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Our Secret Universe

Our Secret Universe
Related:  BIOGeneral Biology

Scientists Make Progress in Tailor-Made Organs Two and a half years ago doctors in Iceland, where Mr. Beyene was studying to be an engineer, discovered a golf-ball-size growing into his windpipe. Despite surgery and radiation, it kept growing. In the spring of 2011, when Mr. Beyene came to Sweden to see another doctor, he was practically out of options. “I was almost dead,” he said. But the doctor, Paolo Macchiarini, at the Karolinska Institute here, had a radical idea. Implanting such a “bioartificial” organ would be a first-of-its-kind procedure for the field of regenerative medicine, which for decades has been promising a future of ready-made replacement organs — livers, kidneys, even hearts — built in the laboratory. For the most part that future has remained a science-fiction fantasy. “The human body is so beautiful, I’m convinced we must use it in the most proper way,” said Dr. So far, only a few organs have been made and transplanted, and they are relatively simple, hollow ones — like bladders and Mr. In Mr. Imitating Nature

The Biology Project Microbial Factories The world is alight with algae fever. In this age of deep ecological design aspirations, the range of speculative design projects based on algae technology is growing. Algae are imagined to provide a whole range of solutions, from energy-producing architectural towers, to lights, burgers, skin care products, animal feed, drug factories and bioplastics. Algae, simple photosynthetic plants that live in water, are among some of the oldest living organisms on earth. Indeed, the ability of algae to fix carbon is such that they’ve become the technology of choice for carbon capture.

EnergyDrinksLesson.pdf Print me some skin WASHINGTON, DC: At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington D.C., U.S. researchers described a process by which skin grafts can be printed using standard ink-jet cartridges. Instead of ink, the cartridges contain skin or cartilage cells suspended in a bio-gel solution. The process entails 3D scanning an injury to create a precise model of the affected area and then printing the graft from the patient’s donor skin. Currently in pre-clinical trials, the project will receive $50 million from the US Defense Department to develop a portable bioprinter for use on the battlefield, where it could print compatible skin directly over a severe burn in less than an hour. Also at the AAAS conference, Cornell University engineer Hod Lipson demonstrated a similar bio-printing process by producing a human ear.

How does caffeine affect the body? Biologist Neal J. Smatresk--Dean of the College of Science at the University of Texas at Arlington--offers this explanation: Caffeine--the drug that gives coffee and cola its kick--has a number of physiological effects. Historically, cAMP was the first second messenger ever described. Thus, when caffeine stops the breakdown of cAMP, its effects are prolonged, and the response throughout the body is effectively amplified. Caffeine would be expected to have this effect on any animals that used these neurotransmitters to regulate their heartbeat. Researchers Demonstrate Reliable DNA Data Storage in Work Published in Nature DNA could someday store more than just the blueprints for life—it could also house vast collections of documents, music, or video in an impossibly compact format that lasts for thousands of years. Researchers at the European Bioinformatics Institute in Hinxton, U.K., have demonstrated a new method for reliably encoding several common computer file formats this way. As the price of sequencing and synthesizing DNA continues to drop, the researchers estimate, this biological storage medium will be competitive within the next few decades. The information storage density of DNA is at least a thousand times greater than that of existing media, but until recently the cost of DNA synthesis was too high for the technology to be anything more than a curiosity. Conventional methods of storing digital information for prolonged periods continue to pose problems, however. The magnetic tapes typically used for archival storage become brittle and lose their coating after a few decades.

How do you cite website material that has no author, no year, and no page numbers? Because the material does not include page numbers, you can include any of the following in the text to cite the quotation (from pp. 170–171 of the Publication Manual): A paragraph number, if provided; alternatively, you could count paragraphs down from the beginning of the document. An overarching heading plus a paragraph number within that section. A short title in quotation marks, in cases in which the heading is too unwieldy to cite in full. Because there is no date and no author, your text citation would include the title (or short title) "n.d." for no date, and paragraph number (e.g., "Heuristic," n.d., para. 1). The entry in the reference list might look something like this: Heuristic. (adapted from the sixth edition of the APA Publication Manual, © 2010) Because the material does not include page numbers, you can include any of the following in the text to cite the quotation (from pp. 170–171 of the Publication Manual): Heuristic. Heuristic.

DIY BioPrinter We started out by messing around with an old inkjet printer that we literally saved from a sidewalk somewhere. There's already plenty of interesting things you can do with an low-end off-the-shelf inkjet printer, but they do have some limitations, which we'll get into in the next Step (or skip straight to Step 3 for how we built our own bioprinter from scratch, that you can see in the first picture above). Undressing the Printer We disassembled an abandoned HP 5150 inkjet printer for use as a bioprinter. There's a little momentary switch that senses whether the cover is open. There's also a momentary switch inside the paper handling mechanism that senses whether paper has been loaded. Once you've got your printer all undressed, and figured out how to activate the cover-closed switch - print something! Cartridges Prep Next task is prying open an ink cartridges, so you can fill them with something more interesting. Alternatively, you can cut off the lid using your favorite power tool.

Writing in Psychology: Experimental Report Writing Summary: Written for undergraduate students and new graduate students in psychology (experimental), this handout provides information on writing in psychology and on experimental report and experimental article writing. Contributors:Dana Lynn Driscoll, Aleksandra KasztalskaLast Edited: 2013-03-11 09:54:55 Experimental reports (also known as "lab reports") are reports of empirical research conducted by their authors. You should think of an experimental report as a "story" of your research in which you lead your readers through your experiment. As you are telling this story, you are crafting an argument about both the validity and reliability of your research, what your results mean, and how they fit into other previous work. These next two sections provide an overview of the experimental report in APA format. General-specific-general format Experimental reports follow a general to specific to general pattern. Title page Experimental reports in APA format have a title page. Crafting your story

DNA 'perfect for digital storage' 23 January 2013Last updated at 13:03 ET By Jonathan Amos Science correspondent, BBC News Nick Goldman says DNA is a robust and fantastically dense storage medium Scientists have given another eloquent demonstration of how DNA could be used to archive digital data. The UK team encoded a scholarly paper, a photo, Shakespeare's sonnets and a portion of Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream speech in artificially produced segments of the "life molecule". The information was then read back out with 100% accuracy. It is possible to store huge volumes of data in DNA for thousands of years, the researchers write in Nature magazine. They acknowledge that the costs involved in synthesizing the molecule in the lab make this type of information storage "breathtakingly expensive" at the moment, but argue that newer, faster technologies will soon make it much more affordable, especially for long-term archiving. "If you keep it cold, dry and dark - DNA lasts for a very long time.

How the kidney works Each kidney contains about a million tiny structures called nephrons. A nephron has a cup-shaped Bowman's capsule leading into the renal tubule. The two sections of each nephron extend across the two different regions of the kidney: the Bowman's capsules are found within the outer cortex regionthe renal tubules run from the cortex into the darker medulla How does the kidney balance the blood? Placed end to end, the nephrons of one kidney would stretch about 8 km. A branch of the renal artery supplies the nephrons with blood. Sea urchin nickel 'trick' could be key to capturing carbon 4 February 2013Last updated at 21:57 ET By Matt McGrath Environment correspondent, BBC News A close up of the skeleton of a sea urchin which could help capture and store carbon Researchers say that the natural ability of sea urchins to absorb CO2 could be a model for an effective carbon capture and storage system. Newcastle University scientists discovered by chance that urchins use the metal nickel to turn carbon dioxide into shell. They say the technique can be harnessed to turn emissions from power plants into the harmless calcium carbonate. The research is in the journal, Catalysis Science and Technology. Continue reading the main story The beauty of a nickel catalyst is that it carries on working regardless of the pH....It is also very cheap, a thousand times cheaper than carbon anhydrase” End QuoteGaurav BhaduriNewcastle University Many sea creatures convert carbon dioxide in the waters into calcium carbonate which is essentially chalk. Bubbling under

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