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Snapshot of a Deeper Learning Classroom: Aligning TED Talks to the Four Cs

Edutopia is pleased to premiere the first blog in a new series designed to showcase compelling examples of how students are developing 21st century skills through a deeper-level of learning. Through this blog series, we hope to increase awareness and encourage replication of successful models. Chris Anderson, TED curator. (Photo credit: Pierre Omidyar via Wikimedia Commons) As many of my readers know, this year I have been dedicated to using the 21st Century four Cs. The four Cs are a rubric of sorts that help align lessons to more reality-based learning and assessing. As I design a lesson or assessment, I ask myself if what I've designed, or what the students must master, correlates to the important skills of: CollaborationCommunicationCritical ThinkingCreativity My lessons and tests must incorporate one or more of of the four Cs to, in my opinion, be worthy of spending precious instructional time in the classroom. ProcessEnvironmentContentProduct An example of this is my TED Talks unit.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/deeper-learning-ted-talks-heather-wolpert-gawron

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Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre Approaches to learning describe what students do when they go about learning and why they do it. The basic distinction is between a deep approach to learning, where students are aiming towards understanding, and a surface approach to learning, where they are aiming to reproduce material in a test or exam rather than actually understand it. This theory is explored further in Tool 3 of education theories on learning by Jenni Case (2008). Introduction The concept of preferences to different individual learning styles was introduced in an accompanying document. (See learning styles).

Deeper Learning: A Collaborative Classroom Is Key What's ideal when it comes to collaboration in our classrooms? Here's one coveted scenario: several children gathered at a table engaged in a high-level task, discussing, possibly debating an issue, making shared decisions, and designing a product that demonstrates all this deeper learning. As teachers, we'd love to see this right out the gate, but this sort of sophisticated teamwork takes scaffolding. It won't just happen by placing students together with a piece of provocative text or an engaging task. (Heck, this deeper learning collaboration is challenging for most adults!)

'I Urge You to Drop E67-02': Course Syllabi by Famous Authors This is what it'd be like to take a class taught by David Foster Wallace, Katie Roiphe, or Zadie Smith. David Foster Wallace Every once in a while, one of eminent professor and author David Foster Wallace's syllabi emerges on the Internet, and devotees head to their local bookstores. In that spirit, I've taken this opportunity to pull together a series of famous authors' syllabi and reading lists. Who needs to go to college when you've got a list of texts from the best and a public library?

The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have By EdTech Team Updated on march 2, 2015 : The original list that was created in 2011 comprised 33 skills , after reviewing it we decided to do some merging and finally ended up with the 20 skills below. The 21st century teacher should be able to : 1- Create and edit digital audio Here are some tools for teachers to develop this skill :Free Audio Tools for Teachers L Houle's Wiki - NO Registration Necessary Updated April 2016 When working with K-8 students we must be concerned for students' privacy and anonymity. Most Web 2.0 sites require registration or allow teachers to set up class accounts. These extra steps to set up educational accounts takes time that's hard to locate in your busy day.

Deeper Learning: Performance Assessment and Authentic Audience In a conversation with a veteran educator -- a man with years of experience teaching English and acting as a headmaster -- I was confronted with a prejudice so ingrained in my teaching that I was almost embarrassed to admit it. He said, "You know, when I ask a student to write a paper and turn it in to me, that's ridiculous; I'm the worst audience they could have." I was intrigued.

Developing Self-Assessment with the Dual-Entry Rubric and Author’s Memo If you don’t score essays with rubrics, you probably have good reason. Maybe you don’t accept that all the qualities of an essay can be reduced to metrics, or resist the pressure to standardize students’ performances, or feel that rubrics are an overly legalistic means to cover yourself when students or parents protest a grade, or balk at the notion that evaluating essays is objective. If you do score essays with rubrics, you probably have good reason. Maybe you want to make essay evaluation more transparent to students, or feel that itemizing an essay’s strengths and weaknesses benefits writers, or believe in making essay scoring as objective as possible. I use rubrics on occasion and have experimented with different versions in an attempt to mitigate against some of a rubric’s drawbacks. The following section describes one type of rubric that I believe enhances students’ self-assessment skills.

ePortfolios - Overview - ePortfolios with GoogleApps What is an ePortfolio? An ePortfolio (electronic portfolio) is an electronic collection of evidence that shows your learning journey over time. Portfolios can relate to specific academic fields or your lifelong learning. Evidence may include writing samples, photos, videos, research projects, observations by mentors and peers, and/or reflective thinking. The key aspect of an eportfolio is your reflection on the evidence, such as why it was chosen and what you learned from the process of developing your eportfolio. (Adapted from Philippa Butler’s “Review of the Literature on Portfolios and Eportfolios” (2006), page 2.) How can schools take global learning to the next level? For the past week, we've been exploring global awareness in schools and sharing ideas about how our students can become internationally minded and develop as true global citizens. It's become clear over this week just how vital these skills are if our students are going to thrive as adults - and in an increasingly interconnected world there's really no excuse for students and schools to live in a bubble. As part of this series we ran a live chat so teaching professionals could come together and share best practice, new thinking and ideas. Thanks to everyone who took part. The live chat uncovered so many fantastic ideas and tips that we have pulled out the best for you here: Joe Dale, independent consultant and former languages teacher

The Story of a Tweet When you follow people, their Tweets instantly show up in your timeline. Similarly, your Tweets show up in your followers' timelines. To see interesting Tweets, follow interesting people: friends, celebrities, news sources, or anyone whose Tweets you enjoy. Learn the lingo Compose

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