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Visual storytelling: 14 tools for journalists

Credit: Image by TapiF on Flickr. Some rights reserved Over the past year here at Journalism.co.uk we have reported on a number of new tools and platforms which have been launched or updated, which offer journalists different ways of telling stories visually. Our news:rewired events have also highlighted a number of those tools, most recently in a dedicated session on visual storytelling at news:rewired - digital stories, which was held last Thursday (6 December). Here is a list of just 14 tools that journalists might find useful. Timelines 1. Users simply sign up to Timetoast and then they can create embeddable timelines. Each event added to the timeline can have an image and link added to it. At news:rewired last week Paul Rowland, deputy head of content (digital), Media Wales, recommended using Timetoast to build timelines, showing one he created on "Wales' rise and fall since Rugby World Cup 2011" as an example of the tool in use. 2. Data visualisations 3. 4. 5. Multimedia packages 6. 7. Related:  Digital storytellingDigital StorytellingEd-Tech

Write About This DigitalStorytelling “I know only one thing about the technologies that awaits us in the future:We will find ways to tell stories with them.” Jason Ohlar Presentation brought to you by American TESOL! Check out their other video presentations! Slideshow of the Presentation Download the Hand-Outs from the Presentation! *Elements of the Story- Hand-out by Kevin Hodgson *Character Development- Hand-out by Kevin Hodgson *Storyboarding- Hand-out by Kevin Hodgson *Storyboarding- Hand-out by Bernajean Porter Videos Featured in the Presentation *A Short Love Story in Stop Motion by Carlos Lascano A SHORT LOVE STORY IN STOP MOTION from Carlos Lascano on Vimeo. *How A Short Love Story was Created *Chiarastella- Stop Motion Film by Raffaella Traniello's class Chiarastella from Raffaella Traniello on Vimeo. *How Chiarastella was Created *How to create stopmotion claymation films using PowerPoint by Maryna Badenhorst. Featured Tools/ Websites from the Presentation! *Creaza - Create comics, make movies, edit audio, and more! *Storybird

La boite à outils du formateur innovant " Format... The Art Of Storytelling » Tell A Story Get inspired by featured artwork from the Delaware Art Museum and write a story through the interactive Tell a Story activity. Look through the images below for a brief introduction on how this activity works, or click on the link below to begin telling your story. Launch the Tell a Story Activity 1) Choose an inspirational work of art First, select a work of art as the inspiration for your story. 2) Tell your story Next, you'll write a story to accompany the artwork. 3) Share your story Once finished, you have the option to send your creation to family and friends, and submit it to the Delaware Art Museum to be included in an online gallery of stories. Launch the Tell a Story Activity

Licence Creative Commons Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Objectif[modifier | modifier le code] Les licences Creative Commons ont été créées en partant du principe que la propriété intellectuelle était fondamentalement différente de la propriété physique, et du constat selon lequel les lois actuelles sur le copyright étaient un frein à la diffusion de la culture. Leur but est de fournir un outil juridique qui garantit à la fois la protection des droits de l'auteur d'une œuvre artistique et la libre circulation du contenu culturel de cette œuvre, ceci afin de permettre aux auteurs de contribuer à un patrimoine d'œuvres accessibles dans le « domaine public » (notion prise au sens large). Vue générale[modifier | modifier le code] Le système se base sur plusieurs paramètres binaires : commercial / non commercial (NC) ;modifiable / non modifiable (ND) ;créations dérivées à partager selon la même licence (SA) / licence au choix du créateur final. Zero : le créateur renonce à ses droits. Version courante : 4.0

9 Web 2.0 Sites to Publish Student Work Written by Mark Brumley Publish and Share Student Work Publishing educational technology enhanced content online, in eye-catching formats, is easier than ever. And, students love to publish their projects online and share with their family and friends. Use these easy-to-use web 2.0 sites to publish, share and celebrate student work. Two Publishing Categories Online content publishing (leaving out the massive blogging category) falls into two broad categories. Yudu Yudu lets you upload all sorts of content including Word documents and PDF’s. Flipsnack Flipsnack is very similar to Yudu and is extremely easy to use. Issuu Issuu (pronounced “issue”) is another option to upload almost any document format and transform it into a virtual flipping book. Tikatok Tikatok is aimed at younger students and is a wonderful tool for story creation. Mixbook Mixbook is very similar to Tikatok but features some sophisticated editing tools perfect for middle or high school students.

Evaluating Projects | Digitales "A story should be remembered for its soul, not the bells and whistles." Bernajean Porter If you don’t have a good or powerful story, script, and storyboard, then there will never be enough decorating that technology can do to cover it up. On the other hand, demonstrating exemplar craftsmanship with mixing the technical elements in artful ways to unfold your story creates compelling, insightful, original and memorable pieces of communication. Quality craftsmanship intentionally uses each technical element (images, sound, transitions, music, special effects, titles, pacing, and design) to provide an integral contribution to telling the story in a way that the removal of that element would lesson the emotional impact and understanding. Digital Media Scoring Guides Feedback Four general ways are listed to consider for the wrap-up feedback approach after digital stories have been created. Informal Reflecting What parts of the story touch you? Formal Reflecting Informal Evaluating Formal Evaluating

Enrichir mon cours Moodle avec les outils du Web Picturebook English Language Learners and the Power of Personal Stories We’ve asked Larry Ferlazzo, a prolific blogger and Twitter user who has written a recent book called “English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies That Work,” to do a guest post for us today. More than five million children in the United States enter school each year speaking a language other than English. That amount is expected to grow to 25% by the year 2025. It’s not surprising, then, that we hear from readers regularly that the more we can offer for this group, the better. Larry has an interesting background: he spent the first twenty years of his career as a community organizer in California, often working with foreign-born populations. We’ve asked him to detail the ways he’s adapted what he calls the Organizing Cycle to his current students, and he’s provided some very easy and quick lesson ideas (off Times resources, of course) to show how anyone can do it. Please let us know how you address E.L.L. issues in your classroom by joining the conversation below. The key element?

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