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NSA Spying

NSA Spying
The US government, with assistance from major telecommunications carriers including AT&T, has engaged in massive, illegal dragnet surveillance of the domestic communications and communications records of millions of ordinary Americans since at least 2001. Since this was first reported on by the press and discovered by the public in late 2005, EFF has been at the forefront of the effort to stop it and bring government surveillance programs back within the law and the Constitution. History of NSA Spying Information since 2005 (See EFF’s full timeline of events here) News reports in December 2005 first revealed that the National Security Agency (NSA) has been intercepting Americans’ phone calls and Internet communications. Those news reports, combined with a USA Today story in May 2006 and the statements of several members of Congress, revealed that the NSA is also receiving wholesale copies of American's telephone and other communications records. EFF Fights Back in the Courts

https://www.eff.org/nsa-spying

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N.S.A. Dragnet Included Allies, Aid Groups and Business Elite While the names of some political and diplomatic leaders have previously emerged as targets, the newly disclosed intelligence documents provide a much fuller portrait of the spies’ sweeping interests in more than 60 countries. Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters, working closely with the National Security Agency, monitored the communications of senior European Union officials, foreign leaders including African heads of state and sometimes their family members, directors of United Nations and other relief programs, and officials overseeing oil and finance ministries, according to the documents. In addition to Israel, some targets involved close allies like France and Germany, where tensions have already erupted over recent revelations about spying by the N.S.A. Details of the surveillance are described in documents from the N.S.A. and Britain’s eavesdropping agency, known as GCHQ, dating from 2008 to 2011. It is unclear what the eavesdroppers gleaned.

Rep. Jack Kingston Proposes That Poor Students Sweep Floors In Exchange For Lunch WASHINGTON -- Rep. Jack Kingston (R-Ga.) wants kids to learn early in life that there's no such thing as a free lunch. To make sure they absorb that lesson, he's proposing that low-income children do some manual labor in exchange for their subsidized meals. On Saturday, Kingston, who is vying to be his party's nominee in Georgia's Senate race next year, spoke at a meeting of the Jackson County Republican Party about the federal school lunch program. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter Block Tool For Cops To Surveil You On Social Media On Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of California announced that, after the organization obtained revealing documents through public records access requests, Facebook and Instagram have cut off data access to a company that sells surveillance products for law enforcement. Twitter has also curbed the surveillance product’s access. The product, called Geofeedia, is used by law enforcement to monitor social media on a large scale, and relies on social media sites’ APIs or other means of access.

Inside TAO: The NSA's Shadow Network The insert method and other variants of QUANTUM are closely linked to a shadow network operated by the NSA alongside the Internet, with its own, well-hidden infrastructure comprised of "covert" routers and servers. It appears the NSA also incorporates routers and servers from non-NSA networks into its covert network by infecting these networks with "implants" that then allow the government hackers to control the computers remotely. (Click here to read a related article on the NSA's "implants".) In this way, the intelligence service seeks to identify and track its targets based on their digital footprints. These identifiers could include certain email addresses or website cookies set on a person's computer. Of course, a cookie doesn't automatically identify a person, but it can if it includes additional information like an email address.

Ted Cruz isn't far from the only Tea Party nut. There's plenty more of them It's instructive to remember that when the Tea Party first began to gather steam, the name referred to a "party" in the celebration sense – the Boston Tea Party, specifically: an event of planned chaos, a protest that masqueraded as an Indian attack. Over time, the name has lost its punny puckishness much as the movement has steadily shifted from a proudly anacharical – even populist – response and rebellion within the GOP to a smoothly functioning alternative to it. The government shutdown proved that attempts by the GOP establishment to co-opt the Tea Party as a source of energy just created a network of political sleeper agents. With its own mechanism for drafting (and supporting) candidates, its own agenda, and its own media eco-system, the Tea Party is a third party by almost any criteria but ballot affiliation – and leadership. For when that happens: here's a look at some of the Tea Party's once and perhaps future leaders. Most likely to succeed: Sarah Palin.

Edward Snowden Calls Police Spying on Quebec Journalists a ‘Threat to Democracy’ In a speech to 600 people at McGill University in Montreal on Wednesday night, Edward Snowden described police spying on Quebec journalists a “threat to the traditional model of our democracy.” Though it had been announced months ago, the timing of Snowden’s conference was strangely appropriate. The event took place just hours after La Presse revealed the Sûreté du Québec (SQ), which is the provincial police force, had put at least six prominent journalists under surveillance. Two days earlier, the same Montreal daily had broken the story that its own star columnist, Patrick Lagacé, had been spied on by the Montreal police force (SPVM). Appearing live from Russia, where he’s been living in exile since exposing top secret information about US intelligence and surveillance programs, Snowden did not mince words when discussing the behaviour of Quebec police. "You can find out anyone he met with, who did he call, how long he was on the phone"

NSA Surveillance Lawsuit Tracker A federal appeals court recently ruled that the National Security Agency's bulk collection of Americans' phone records is illegal. The case was based on a lawsuit brought by the ACLU, and it's just one of many challenges to to government surveillance and secrecy. Here's a rundown of key suits. Are we missing any important cases? Email us or leave a comment below. Correction: An earlier version of this post said an ACLU FOIA suit was combined with a New York Times FOIA suit, and both lost in federal court.

'Judge Me On My Record,' Says David Cameron. So We Did... "I want to be judged," David Cameron told Andrew Marr on his Sunday show. "I'm very happy to be judged on the record that I have as Prime Minister over the last five years." Alright then, Dave... (Created by David Schneider, Andrea Mann and David Beresford) Meet the machines that steal your phone’s data The National Security Agency’s spying tactics are being intensely scrutinized following the recent leaks of secret documents. However, the NSA isn't the only US government agency using controversial surveillance methods. Monitoring citizens' cell phones without their knowledge is a booming business. From Arizona to California, Florida to Texas, state and federal authorities have been quietly investing millions of dollars acquiring clandestine mobile phone surveillance equipment in the past decade. Earlier this year, a covert tool called the “Stingray” that can gather data from hundreds of phones over targeted areas attracted international attention. Rights groups alleged that its use could be unlawful.

NSA revelations: the 'middle ground' everyone should be talking about As if there wasn't already enough NSA mass surveillance to worry about, last week we got a peek at the agency's arsenal of tools for exploiting the hardware and software of its targets. They're best described as a veritable SpyMall catalog of sophisticated concealed gadgets and surreptitious software "implants", each sneakier than the last in its ability to compromise and extract private data from the computers and phones on which they're installed. If you still thought there was anywhere in the electronic world to hide after you're in their sights, this should be enough to disabuse you of that notion once and for all. This lies atop six months of news of the myriad ways our metadata and, in some cases, our content, is being routinely collected and analyzed, cloud services and communications providers being compromised, and security standards that should be protecting us being sabotaged.

How's Obamacare Turning Out? Great If You Live in a Blue State, and 'Screw You' If You Have a Republican Governor Photo Credit: Andy Dean Photography/ Shutterstock.com May 25, 2013 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. Obamacare implementation is becoming the latest dividing line between blue- and red-state America, with Democrat-led states making progress to expand healthcare to the uninsured and the poor—and Republican-led states saying "screw you" to millions of their most vulnerable and needy residents. CameraV: Secure Verifiable Photo & Video Camera – Guardian Project CameraV is the easiest way to capture and share verifiable photos and video proof on a smartphone or tablet, all the while keeping it entirely secure and private. This is the official app from the InformaCam project, a partnership between the Guardian Project and WITNESS. CameraV is easy to learn and simple to use (and insanely secure & powerful under the covers…). All photos and videos you take are password-protected and 100% encrypted on your device.

NSA planted bugs at Indian missions in D.C., U.N. Two of the most important nerve-centres of Indian diplomacy outside the country — the Permanent Mission of India at the United Nations and the embassy in Washington, DC — were targets of such sophisticated bugs implanted by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) that entire computer hard disks might have been copied by the American agency. The U.N. Mission building in New York and the embassy premises, including its annex, in Washington were on a top-secret list of countries and missions — many of them European allies of the U.S. — chosen for intensive spying. According to a top-secret NSA document obtained by The Hindu, the NSA selected India’s U.N. office and the embassy as “location target” for infiltrating their computers and telephones with hi-tech bugs, which might have given them access to vast quantities of Internet traffic, e-mails, telephone and office conversations and even official documents stored digitally.

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