s. Something I found in eBay that is a little bit different is an ultrasonic measurement module. This allows you to measure the distance to the nearest wall or solid object. The modules are easy to buy, cheap and relatively straight forward to interface to the GPIO header. So here is some information on my experiments with an Ultrasonic measurement module and Python.

Programming Raspberry Pi Nearly all of the fuss about the low-cost Raspberry Pi computer's hardware has died down and we finally have some details of its software that is easy enough for the rest of us to follow. So what can you do with it out of the box? Dr Eben Upton, founder of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, has just posted some easy-to-follow details of how to get started programming the Raspberry Pi. s Raspberry Pi Lesson 6. Using SSH In this lesson you will learn how to remote control your Raspberry Pi over your local network using Secure Shell (SSH). A common reason for remote controlling your Pi from another computer is that you may be using your Pi solely to control some electronics and therefore not need a keyboard, mouse and monitor, other than for setting it up. It also can just save on desktop clutter, and the problem of having multiple keyboards and mice all over the place.

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