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Welcome to the English for Uni Website!

Welcome to the English for Uni Website!
This free website is for teachers and learners of English as an additional language, from intermediate levels upwards (i.e. approximately IELTS 6 and above). The site aims to make difficult grammar and academic writing concepts easier to understand. Please use this site as often as you like. You can also download all the explanations and exercises in pdf format. The site has a Creative Commons license, which means that anyone can use the materials anywhere in the world. On this site you can learn more about: There is also information for speakers and learners of Japanese, Chinese, French and Indonesian. All the sections of this website have video stories, explanations and exercises. Ms Parrot and Harumi Kaga spoke to the world-famous linguist Professor David Crystal in Germany in 2014. Come and join us on the website, and learn more about English grammar! We hope you enjoy using the website. Visit the English for Uni blog to share your grammar questions and answers.

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/english-for-uni/

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Grammar Bytes! Grammar Instruction with Attitude Grammar Instruction with Attitude Home • Terms • Exercises • MOOC • Handouts • Presentations • Videos • Rules • About • Shop • Feedback ©1997 - 2017 by Robin L. How to End an Email You’ve worked to make your email clear, and you’ve carefully edited to streamline your writing. The body of your email might well be perfect, but it can all go awry if you use the wrong sign-off. It’s just a word or a short phrase, followed by your signature, and yet finding the right tone to close your email often requires a surprising amount of thought and finesse. When you’re struggling with how to end an email, it’s best to consider the context. Grammar These OWL resources will help you use correct grammar in your writing. This area includes resources on grammar topics, such as count and noncount nouns, articles (a versus an), subject-verb agreement, and prepositions. Grammar-related exercises can be found here.

Synonyms for the 96 most commonly used words in English Amazing — incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger — enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry — mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed

List of 100 Adverbs Developing a list of 100 adverbs may be difficult since the adverb is one of the very most absolutely, positively, completely, totally and truly confused parts of speech in the English language. You see, adverbs are often confused with adjectives. It's a relatively simple mistake to make, as both adjectives and adverbs describe things. This article will give you a list of 100 adverbs plus a brief summary of the difference between adverbs and adjectives. Basic Adverbs This list of 100 adverbs can also be useful when understanding what an adverb is and how to identify one:

Explaining English Grammar Acknowledgments Preface 1 Introduction Overview Basic Forms - On terminology - On being ungrammatical - On good English Basic meanings - 'I am more interesting in English Grammar' - Why can I say 'I shot the sheriff', but not *'I smiled the sheriff'? - Linguistic distance Meanings in context - Discussion topics and projects - Teaching ideas - Further reading Exercises at Grammar Bytes! Terms of Use You may not alter, sell, or post these materials on a different server. Photocopying for students or linking to materials here does not require my permission. 33 ways to speak better English If you’re reading this, I imagine you want to communicate with confidence and competence in English. When we communicate effectively we are able to express our ideas and opinions, share experiences, and build relationships with others. When we struggle to express ourselves, we feel unvalued and insecure. As human beings, we want to participate in group discussions and have an impact on the society around us. In the modern world, we communicate across borders.

HyperGrammar Welcome to HyperGrammar electronic grammar course at the University of Ottawa's Writing Centre. This course covers approximately the same ground as our English department's ENG 1320 Grammar course. The content of HyperGrammar is the result of the collaborative work of the four instructors who were teaching the course in Fall 1993: Heather MacFadyen, David Megginson, Frances Peck, and Dorothy Turner. David Megginson was then responsible for editing the grammar and exercises and for converting them to SGML. This package is designed to allow users a great deal of freedom and creativity as they read about grammar.

Grammar. De Montfort This section enables you to focus on grammar awareness. By using the term 'grammar' we mean the placing of words in a certain order, with the correct endings, and linked together in a way that makes grammatical sense. Remember, the Centre for Learning and Study Support (CLaSS) can also help you to develop your academic writing. CyberGrammar Homepage

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