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The Four Stages Of The Self-Directed Learning Model

The Four Stages Of The Self-Directed Learning Model
Four Stages Of A Self-Directed Learning Model by TeachThought Staff Self-Directed Learning is not new, but is perhaps misunderstood. Studied in terms of adult education and vocation for years, self-directed learning is increasing in popularity for a variety of reasons, including growing dissatisfaction with public schooling, and the rich formal and informal learning materials available online. This is the “age of information” after all. Self-directed learning is one response, something slideshare user Barbara Stokes captures in this chart, based on the model by Gerald Grow. The four stages–very similar to the gradual release of responsibility model–appear below. The Four Stages Of The Self-Directed Learning Model Learner Teacher Stage 1 Dependent Authority, Coach Stage 2: Interested Motivator, Guide Stage 3: Involved Facilitator Stage 4: Self-Directed Consultant, Delegator

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Evaluating Learner Autonomy: A Dynamic Model with Descriptors Maria Giovanna Tassinari, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany Tassinari, M. G. (2012). Evaluating learner autonomy: A dynamic model with descriptors. Change leader, change thyself Leo Tolstoy, the Russian novelist, famously wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” Tolstoy’s dictum is a useful starting point for any executive engaged in organizational change. After years of collaborating in efforts to advance the practice of leadership and cultural transformation, we’ve become convinced that organizational change is inseparable from individual change. Simply put, change efforts often falter because individuals overlook the need to make fundamental changes in themselves. Comprehensive new study provides foundation for future of digital higher education A new, comprehensive metastudy of the role technology plays in higher education urges universities of tomorrow to capitalize on technologies that effectively support student learning, to embrace blended learning environments, and to customize degree programs to serve the needs of students in a digital age. George Siemens, executive director of The University of Texas at Arlington's Learning Innovation and Networked Knowledge Lab, is the lead author of "Preparing for the Digital University: A Review of the History and Current State of Distance, Blended, and Online Learning." The international study offers strategies and important implications for higher education institutions preparing for the digital wave. It also emphasizes the importance of universities drawing from learning sciences research in preparing new models of teaching, learning, and student assessment. "It will be widely referenced and will inform research and other researchers for years to come," Smith said.

3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t mean we’re all suddenly omnipotent cyborgs, nor does it mean we’ve all become mindless social media addicts that spend our cognitive might tapping, swiping, and drooling on our smartphone and tablet screens. But just as the 19th century presented unique challenges to information processing than the 18th or 20th, the 21st century is different than the one before, or that the one that will come after. A Web 2.0 Class Christopher Columbus was wrong when he reported to the King and Queen that the world is round. In fact, the world is flat and so are many of our classrooms in this great nation. For years, students learned within the parameters of a building, which then separated them into rooms. Students would attend class daily and the teacher would present the daily lesson. This is how a school day has progressed for years. And in many US classrooms, it still does.

10 Ways to Take Charge of Your Own Leadership Development When I first started in the field of leadership development (when gas was 89 cents a gallon), the model we used looking like this: When someone got promoted to team leader, supervisor, or manager, they were sent a memo (no email yet) from HR informing them that they have been registered for a mandatory 4 week supervisory training course. When they showed up, some (or most) of them kicking and screaming, HR told them everything they had to learn, showed them step-by-step details, made them practice (role plays), and then sent them off to do good and no harm never to be seen or heard from again. Sadly, there are many organizations that are still using this outdated method of leadership development. While this model is inherently flawed in a number of ways, the biggest problem with it is that people won’t grow or change unless they want to. They need to be intrinsically motivated to change, and in order to be motivated, they need to have a sense of autonomy, or control.

Technology Manifesto Politicians and policymakers must put technology front and centre of their thinking for the 2015 general election. Policy Exchange's Technology Manifesto, written in association with Google and EMC as part of our Road to 2015 series of work, sets out a vision for how Britain can maximise technology's positive contribution for individuals, businesses and government. As a country we are well positioned to be a world leader in using technology for positive ends, but success will require the proactive attention of – and continuity of support from – successive governments. The manifesto sets out three principal goals: to build the world's most connected and digitally skilled society; to make Britain the most attractive place outside of Silicon Valley for technology entrepreneurs to start and grow a business; and to make our government the smartest in the world. These goals are needed because technology is changing everything.

6 Channels Of 21st Century Learning 6 Channels Of 21st Century Learning This post has been updated from a 2013 post by Terry Heick At TeachThought, we constantly wrestle with two big questions: How do people learn, and how can they do it better in a constantly evolving context? In pursuit, the theme of “21st century learning” often surfaces, a popular label that, while perhaps cliche, still seems to be necessary as we iterate learning models, fold in digital media resources, and incorporate constantly changing technology to an already chaotic event (i.e., learning).

Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock Tomorrow I am doing a training on the Treasures Supplement that I created over the summer. Most of the supplemental suggestions fall into the bottom two tiers of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Remember and Understand). I want to show teachers that just because these activities help students practice basic skills and remember and understand, there are SO many more options that will reach the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy! I created the Bloomin’ Peacock to show teachers the Blooms Taxonomy break down and the Bloomin’ digital Peacock that shows how the digital tools in the supplement break down. Below are the tools listed in my Bloomin’ Digital Peacock

How To Learn On Your Own: Make A Personal Scholar Resource Plan One of the most challenging and gratifying parts of learning alone is the opportunity to search for and select your own learning material. Students in traditional classrooms usually don’t get to decide how they are going to master course content. Instructors decide for them in the form of textbook selection, quizzes, tests, group projects, etc. As an independent learner, you can make your study time more effective by using only the learning methods that work for you. A resource plan is a document used to brainstorm the learning material you can use when you begin your studies. Why big IT projects always go wrong In 1975, a computer scientist named Fred Brooks published one of the seminal texts in the literature of computing. It had the intriguing title of The Mythical Man-Month and it consisted simply of a set of essays on the art of managing large software projects. Between its covers is distilled more wisdom about computing than is contained in any other volume, which is why it has never been out of print. And every government minister, civil servant and chief executive thinking about embarking on a large IT project should be obliged to read it – and answer a multiple-choice quiz afterwards. How come? Fred Brooks was the guy who led the team that in the 1960s created the operating system for IBM's 360 range of mainframe computers.

What Tests Actually Measure What Tests Actually Measure by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education We interrupt this general look at test validity to comment on very important educational research that was just made public (though the news of the findings was made known a few months ago on the APA website).

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