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Welcome to the Usability Body of Knowledge

Welcome to the Usability Body of Knowledge

http://www.usabilitybok.org/

Related:  Design thinking & Learning designUX references

Teaching Design Thinking: Units and Advice from Educators By Kelby Zenor, Rubicon International Teaching kids to think is a fun but challenging topic. Students need to be able to take in ideas, process them, and then distill them into new ideas. However, how students learn to think can be vastly different, and unique to the person teaching them. This idea spurred us to look for “how” teachers get students to think, broaden their scope of understanding, and problem solve. We were amazed at the diverse inclusion of the Design Thinking Process into units of instruction. UX Research Talks by Tomer Sharon Lisbon UX Cocktail Hour 2014 (Hangout, Lisbon, Portugal) Entrepreneurs have no time and budget to spend on learning from their users. They perceive customer research as something that is academic, involves white robes, round glasses, binders, and rats. When they do wish to learn from users, they usually interview their sister. And of course she loves their idea. That said, startup founders are constantly asking themselves important questions about their customers.

Design for Extreme Affordability Project Launched: Extreme Team in 2007, company formed in 2008 Current Status: First version of the product launched in 2011, for clinical settings, and is currently being distributed to clinics in South India, where dozens of babies have already been impacted. Partnerships have been formed with several multinational organizations to distribute the product. The Embrace team consists of 35 people, primarily located in Bangalore, India. The organization has received numerous accolades, including the INDEX People’s Choice Award, the largest international design competition.

Personas: The Foundation of a Great User Experience Today's consumers are demanding more from companies. Customers expect products, services, and information that are timely and catered to their specific needs and desires. Traditionally, companies develop and market products based on market segmentation and demographics, assuming that the features, functionality and messaging will meet the needs of all of the customers in that demographic—a "one size fits all" mentality. 45 Design Thinking Resources For Educators 45 Design Thinking Resources For Educators Imagine a world where digital learning platforms help adult learners succeed through college completion; where a network of schools offers international-quality education, affordable tuition, and serves hundreds of thousands of children in economically disadvantaged countries; where we engage parents in understanding national trends and topics in education; where a comprehensive learning environment seamlessly connects the classroom with the opportunities of the digital world for young students; and where system-level solutions help more students gain access to college. Educators across the world have been using design thinking to create such a world. Design thinking consists of four key elements: Defining the Problem, Creating and Considering Multiple Options, Refining Selected Directions, and Executing the Best Plan of Action.

How to choose the right UX metrics for your product When designing for the web, you can analyze usage data for your product and compare different interfaces in A/B tests. This is sometimes called “data-driven design”, but I prefer to think of it as data-informed design — the designer is still driving, not the data. To make this work in practice it’s important to use the right metrics. Basic traffic metrics (like overall page views or number of unique users) are easy to track and give a good baseline on how your site is doing, but they are often not very useful for evaluating the impact of UX changes. This is because they are very general, and usually don’t relate directly to either the quality of the user experience or the goals of your project — it’s hard to make them actionable. I’m part of a group of quantitative UX researchers at Google, and we like to think of large-scale data analysis as just another UX research method.

Is Design Thinking Missing From ADDIE? SumoMe Even though a crucial part of our jobs involve design, the prevailing instructional design models are based on systems thinking. Systems thinking promotes an analytical or engineering type of mindset. But we also need an approach to help us synthesize, innovate and create. In many design fields today, people who are required to create on demand use a design thinking model for this purpose. Why Do Organizations Have Trouble Embracing Qualitative Research? Because the business world shuns uncertainty, qualitative research gets twisted so that the conclusions sound like they were deduced, and their validity unimpeachable. Business research adheres to its cousin in the laboratory, where validity is determined by empirical evidence—which is a positivistic view. But, positivism is not embraced universally in the social sciences, and it is certainly not compatible with inductive reasoning. So why do businesses automatically turn to positivism when trying to understand human behavior and reasoning?

ADDIE Model The ADDIE model is the generic process traditionally used by instructional designers and training developers. The five phases—Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation—represent a dynamic, flexible guideline for building effective training and performance support tools. While perhaps the most common design model, there are a number of weaknesses to the ADDIE model which have led to a number of spin-offs or variations. Ray Kurzweil Raymond "Ray" Kurzweil (/ˈkɜrzwaɪl/ KURZ-wyl; born February 12, 1948) is an American author, computer scientist, inventor, futurist, and is a director of engineering at Google. Aside from futurology, he is involved in fields such as optical character recognition (OCR), text-to-speech synthesis, speech recognition technology, and electronic keyboard instruments. He has written books on health, artificial intelligence (AI), transhumanism, the technological singularity, and futurism. Kurzweil is a public advocate for the futurist and transhumanist movements, as has been displayed in his vast collection of public talks, wherein he has shared his primarily optimistic outlooks on life extension technologies and the future of nanotechnology, robotics, and biotechnology.

100 Things You Should Know About People: #60 — Cognitive "Loads" Are The Most "Expensive" Cognitive loads are expensive You are paying bills at your online banking website. You have to think about what bills need to be paid when, look up your balance, decide how much to pay on your credit cards, and push the right buttons to get the payments processed. As you do this task, you are thinking and remembering (cognitive), looking at the screen (visual), and pressing buttons, typing, and moving the mouse (motor).

User Stories: A Foundation for UI Design The design team sits down to share the first round of mockups for a new client’s application. As the team members present their ideas, it becomes clear that everyone has distinctly different ideas about what the app is and how it should function. The meeting quickly turns into more of a discussion about who—rather than what—is right. 67 Ways to Increase Conversion with Cognitive Biases Guest Article by Jeremy Smith NOTE: This post is HUGE. You’ll want to save it as a reference, so we made it easy – download it as a 30-page ebook by clicking here!

The New Voice of YOU: Communicating Through the Digital Interface User Experience Magazine Digital interfaces we own, design, or develop are an extension of our face, our voice, our body, and our words. So every time someone interacts with a device or app it is also an interaction between that person and us—the creators of that interface. When we think about it that way, we can understand the growing call among the UX community for a shift in perspective from “User-Centered Design” to “People-Centered Design.” Direct human communication is not easy. Whether with parents, children, spouses, colleagues, or even the cashier at the supermarket, opportunities for misunderstandings and miscommunication are the norm.

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