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The False Promise of the Education Revolution - College, Reinvented

By Scott Carlson and Goldie Blumenstyk Last year, leading lights in for-profit and nonprofit higher education convened in Washington for a conference on private-sector innovation in the industry. The national conversation about dysfunction and disruption in higher education was just heating up, and panelists from start-ups, banking, government, and education waxed enthusiastic about the ways that a traditional college education could be torn down and rebuilt—and about how lots of money could be made along the way. During a break, one panelist—a banker who lines up financing for education companies, and who had talked about meeting consumer demands in the market—made chitchat. The banker had a daughter who wanted a master's in education and was deciding between a traditional college and a start-up that offered a program she would attend mostly online—exactly the kind of thing everyone at the conference was touting. Read beneath the headlines a bit. A 'Mass Psychosis' Unfortunately, Mr.

http://chronicle.com/article/The-False-Promise-of-the/136305/

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What is the theory that underpins our moocs? If you’re even casually aware of what is happening in higher education, you’ve likely heard of massive open online courses (MOOCs). They have been covered by NY Times, Chronicle of Higher Education, TV programs, newspapers, and a mess or blogs. While MOOCs have been around since at least 2008, the landscape has changed dramatically over the past 10 months. In this timeframe, close to $100 million has been invested in corporate (Udacity) and university (EDx and Coursera) MOOCs . And hundreds of thousands of students have signed up and taken these online course offerings.

Higher education: our MP3 is the mooc Fifteen years ago, a research group called The Fraunhofer Institute announced a new digital format for compressing movie files. This wasn't a terribly momentous invention, but it did have one interesting side-effect: Fraunhofer also had to figure out how to compress the soundtrack. The result was the Motion Picture Experts Group Format 1, Audio Layer III, a format you know and love, though only by its acronym, MP3. The recording industry concluded this new format would be no threat, because quality mattered most. Who would listen to an MP3 when they could buy a better-sounding CD?

Kids’ apps and ebooks can’t teach them to read without parent and teacher support. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images As touchscreen tablets become the hot holiday gift for children—even for tots still learning to walk and talk—parents can be forgiven for feeling a little confused and skeptical about this new trend, especially when it comes to claims about education. The iTunes App Store boasts more than 700,000 apps and, as the Joan Ganz Cooney Center discovered earlier this year, nearly 80 percent of the top-selling paid apps in the education category are aimed at children. Many of these apps make claims about helping children learn to read. It’s an alluring promise—but are they all they are cracked up to be?

CourseBuilderChecklist - course-builder - Checklist of all steps to create a course using Course Builder. - Course Builder Costs When you use Course Builder, you create your course as an App Engine application. Currently, each App Engine application can consume a certain level of computing resources for free, controlled by a set of limits. If you need resources above these free limits, you can switch to a paid app to set a daily resource budget. Clay Shirky is our MP3 Dear Clay, Please stop being wrong about the future of Higher Education. It’s embarrassing, and it is damaging to those of us who actually work in the field and care about it. But first up, could you stop being wrong about the record industry. The pattern of a newer, low quality format supplanting an old one is not an unusual experience for them . Cassette tapes were a lower quality than vinyl.

Comment réinventer l’éducation avec le numérique ? At this year’s Futur en Seine digital festival in Paris, Econocom presented the “classroom of the future” , a four-day workshop where visitors could experiment with digital text books, digital whiteboards and tablets, technology which is set to revolutionise teaching as we know it all over the world. Yet the central question remains how to use this new technology to impart knowledge? How to use digital tools to reinvent teaching methods and better address both teachers and students’ needs? Flip teaching Flip teaching or a flipped classroom is a form of blended learning in which students learn new content online by watching video lectures, usually at home, and what used to be homework (assigned problems) is now done in class with teachers offering more personalized guidance and interaction with students, instead of lecturing. This is also known as backwards classroom, flipped classroom, reverse teaching, and the Thayer Method."[1][2][3] Traditional vs flipped teaching[edit] The traditional pattern of teaching has been to assign students to read textbooks and work on problem sets outside school, while listening to lectures and taking tests in class.

This could be huge... Moocs are already big - in reach and in hype - and are predicted to explode. Zoë Corbyn checks in to learn if they are more than just a novelty and to find out what it’s like to teach a class of 38,000 Kristin Sainani, clinical assistant professor in health policy at Stanford University, has just finished teaching her most popular course ever. But its popularity was far beyond the scale of a class of several hundred students, with seminar rooms and lecture theatres bursting at the seams. The take-up was off the charts.

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