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Silent Spring

Silent Spring is an environmental science book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin on September 27, 1962.[1] The book documented the detrimental effects on the environment—particularly on birds—of the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. In the late 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring (1962), which brought environmental concerns to the American public. Silent Spring was met with fierce opposition by chemical companies, but it spurred a reversal in national pesticide policy, led to a nationwide ban on DDT for agricultural uses,[2] and inspired an environmental movement that led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.[3][4] Research and writing[edit] Content[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_Spring

Related:  Earth ParadigmJustice/ Sustainability Books20th century environmentVaccine$ Ebola Zika

Deep ecology Deep ecology is a contemporary ecological and environmental philosophy characterized by its advocacy of the inherent worth of living beings regardless of their instrumental utility to human needs, and advocacy for a radical restructuring of modern human societies in accordance with such ideas. Deep ecology argues that the natural world is a subtle balance of complex inter-relationships in which the existence of organisms is dependent on the existence of others within ecosystems.[1] Human interference with or destruction of the natural world poses a threat therefore not only to humans but to all organisms constituting the natural order. Deep ecology's core principle is the belief that the living environment as a whole should be respected and regarded as having certain inalienable legal rights to live and flourish, independent of their utilitarian instrumental benefits for human use. Principles[edit]

Nature’s matrix: Linking agriculture, conservation and food sovereignty An important book argues that conservationists who focus on creating nature preserves are undermining their own cause. To truly protect biodiversity, environmentalists must support the global struggle of peasant farmers for human rights, land, and sustainable agriculture. NATURE’S MATRIX Linking Agriculture, Conservation and Food Sovereignty by Ivette Perfecto,John Vandermeer,and Angus Wright Earthscan, 2009 Ozone Depletion Information, Ozone Depletion Facts, Ozone Layer, Ozone Hole - National Geographic The ozone layer is a belt of naturally occurring ozone gas that sits 9.3 to 18.6 miles (15 to 30 kilometers) above Earth and serves as a shield from the harmful ultraviolet B radiation emitted by the sun. Ozone is a highly reactive molecule that contains three oxygen atoms. It is constantly being formed and broken down in the high atmosphere, 6.2 to 31 miles (10 to 50 kilometers) above Earth, in the region called the stratosphere. Today, there is widespread concern that the ozone layer is deteriorating due to the release of pollution containing the chemicals chlorine and bromine. Such deterioration allows large amounts of ultraviolet B rays to reach Earth, which can cause skin cancer and cataracts in humans and harm animals as well.

Zika vaccine efficacy trials could start in 2017 In the most optimistic scenario, a Zika vaccine could prove its worth by the start of 2018, Anthony Fauci, head of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, said today. NIAID plans to begin tests of a vaccine made in its labs in September in 80 people, said Fauci, who spoke at a press conference held at a meeting on Zika virus risk communication challenges in Washington, D.C. If the vaccine proves safe and capable of stimulating relevant immune responses, he said NIAID plans in the first quarter of 2017 to launch what he called a phase 2b study “in a country that has a very high rate of infection.” That study would enroll thousands of volunteers.

Mobile Apps for Exploring Nature This post appears courtesy of SciStarter, a blog and online resource for citizen scientists. I often get sidetracked after using the W-A-L-K word out loud in front of my dog. Sometimes, I am looking for misplaced sneakers or sunglasses, but today I am downloading a few citizen science apps to my iPhone in hopes of turning our midday walk into an urban naturalist adventure. Mila, a fluffy herding mix, sits at attention, impatiently staring at me with her “didn’t you say we were going for a walk?” expression as I poke at the phone and the app icons appear on the screen.

The One-Straw Revolution Masanobu Fukuoka (1913-2008) was a farmer and philosopher who was born and raised on the Japanese island of Shikoku. He studied plant pathology and spent several years working as a customs inspector in Yokohama. While working there, at the age of 25, he had an inspiration that changed his life. He decided to quit his job, return to his home village and put his ideas into practice by applying them to agriculture. Over the next 65 years he worked to develop a system of natural farming that demonstrated the insight he was given as a young man, believing that it could be of great benefit to the world.

What is the Ozone Layer and How Does it Affect Us? Author: Susan Hunt MA - Updated: 26 October 2014| Comment The easiest way to come to grips with the Ozone Layer is to imagine the earth's atmosphere as a layered cake.Our atmosphere is split into a number of layers, beginning with the "troposphere" which is where we all live. Above that is the "stratosphere", which is where most planes fly and in there, you'll also find the planet's Ozone Layer. DDT DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) is a colorless, crystalline, tasteless and almost odorless organochloride known for its insecticidal properties and environmental impacts. DDT has been formulated in multiple forms, including solutions in xylene or petroleum distillates, emulsifiable concentrates, water-wettable powders, granules, aerosols, smoke candles and charges for vaporizers and lotions.[7][8] First synthesized in 1874, DDT's insecticidal action was discovered by the Swiss chemist Paul Hermann Müller in 1939. It was used in the second half of World War II to control malaria and typhus among civilians and troops.

Gaia hypothesis The study of planetary habitability is partly based upon extrapolation from knowledge of the Earth's conditions, as the Earth is the only planet currently known to harbour life The Gaia hypothesis, also known as Gaia theory or Gaia principle, proposes that organisms interact with their inorganic surroundings on Earth to form a self-regulating, complex system that contributes to maintaining the conditions for life on the planet. Topics of interest include how the biosphere and the evolution of life forms affect the stability of global temperature, ocean salinity, oxygen in the atmosphere and other environmental variables that affect the habitability of Earth. Introduction[edit]

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things One of the most influential recent books on design and environmentalism.” —Alice Rawsthorn, The New York Times [McDonough] point[s] to a path out of the seemingly un-winnable trench war between conservation and commerce.” —James Surowiecki, The New Yorker

Stockholm: Birth of the green generation 4 June 2012Last updated at 17:00 ET Stockholm was the first UN summit to feature, even welcome, groups from civil society Stockholm, 1972. Five years after the Summer of Love, four after the Paris riots; the Cold War is in full swing. Ingredients Used in Pesticide Products Development of DDT DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) was developed as the first of the modern synthetic insecticides in the 1940s. It was initially used with great effect to combat malaria, typhus, and the other insect-borne human diseases among both military and civilian populations.

List of environmental organizations This is a list of the more notable environmental organizations by organization type (intergovernmental, governmental or non-governmental) and further subdivided by country. Intergovernmental organizations[edit] Worldwide[edit] Regional[edit] Local governments[edit]

Charles Eisenstein Subscribe to Charles Newsletter Connect on Facebook Read Online Welcome to the HTML version of Sacred Economics. The full version is here in English, along with full and partial translations into other languages.

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