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How To Know If You're Correctly Integrating Technology

How To Know If You're Correctly Integrating Technology
A common question that we hear from teachers about integrating technology into their classrooms is, “how do I know if I’m doing it right?” We love to hear this question because that tells us that the teacher is starting to analyze and evaluate how they are integrating technology and are looking for a way to gauge their effectiveness. We feel that the Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) best addresses the question of “doing it right.” According to the Arizona K-12 Center at Northern Arizona University , “the TIM is designed to assist schools and districts in evaluating the level of technology integration in classrooms and to provide teachers with models of how technology can be integrated throughout instruction in meaningful ways.” There is more than one version of the TIM but the one that we most commonly refer to with our staff was produced by the Arizona K12 Center at NAU. What is The Technology Integration Matrix? Download PDF of the Technology Integration Matrix Related:  Ed Tech

Five technology skills every student should learn Readers say technology literacy is about much more than learning how to use certain applications By Meris Stansbury, Associate EditorRead more by Meris Stansbury September 4th, 2012 “It’s important to remember that technology is there to bend to your will, not the other way around,” said one reader. What are the most critical technology skills for students to learn? We recently asked our readers this question, and here’s what they had to say. From having the courage to experiment with different technologies to possessing online literacy, readers said being a tech-savvy student in the 21st century is about much more than learning how to use a certain software program or device—it’s about being able to adapt to what’s constantly changing. What do you think of this list? (Comments edited for brevity.) 1. “Students need to be able to read a news article and determine if there is bias and if it’s truthful.

14 Edtech Integration Tips & 20+ Resources for the School Year 4th post in a new series: PLN Tips 4 Teachers and Goal 17: Integrate Technology Effectively of The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators “Technology is just a tool. In terms of getting the kids working together and motivating them, the teacher is the most important.” ~ Bill Gates I have been integrating technology with students since 1997. I remember some of the first technologies I used with students were a TV/VCR, cassette recorders, cameras, polaroids, large video cameras, large desktop computers, microscopes, telescopes, the Internet, a transparency projector, and a video projector. Maybe you’re new to integrating technology or just need a few pointers. More Tips & 20+ Resources Beyond the first tip of connecting online and learning from other educators, I offer the following tips from my PLN, which are in no particular order: Tip: Assess if you need to use the technology. Tip: Have a back-up plan in case the Internet doesn’t work. Tip: Get ideas from other teachers. Tip: Have fun with it!

100 Important Google Drive Tips for Teachers and Students Google Drive provides a streamlined, collaborative solution to writing papers, organizing presentations and putting together spreadsheets and reports. But besides the basic features, there are lots of little tricks and hacks you can use to make your Google Docs experience even more productive. Here are 100 great tips for using the documents, presentations and spreadsheets in Google Docs. Why It's Time To Start BYOD In Your School I remember fondly, my time as a young and plucky probationary teacher. Exploring the realities of classroom practice and experimenting with new pedagogy. I recall quite clearly the time when my first classroom was equipped with a single desktop computer. Today, it is equipped with 30 desktop computers, a projector, an interactive whiteboard, a visualiser, an A3 colour printer, a laser printer and even a 3D Printer. The Gradual Shift Yet, one could argue that somewhere on this journey, my pedagogy has lost focus and that there remains disconnect between my ambition for interactive learning through technology and the realities of my practice. Let’s explore this concept… From the teacher perspective, the learning environment could be seen as technology-rich, including the integration of teaching aides; an arsenal of technology placed at the teacher’s disposal. The flipped perspective, from the student’s point of view can be very different. Why BYOD? Next Generation Of Learning

iPad Apps and Bloom’s Taxonomy   I felt it was worthwhile to update the Top Post (over 25,000 views) on Langwitches: Bloom’s Taxonomy for iPads I have added links to each app represented on the visual. Remember: Exhibit memory of previously-learned materials by recalling facts, terms, basic concepts and answers. describenamefindnamelisttell Suggested apps: Understand: Demonstrative understanding of facts and ideas by being able to: explaincomparediscusspredicttranslateoutlinerestate Suggested Apps: Apply: Using new knowledge. showcompleteuseexamineillustrateclassifysolve Analyze: Examine and break information into parts by identifying motives or causes. compareexamineexplainidentifycategorizecontrastinvestigate Evaluate: Present and defend opinions by making judgments about information, validity of ideas or quality of work based on a set of criteria justifyassessprioritizerecommendratedecidechoose Suggested Apps Create: planinventcomposedesignconstructimagine Related Bloom's Taxonomy and iPad Apps 21. In "Featured Carousel" 7. 29.

Digital Promise - Accelerating Innovation in Education Bloomin' Apps This page gathers all of the Bloomin' Apps projects in one place.Each image has clickable hotspots and includes suggestions for iPad, Android, Google and online tools and applications to support each of the levels of Bloom's Revised Taxonomy.I have created a page to allow you to share your favorite online tool, iOS, or Android app with others. Cogs of the Cognitive Processes I began to think about the triangular shape of Bloom's Taxonomy and realized I thought of it a bit differently.Since the cognitive processes are meant to be used when necessary, and any learner goes in and out of the each level as they acquire new content and turn it into knowledge, I created a different type of image that showcased my thoughts about Bloom's more meaningfully.Here is my visual which showcases the interlocking nature of the cognitive processes or, simply, the "Cogs of the Cognitive Processes". IPAD APPS TO SUPPORT BLOOM'S REVISED TAXONOMYassembled by Kathy Schrock​ Bloom's and SAMR: My thoughts

40 Ways Education Technology Will Be Used In The Future Do you know what technology you’ll be using in the classroom 5 years from now? What about 10 years from now? A new visualization may be able to help. Thanks to the hard work by Envisioning Tech , it’s simple to see what we could expect to happen in the next few decades. From today’s iPads to holograms in the year 2040, there’s a lot coming to a classroom near you. Better still, the visualization below is categorized into color-coded topics. Want to post this up in the teacher’s lounge or on your desk?

Cargo-Bot National Education Technology Plan The National Education Technology Plan is the flagship educational technology policy document for the United States. The Plan articulates a vision of equity, active use, and collaborative leadership to make everywhere, all-the-time learning possible. While acknowledging the continuing need to provide greater equity of access to technology itself, the plan goes further to call upon all involved in American education to ensure equity of access to transformational learning experiences enabled by technology. The principles and examples provided in this document align to the Activities to Support the Effective Use of Technology (Title IV A) of Every Student Succeeds Act as authorized by Congress in December 2015. In order to keep pace with the changes we are seeing in schools, districts, and states on an almost daily basis, we are updating the NETP more often. Feedback from our stakeholders indicates that the previous five year update cycle was not frequent enough.

Idea to retire: Technology alone can improve student learning Nearly every aspect of the world is being transformed by digital tools. Over Thanksgiving weekend in 2015, more people shopped online than braved the aisles of brick and mortar stores fighting for highly discounted items. Globally, there are 2.6 billion active smartphone subscriptions. And self-driving cars have already clocked over 1 million miles on public roads. There is no doubt that technology is impacting how we educate our children and ourselves as well. For generations, the belief that new technology will either transform or make schools obsolete has persisted. For example, there is a belief that students today are “digital natives” and as technology-savvy, multi-tasking, always-on individuals, they don’t need to be taught how to use technology effectively in order to learn. What does make a difference is how students use technology. Similarly, access to technology doesn’t transform teaching. The notion that technology itself can improve student outcomes must die. 1Wang, S.

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