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Unmanned aerial vehicle

Unmanned aerial vehicle
A group photo of aerial demonstrators at the 2005 Naval Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Air Demo. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), commonly known as drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot aboard. Its flight is controlled either autonomously by onboard computers or by the remote control of a pilot on the ground or in another vehicle. The typical launch and recovery method of an unmanned aircraft is by the function of an automatic system or an external operator on the ground.[1] Historically, UAVs were simple remotely piloted aircraft, but autonomous control is increasingly being employed.[2][not in citation given] They are usually deployed for military and special operation applications, but also used in a small but growing number of civil applications, such as policing and firefighting, and nonmilitary security work, such as surveillance of pipelines. UAVs are often preferred for missions that are too "dull, dirty or dangerous"[3] for manned aircraft. History[edit] The birth of U.S. U.S.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unmanned_aerial_vehicle

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Electric Airplanes Will Change The Future Each year, over 3 billion people travel on airplanes. Worldwide, airplanes produced 689 million tonnes of CO2 in 2012. These numbers are expected to grow higher in the future. According to the Air Transport Action Group, the global aviation industry produces around 2% of all human-induced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Road transport is responsible for 74% of C02 emissions. I don't think I'll ever understand the point of non-removable batteries Everything that does anything in this world requires some source of energy in order to make it do the things they do. Animals require food and water, fire needs heat and electronics need electric currents. Where do you get electric currents? From a lot of places, actually, but for this particular topic we're going to look at batteries.

Flying car As part of AeroMobil’s team Martin is responsible for company’s strategy in the areas financing, market entry, and regulatory affairs. Martin is a technology entrepreneur, investor, and public policy leader. He is the founder and former executive chairman of Neulogy, the first major advisory and investment boutique in Central and Eastern Europe focusing on R&D, technology transfer and technology start-ups.

Spike S-512 The Spike S-512 is a projected supersonic business jet, designed by Spike Aerospace, an American aerospace firm based in Boston, Massachusetts.[2] If produced, it would allow long flights for business and private travelers, such as from New York City to London, to take only three to four hours instead of six to seven.[1][3] The company plans to promote the project with an exhibit at the 2014 EAA Airventure airshow.[4] The aircraft will not have windows for the passengers, instead it will be lined with tiny cameras sending footage to thin, curved displays lining the interior walls of the fuselage.[5] Spike expects to launch the plane by December 2018.[5] Specifications[edit] Spike claims the jet will have a cruise speed of Mach 1.4-1.6.[1][3] General characteristics

How the NSA can 'turn on' your cell phone remotely - Jun. 6, 2014 That's what ex-spy Edward Snowden revealed in last week's interview with NBC's Brian Williams. It sounds like sorcery. Can someone truly bring your phone back to life without touching it? NY already using aerial drones — just for fun We’re in the drone zone. The nation is flipping out over the future of unmanned aerial vehicles — but they’ve already taken off in New York. The aerial robots have soared across the public library, MTV broadcasts and the Electric Zoo Festival. Federal agents fly planes that spy on American cell phones - Nov. 13, 2014 NEW YORK (CNNMoney) On Thursday the Wall Street Journal cited unnamed sources who said the planes carry a box that serves as a dummy cell phone site. That device mimics actual towers, duping nearby cell phones into connecting to it instead of a real phone company tower.

Google Ultimate Interface About Google In 1996-1997, Larry Page and Sergey Brin came up with an algorithm to rank web pages, called PageRank. Realizing the potential to improve search engines, they tried and failed to sell the technology to any. Skylon spaceplane engine concept achieves key milestone 28 November 2012Last updated at 03:10 ET By Jonathan Amos Science correspondent, BBC News Sabre's trick: Hot air passes over the piping, plunging to lower than -140C in just 1/100th of a second The UK company developing an engine for a new type of spaceplane says it has successfully demonstrated the power unit's enabling technology. Reaction Engines Ltd (REL) of Culham, Oxfordshire, ran a series of tests on key elements of its Sabre propulsion system under the independent eye of the European Space Agency (Esa).

FBI lets suspects go to protect 'Stingray' secrets - Mar. 18, 2015 The device, called a "Stingray," tricks cell phones into revealing their locations. A judge's court order this week threatens to reveal closely guarded details about how police use Stingrays. Judge Patrick H. NeMoyer in Buffalo, New York, described a 2012 deal between the FBI and the Erie County Sheriff's Office in his court order Tuesday: The FBI instructed the police to drop criminal charges instead of revealing "any information concerning the cell site simulator or its use."

6 Ways Bing is the Opposite of Google Search has been synonymous with Google for over a decade and a half. Even as search marketers, we are guilty of focusing a disproportionate amount of our time and resources into optimizing our campaigns, websites, and social media to Google. Google dictates what is acceptable and shape content strategies, campaign messaging, even business models. Ground effect vehicle A ground effect vehicle (GEV) is one that attains level flight near the surface of the Earth, making use of the aerodynamic interaction between the wings and the surface known as ground effect. Best known are the Soviet ekranoplanes, but names like wing-in-ground-effect (WIG), flarecraft, sea skimmer, or wing-in-surface-effect ship (WISE) are also used. In recent years a large number of different GEV types have been developed for both civilian and military use. However, these craft have yet to enter widespread use.

Printer steganography An illustration showing small yellow tracking dots on white paper, generated by a color laser printer. Printer steganography is a type of steganography – "hiding data within data"[1] – produced by color printers, including Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP, IBM, Konica Minolta, Kyocera, Lanier, Lexmark, Ricoh, Toshiba and Xerox brand color laser printers,[2] where tiny yellow dots are added to each page. The dots are barely visible and contain encoded printer serial numbers and timestamps. Unlike many forms of steganography, the hidden information is not intended to be available from a computer file, but to allow serial number and time of printing to be determined by close examination of a printout. Color laser printers appear to be the type mostly involved, the measure being brought in during the 1990s by Xerox and other companies seeking to reassure governments that their printers wouldn't be used for forgery.

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