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Project-Based Learning Research Review

Project-Based Learning Research Review
Editor's Note: This article was originally written by Vanessa Vega, with subsequent updates made by the Edutopia staff. Studies have proven that when implemented well, project-based learning (PBL) can increase retention of content and improve students' attitudes towards learning, among other benefits. Edutopia's PBL research review explores the vast body of research on the topic and helps make sense of the results. In this series of five articles, learn how researchers define project-based learning, review some of the possible learning outcomes, get our recommendations of evidence-based components for successful PBL, learn about best practices across disciplines, find tips for avoiding pitfalls when implementing PBL programs, and dig in to a comprehensive annotated bibliography with links to all the studies and reports cited in these pages. What is Project-Based Learning? Learning Outcomes Keys to Project-Based Learning Success

http://www.edutopia.org/pbl-research-learning-outcomes

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Research-Supported PBL Practices At one New Tech Network high school, strategies backed by research make project-based learning effective and engaging for teachers and students. At Manor New Technology High School in Manor, Texas, several research-based practices interact to promote successful inquiry-based learning: Manor New Tech is part of the New Tech Network, a nonprofit that works with schools and districts around the country providing services and support to help reform learning through project-based learning (PBL). Getting to grips with project based learning One of the things that I love to start my classes with is a ‘mission statement’ of what we will achieve by the end of the day. By doing this, we can then use our coursebook materials as a means of reaching that end goal, rather than the book itself being the focus. For example, instead of stating that ‘by the end of today, we will have finished pages 11, 12 and 13’, I say ‘by the end of today, we will have learned about the education systems of different countries, made comparisons and presented our findings to our classmates.’ For quite a while I felt quite pleased with myself for having come up with a motivating way of going about teaching; that is until I realized that I was basically implementing a Project-based Learning approach. Despite not having invented some great new methodology, I’m still happy that I do things this way.

Problem Solving Home | A-Z List | Standards | Topics Problem Solving Resources: Links to Problem Solving Sites Links to Problem Solving Sites: Grades K-8 Project-Based Learning Research Review: Evidence-Based Components of Success What boosts PBL from a fun and engaging exercise to a rigorous and powerful real-world learning experience? Researchers have identified four key components that are critical to teaching successfully with PBL (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008; Ertmer & Simons, 2005; Mergendoller & Thomas, 2005; Hung, 2008). All of these play a role in the curriculum-design process. Classroom Guide: Top Ten Tips for Assessing Project-Based Learning (now available in Spanish!) Facebook Edutopia on Facebook Twitter Edutopia on Twitter Google+ Pinterest

Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project Sure, King Middle School has some amazing projects, but the Portland school has been refining its expeditionary learning projects for nearly two decades. David Grant, who guides the school's technology integration and curriculum development, has put together a six-step rubric for designing a project. He says Fading Footprints, which became a model for King and Expeditionary Learning Schools, doesn't take an entire school, or even a team of twelve, to plan and carry out; one or two teachers can tailor this one to fit their time and resources. Are We Taking Our Students’ Work Seriously Enough? ” credit=”Erin Scott In the course of studying different aspects of children’s environments, Dr. Roger Hart noticed that “a lot of supposedly participatory projects had a distinct air of tokenism.

Training Teachers to Teach Critical Thinking How KIPP educators instruct their colleagues to enhance their classroom practice. KIPP King Collegiate High School principal Jason Singer trains his teachers to lead Socratic discussions (above); Katie Kirkpatrick (right), dean of instruction, developed a step-by-step framework -- described below -- for teaching students basic critical-thinking skills. Credit: Zachary Fink Gold Standard PBL: Essential Project Design Elements Adapted from Setting the Standard for Project Based Learning: A Proven Approach to Rigorous Classroom Instruction, by John Larmer, John Mergendoller, Suzie Boss (ASCD 2015). This post is also available as a downloadable article. It’s encouraging that Project Based Learning is becoming popular, but popularity can bring problems. Here at the Buck Institute for Education, we’re concerned that the recent upsurge of interest in PBL will lead to wide variation in the quality of project design and classroom implementation. If done well, PBL yields great results. But if PBL is not done well, two problems are likely to arise.

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