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Strategies for Effective Lesson Planning

Stiliana Milkova Center for Research on Learning and Teaching A lesson plan is the instructor’s road map of what students need to learn and how it will be done effectively during the class time. Before you plan your lesson, you will first need to identify the learning objectives for the class meeting. Then, you can design appropriate learning activities and develop strategies to obtain feedback on student learning. A successful lesson plan addresses and integrates these three key components: Objectives for student learning Teaching/learning activities Strategies to check student understanding Specifying concrete objectives for student learning will help you determine the kinds of teaching and learning activities you will use in class, while those activities will define how you will check whether the learning objectives have been accomplished (see Fig. 1). Steps for Preparing a Lesson Plan Below are six steps to guide you when you create your first lesson plans. (2) Develop the introduction

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Losing confidence in university teaching We’ve come to expect less and less. Before we came to university most of us had perceptions which provoked images of ancient libraries, world class academics, the sense of an academic community and regular tutoring with a couple of fellow students. However, in the last decade I think it is fair to say that this utopian image of a university experience has been shattered. Today’s students appreciate that they study in a larger student body with fewer resources to go round. But still, I think we expect too little and get too little from our learning experience at university. Students across Edinburgh are seeing reductions in teaching time, poor feedback on their work and, at universities like Edinburgh, a shift to research at the general expense of teaching.

19 free lesson planning resources teachers need to see The Internet makes it easy for teachers to network, view video examples of colleagues' work and even make some money sharing their own work with others. Sifting through lesson plan resources online can be a daunting task, but the good news is that there is a lot out there and much of it comes free of charge. Every teacher is only a few clicks away from a vast community of educators who share common goals, face the same challenges and continue to search for similar solutions every day.

21st-Century Teacher Education For almost as long as there have been institutions dedicated to the preparation of new teachers, the endeavor has come in for criticism. Teacher education has long struggled both to professionalize and to fully integrate itself into mainstream academia. At the core of this struggle was a perception that there was no body of specialized knowledge for teaching that justified specialized training. Instructional Strategies for Online Courses Instructional Strategies for Online Courses Effective online instruction depends on learning experiences appropriately designed and facilitated by knowledgeable educators. Because learners have different learning stylesor a combination of styles, online educators should design activities multiple modes of learning in order to provide significant experiences for each class participant. In designing online courses, use multiple instructional strategies. Teaching models exist which apply to traditional higher education learning environments, and when designing courses for the online environment, these strategies should be adapted to the new environment.

Five Free Web 2.0 Tools to Support Lesson Planning "Teachers need to integrate technology seamlessly into the curriculum instead of viewing it as an add-on, an afterthought or an event." -- Heidi Hayes Jacobs, Educational Consultant, Curriculum Designers, Inc. Web 2.0 tools are online software programs that allow users to do a number of different things. They can be used to teach curriculum content, store data, create or edit video, edit photos, collaborate and so much more. 6 Free Websites for Learning and Teaching Science From robotics to space research, from physics to computer science, the Internet is a vast trove of information about the sciences. Resources such as Wikipedia (and its easy-on-younger-minds counterpart, Simple English Wikipedia) and online video make the process of learning about and teaching science subjects much easier than ever before. Rather than resorting to yet another 600-page textbook, next time you're hard up for understanding or inspiration, check out one of these six websites that offer information on the sciences. And particularly if you're a scientist or educator yourself, let us know in the comments where you hang out online to learn about and discuss your favorite science topics.

Establishing a Quality Review for Online Courses A formal review of online courses measures their quality in key areas and reveals changes needed for improvement, if any By Tracy Chao, Tami Saj, and Felicity Tessier Since the inception of online learning in the 1990s, innovative technology and pedagogy have broadened access to higher education. Many colleges and universities remain concerned about the issue of quality for online educational programs, however, especially compared to face-to-face delivery. Quality issues often manifest as discussions on teaching effectiveness, faculty-to-student ratios, attrition rates, student satisfaction, and institutional resources invested in online delivery.1 Distance or online education programs must develop and maintain quality educational options to successfully compete with conventional academic offerings—institutions cannot maintain a competitive edge solely from innovation of the online delivery format. A quality educational program begins with the development of quality courses.

The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator The Differentiator is based on Bloom's Taxonomy, Kaplan and Gould's Depth and Complexity, and David Chung's product menu. 25 Best Websites for Teachers 1. Best for Young Readers: scholastic.com/stacks At The Stacks, students can post book reviews, get reading recommendations, play games based on the latest series, watch "Meet the Author" videos, and more. It's like Facebook for reading and it's safe for school, too. 2. U An immersive learning experience from Rheingold U A half-day (four hour) online workshop with Howard Rheingold introduces the mindset, attention training, online media skills, and information tools you need to transform information overload into knowledge navigation. Learn about tools to bring continuous streams of relevant information to your attention and techniques for harvesting useful knowledge and avoiding distraction. Today's Problem: Overload vs Need to Know In business, education, and daily life, each of us are bombarded by an overwhelming amount of information from a growing number of channels; we need to shield ourselves to avoid feeling overwhelmed. Despite a growing portfolio of tools and services at our fingertips, the sense of being adrift, falling behind, and out of control continues to grow.

Lesson Plan Maker Need Tons of New Worksheets? - 50,000+ printables - Save Time! View Now... Math and English Language Arts - 15,000+ English - 5,000+ Math See It Here... Podcast Podcasters from two Norwegian podcasts, «Giæver & Joffen» and «Aftenpodden» during a recording in 2015. A podcast is a form of digital media that consists of an episodic series of audio, video, digital radio, PDF, or ePub files subscribed to and downloaded through web syndication or streamed online to a computer or mobile device. The word is a portmanteau of "(i)Pod" and "broadcast." The Merriam Webster Tenth International Collegiate defines "podcast" as: a program (as of music or talk) made available in digital format for automatic download over the Internet.[1] Name[edit]

2015 Higher Education Edition The NMC Horizon Report > 2015 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). This 12th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The report aims to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership and practice.

Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. From: KC Metro [old link, no longer functioning?] Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the way people learn into three domains. One of these is the cognitive domain, which emphasizes intellectual outcomes.

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