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The Top 100 ‘Pictures of the Day’ for 2012

Dec 11, 2012 After the positive reception from last year’s Top 50 ‘Pictures of the Day’ for 2011, the Sifter promised to highlight the top 25 ‘Pictures of the Day‘ at the end of every quarter, eventually culminating in an epic Top 100 for 2012. That time has come! Below are the top 100 POTDs for 2012. *Please note the photographs themselves were not necessarily taken in 2012, they just happened to be featured as a POTD this year. Enjoy! COPYRIGHT© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Related:  interesting thingsArtysyn Photos

Copyright Awareness Week Articles VISUAL ART CASES - DERIVATIVES Intro by Monica Corton Slide Notes by Nancy Wolff, Esq. A person who creates a copyrightable work has not only the right to protect the original work, but also the right to protect and control any works that are variations on the original work. These variations are called "derivative works" and they include making modifications, adaptations or other new uses of a work, or translating the work to another media. Therefore, if you find a work that you like, for example a photograph or sculpture, you cannot simply change it to another media (i.e., a painting) and call it your own. You need to include a credit to the original creator and identify your source for obtaining the original work. The following slides include four legal cases that have to do with derivative works issues in the visual arts. SLIDE 1 NOTES: Koons v. SLIDE 2 NOTES Jack Leigh v. These expressive elements all make the pictures more effective. SLIDE 3 Sahuc v. SLIDE 4 Mannion v.

Journeys - Yosemite National Park - What Adams Saw Through His Lens - Travel And then you’re there. Pale, curvaceous granite rocks dance in the skyline. Dozens of people stand along the edge of the pull-off, called Tunnel View, trying to capture the scene. Some snap two quick shots with disposable yellow cameras, and others set up their tripods for hours, watching the light strike Yosemite’s monoliths. Many people know these sights by name, but more know them by sight alone, as captured through the lens of the legendary American photographer . Adams first visited Yosemite in 1916 when he was 14 years old. The park itself also remained a favorite. The first step on an Ansel Adams-inspired trip to Yosemite is to visit the gallery run by his family. I ordered three books written by Adams from the gallery’s Web site before my trip: Adams’s autobiography, his collected photos of Yosemite and a step-by-step explanation of some of his works called “Examples: The Making of 40 Photographs.” Back in 1986, Mr. Once a week, Mr. “We’re a gallery,” Mr.

The world's most awesome igloo. Pegman vs. Clippy. SCORE 141 Clever wall art. SCORE 125 When the queen shows up to your wedding. When doctors become teachers. Horn mustaches. My 2 cats are quite special. Wabi Sabi - a Japanese Cultural Aesthetic BLU Collage, 2003 Wabi Sabi, an aesthetic concept intimately related to Japan and Zen Buddhism, is a way of perceiving things. "...the Japanese cultural source of this law of continual, cyclical evolution and decay parallels the British cultural mood of determination, stubbornness and pride which mandates a belief in improvement during times of hardship." (1) Wabi Sabi is a aesthetic concept intimately related to Japan and Zen Buddhism. However, it is not a "style of art" but rather a way of perceiving things, a very refined culture of things imperfect, impermanent and incomplete that expresses itself in great freedom of form, sublime colors, and a simplicity. Things of wabi-sabi nature are understated and unassuming, yet they do have presence and quiet authority and describe the transience and solitude of existence, an existential loneliness and tender sadness, in short: the essence of Zen. Historically: "Sen no Rikyu desired to learn The Way of Tea. Personally: Book on Wabi Sabi Links:

The Creative Process of Ansel Adams Revealed in 1958 Documentary Today marks what would be the 111th birthday of Ansel Adams, the American photographer who captured the sublime power of the wilderness, taking iconic images of the American West, most notably in Yosemite Valley. (See photo gallery here.) Original footage documenting the creative life of Ansel Adams is surprisingly hard to come by online. So A/V Geeks and Develop Tube did us all a favor when they revived this 1958 documentary revealing Adams’ technical approach to photography, the cameras and related gear he carried to the field, and his thoughts on the artistic horizons of photography. Ansel Adams, Photographer (1958) is available at YouTube and Archive.org. It will now appear in our collection of Free Documentaries, a subset of our meta collection, 1,150 Free Movies Online: Great Classics, Indies, Noir, Westerns, etc.. Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. Related Content: Discover Ansel Adams’ 226 Photos of U.S.

Amazing Places To Experience Around the Globe (Part 3) Devetashkata Cave - Bulgaria Ben Bulben at County Sligo, Ireland Shark Island - Sydney Baatara Gorge Waterfall, Tannourine - Lebanon Abel Tasman National Park - New Zealand Myrtos Beach, Kefalonia - Greece Sichuan - China In The Gardens of Prague Castle Neist Point, Isle of Skye - Scotland Aiguill e du midi, Chamonix, France The Hamilton Pool Nature Preserve in Texas, USA 4 Hands - Etretat, France Río Tampaón in San Luis Potosí -México Madeira, Portugal Six Senses Evason Ma’In Hot Springs, Jordan Méandre - En-Vau - Marseille (Bouches-du-Rhône) More Amazing Places To Experience Around The Globe (Part 1 - click here) More Amazing Places to Experience Around The Globe (Part 2 - click here ) Discovered a place we should include in Part 4 of Amazing Places? We'll be publishing Amazing Places as a book in late 2012

THE ALHAMBRA in Granad, Spain LAST ISLAMIC KINGDOM in SPAIN After the downfall of the Spanish Umayyad Dynasty in the 11th century, Islamic strength in the Iberian Peninsula gradually declined and Christian Reconquest proceeded. The last Islamic kingdom was the Nasrid Dynasty, which is also referred to as the Kingdom of Granada taking the name of its capital. Despite being a small kingdom it kept its independency by dexterous diplomatic capability ranking with Christian countries and its aid to the arts and learning encouraged the last Islamic culture in Europe to bloom splendidly. The Citadel looking down the city of Granada On Albaycin hill in Granada a large citadel had been constructed around the 10th century, which was referred to as eQalfat al-Hamraf (the Red Fort) , which got its name from the color of the red soil of the hill and bricks burnt of that soil. Plan of the Palace quarter of the Alhambra ( from Henri Stierlin, "Architecture de l'Islam," 1979) A ecitadelf is a town surrounded with defense walls.

Ansel Adams Photographs In 1941 the National Park Service commissioned noted photographer Ansel Adams to create a photo mural for the Department of the Interior Building in Washington, DC. The theme was to be nature as exemplified and protected in the U.S. National Parks. The project was halted because of World War II and never resumed. The holdings of the National Archives Still Picture Branch include 226 photographs taken for this project, most of them signed and captioned by Adams. The Kings Canyon photographs were taken in 1936 when the establishment of the park was being proposed. In addition, there are eight photographs taken by Adams of Yosemite in the General Photographic Files of the National Park Service. To Order: If you wish to order any of these photographs, please see the Ordering Still Picture Reproductions page. Note: Quotation marks indicate information which was copied from the reverse of the mount cards. All prints are labelled: "Kings River Canyon (Proposed as a national park). Top of Page

Invisible animals! These Incredible images show animals doing a disappearing act when predators are near These animals are trying their utmost to fool predators by blending into landscapes all over the worldThey were taken by photographer Art Wolfe over a period of 35 years, for his work 'Vanishing Act' By Matt Blake Published: 13:50 GMT, 27 December 2012 | Updated: 16:18 GMT, 28 December 2012 Whether they are hunters or the hunted, these cunning animals are all masters of disguise who can fool even the most beady-eyed passer by into believing they are not there. Some hide under lily pads, some dissolve into the bark of a tree while others slip seamlessly into the snow, either to hide from a hungry predator or silently stalk an unwitting prey. But the one thing from which they cannot hide is the all-seeing camera lens of photographer Art Wolfe. He has spent over 35 years roaming the deserts of Africa, the rainforests of South America, the mountains of the United States and snow plains of Canada to capture wildlife at its most invisible. It's white in front of you! Can you spot me?

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