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24 Ed-Tech Terms You Should Know

If you’re a teacher or administrator who has been to an educational conference or sat in on a product demo featuring the latest classroom innovation, you know that the intersection of schools and technology is littered with buzzwords. From mLearning to mobile apps to asynchronous instruction, the ed-tech landscape is equal parts high-gloss marketing and roll-up-your-sleeves instruction. In the face of increased pressure to improve student performance, how can K–12 educators cut through the promotional hyperbole and put the focus where it should be — on classroom improvements? It helps if you speak the language. Are there any other terms you’d like to see on this list? Related:  Teacher Knowledgeteachers and technology

How to Gain Parent Buy-In for Classroom Technology Integration Every teacher who has attempted to integrate technology into the classroom knows that getting parents on board can sometimes be a challenge. It’s not uncommon for the parent of a struggling child to be on the phone with you asking questions like: “Why do you need to use technology to teach math/social studies/English/biology?” or “This is an AP history class — not computer science!” Your efforts to engage students and develop important 21st century skills can become the scapegoat explanation for problems that have nothing to do with tech. So, how do we as educators get these parents into our corner? Start Early The first time that parents hear about technology use in the classroom should not be when that child goes home with a tech-related assignment in hand. Emphasize Skills Instead of emphasizing the content side of technology and the Internet, focus on skill sets and career readiness! Keep Up the Communication Be Transparent Enlist the Aid of Your Administrators Don’t Grade “the Tech”

C’est quoi un bon prof? La question est simple, la réponse plus compliquée. J'ai pourtant allégé ma tâche en ne demandant pas : "C'est quoi un très bon prof ?" J'imagine que le prof exemplaire n'a pas recours à la stratégie d'évitement. On imagine que le "pas bon prof" est souvent absent, qu'il est en retard sur des programmes qui l'intéressent moyennement et il a tendance à penser que si cela ne se passe pas bien, c'est uniquement de la faute des élèves. Cet enseignant a tout intérêt à reconsidérer sa position et développer ses capacités d'écoute. Il a aussi intérêt à avoir un œil sur tout Revenons à la question initiale. J'entends certains commentaires : "Bravo pour la référence culturelle, un bon prof devrait plutôt citer Cicéron, Montaigne." Je poursuis. Les mêmes doivent se dire : "Peu cultivé, et prétentieux !" Comment faire taire ceux qui ne me parlent pas? Trois mots clés résument son propos: le talent, le coeur et le temps. Il faut aussi du cœur, ou si on préfère une forme de générosité.

9 Tools to Create E-magazines and Newspapers for Your Class 1- Uniflip UniFlip converts your magazine, brochure or catalog from its original PDF format into an exciting, professional multi-media digital format with pages that flip. 2-Joomag Joomag is a web tool that lets you create your own magazines using a simple online editor. 3- Scribd Scribd is known for being a reading library where you can search for and find ebooks and slides but it is also a magazine creator which allows users to upload their own content and turn it into a magazine 4- Issuu This is like Scribd above. 5- Zinepal This tools lets you create an ebook or magazine from posts and articles of a blog. 6- Build A Newspaper This one is a professional platform that provides teacher based templates to create mazagines. 7- Fodey This is most simple of all the tools mentioned here. 8- Open Zine This is another web tool that allows users to create their own magazines without any need for advanced tech knowledge. 9- Calameo

7 habits of highly effective teachersThe Always Prepped Blog We’ve all heard about Stephen Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Some teachers out there may have heard of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teachers. Below are our 7 habits of highly effective teachers who use technology: 1) They always start with the why. Technology for technology’s sake is dangerous. 2) They are malleable and can easily adapt. 3) They embrace change. 4) They share, share, and then share some more. 5) They think win-win-win-win. 6) They are extremely thorough and think two steps ahead. 7) They actively care. What are your thoughts? Always Prepped. Teachers, we would love for you to signup for our site today. Beautiful classroom reports, designed to save teachers time. A Simple Comprehensive Guide on The use of Personal Learning Networks in Education Personal Learning Networks, or PLNs, have been around for a long time. Originally they were your family, relatives and friends, or probably other educators and fellow teachers you work with in the same institution, but now and thanks to the development of web technologies and wireless connections, the concept of PLNs has been expanded to engulf people you have never met before in real world. Much of the learning nowadays takes place online and via a network of interconnected relations. PLNs are basically based on the concept of a learning community. Teachers who are passionate about developing their learning experiences recognize the value of sharing their knowledge and expertise with others. Outline : What is a PLN ? What is a PLN ? Why PLNs in education ? So, why bother thinking about creating a PLN ? Benefits of PLNs in Education Here is a list of some of the pluses of PLNs in education as featured in Personal Learning Networks: Using the Power of Connections to Transform Education

SafeKids.com | Online safety & civility 50 Education Technology Tools Every Teacher Should Know About Technology and education are pretty intertwined these days and nearly every teacher has a few favorite tech tools that make doing his or her job and connecting with students a little bit easier and more fun for all involved. Yet as with anything related to technology, new tools are hitting the market constantly and older ones rising to prominence, broadening their scope, or just adding new features that make them better matches for education, which can make it hard to keep up with the newest and most useful tools even for the most tech-savvy teachers. Here, we’ve compiled a list of some of the tech tools, including some that are becoming increasingly popular and widely used, that should be part of any teacher’s tech tool arsenal this year, whether for their own personal use or as educational aids in the classroom. Social Learning These tools use the power of social media to help students learn and teachers connect. Learning Lesson Planning and Tools Useful Tools

The greatest creative writing activity ever UPDATE: This post was awarded the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for February, 2013. Thanks to all those who voted for my work, you’re awesome. This post is a response to a question posed on the British Council’s Teaching English page on Facebook: ‘Have you got a favourite lesson plan or class activity that you come back to and use again and again? Ok, let me dive straight into it. First, I’ll describe the activity, and then I’ll tell you why it’s great. 1. How long have you been on the planet? 2. You are going to write a paragraph that tells a story.Your paragraph will be a response to these questions.Any sentence you write is OK, but you must follow the sequence of questions.You can ask me for help while you are writing. 3. What kind of language might we use to answer the first question? 4. Twenty minutes is long enough for most to finish. 5. This keeps the early finishers busy, while the slower writers aren’t disturbed and can get on with their writing. 1. Passive structures

5 Ways Rapid Technology Change Impacts Education How Rapid Technology Change Impacts Your Teaching by Terry Heick In an increasingly digital world (or increasingly digital human experience anyway), rapid technology change is a fact of life. And these threats aren’t limited to business disruption, the safety of your data, or the digital footprint of your children. There is likely very little that can be actively done to reduce these threats on a macro scale other than impact them financially as consumers, as they are first economic issues. But we can begin to understand them better as teachers. 1. Rapid technology changes increases the need for persistent, informal ‘PD.’ Technology policies, teacher growth plans, and even department structures are impotent against this rate of change, and this degree of fragmentation. This makes the curiosity and professional diligence of the educators themselves supplant notions of top-down professional development. 2. But in other ways, these apparent Luddites might have a point. 3. 4. 5.

This Is What Happens When A Kid Leaves Traditional Education Logan Laplante is a 13 year-old boy who was taken out of the education system to be home schooled instead. Not only was he home schooled, but Logan had the ability to tailor his education to his interests and also his style of learning, something traditional education does not offer. As Logan has mentioned, when he grows up he wants to be happy and healthy. At a TEDx talk in 2013, he discussed how hacking his education is helping him achieve that goal. Logan’s story can be seen in a similar light as Jacob Barnett‘s story who was first put in Special Ed by his school until he was pulled out of standard education and is now seen as an incredibly intelligent young person who is on track to winning a Nobel Prize one day. I also recently did a TEDx talk in 2014 about my story of leaving college for good. More on Education & Homeschooling Currently about 3.8% of children ages 5 – 17 are home schooled in the US. Does Education Kill Creativity? Sources: Learn To Use Your Thoughts To Reverse Aging!

Changing the Culture, One Teacher at a Time As technology rushes into schools at an ever-increasing pace, we are constantly bombarded by talk about whatever happens to be hot this week. Khan Academy! Ipads in classrooms! Howeve r, once we clear through all of the hype and excitement, the fact remains that no technology is going to change anything in a classroom without teachers who not only understand how to use that technology, but – cialis in mexico far more importantly -understand how that piece of technology can have an impact on the way that learning takes place in their classrooms. The real challenge for school administrators is how to encourage teachers to adopt a mindset that sees technology as a powerful lever that can help them to alter their classrooms to produce more authentic and deeper learning. The approach in my school is to narrow my view. The real work on our part is with the next category of teachers – those who are willing to learn but are not sure where to begin.

Educators as Social Networked Learners This fall, I am getting the opportunity to design and teach a graduate course for Boise State University’s Education Technology Program entitled, Social Networked Learning. The majority of students in the program are K-12 in-service teachers who are seeking ways to enhance their teaching with integrated and emerging technologies. Course Description This course explores collaborative and emergent pedagogies, tools, and theory related to the use of social networks in learning environments. The ideas, content, and exercises presented in this course are driven by two basic tenets: We are living, learning, and educating in an information-rich (Shirky), connected (Siemens), creative (Florida), participatory (Jenkins) culture.This culture is seeing growth, development, and evolution of information and technology as never seen before in the history of humankind. Learning Goals Course Modules Course Assignments Assignment

Alternative Video Use in the Flipped Classroom Guest post by FLN executive director, Kari Arfstrom. Recently, you may have heard about flipped learning. If you read any professional journals or education publications over the summer break, most of them have written at least one story on this new ideology. Every education blogger seems to have an opinion on the topic as well. National news organizations like CNN and NPR have covered it, along with the New York Times and the Washington Post, which has done multiple stories. Survey says: Flipped learning boosts grades, attitudes, satisfaction You may have decided to flip your classroom (or are thinking about it) to increase student interest and learning, to stave off doing the “same thing day after day,” and to utilize past technology purchases that can finally be realized as increasing satisfaction for both teachers and students. The vast majority of educators who responded to the poll have more than 7 years of experience (85%) and have flipped their classroom two years or less.

44 Better Ways To Use Smartphones In The Classroom 44 Better Ways To Use Smartphones In The Classroom by John Hardison first appeared on gettingsmart.com This week an online article grabbed my attention. Its title read “94 Percent of High School Students Using Cellphones in Class.” I immediately scoped out the heading and thought to myself, “Finally, teachers are beginning to embrace the powerful little gadgets.” However, it did not take me long to realize the researched article took quite a different slant. One quotation in particular caused serious professional introspection on my behalf. I understand the tougher task of using regular cell phones in class versus internet ready smartphones, however , I could not disagree more with the above quotation. A blessed trip to the ISTE 2011 conference in Philadelphia helped me devise a BYOD classroom management plan and opened my eyes to the infinite educational potential of smartphones in the classroom. 44 Better Ways To Use Smartphones In The Classroom Use Smartphones to Collaborate

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