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Storyville: Top Ten Best Short Stories Ever

Storyville: Top Ten Best Short Stories Ever
How dare I make a list of the top ten short stories ever, right? Who the hell do I think I am? Well, obviously I’m a fan of fiction, of the short story form. I’m also an author. And I now have my MFA in Creative Writing as well. Does that make me an authority? Most of these stories are heavily anthologized or are available in a collection by that author. In no particular order: 1. If you want to know what contemporary literary horror looks like, this is the place to go. Buy I Hate To See That Evening Sun Go Down: Collected Stories from Amazon.com 2. For many people, this may be the only bit of her writing that they've ever read. 3. I’ve always been a fan of JCO, and her writing is literary fiction that isn’t afraid to take you over the cliff, never to return. 4. If you haven’t read his collection Jesus’ Son, by all means pick it up now. 5. You knew I’d have at least one of King’s stories on this list. 6. 7. This one you may have read in high school or college, and that’s okay! 8. 9. 10.

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10 Websites Where You Can Enjoy Reading Short Stories and Flash Fiction Do you feel that shorter attention spans are giving short stories a leg up? I personally don’t feel so, because a story well-told is a story well-enjoyed, short or stretched. Short stories have always been a popular form of writing. It is also the cloth where a wannabe writer cuts his first teeth. Many of our greatest authors have also inked memorable short stories.

Hares in the Old Plantation: a short story by Kevin Barry Illustration by Laura Carlin Listen – There’s a lock-in at the Connaught Arms, and every melodious old soak in town is inside the place, wall-eyed with drink and songful as crows – it’s three in the morning – and the liquid drunken notes float off and above the town – there are no women to be heard – and from the dark of the alleyway I can name each voice as it rises and taunts, and who have we now, cresting the happy babble, but Mr Cremins – Mr Teddy Cremins of the square jaw and the emotional shoulders – and he rants directions to the Highwood quarry at the top of his burly throttle: “Oh no, no, no, no, no! You’d go past the Proddy church and take the left, you’d go along by the Moriarty house . . .”

10 best short-story collections of 2015 Posted by Trisha on December 03, 2015 This year was a stellar one for short fiction. In addition to releases from celebrated practitioners of the form, like Kelly Link and Edith Pearlman, it also saw the emergence of fresh, exciting voices—and a short story collection even managed to nab the National Book Award. These 10 collections were standouts for us.

7 Short Stories by Junot Díaz Free Online, In Text and Audio As much as any contemporary writer of literary fiction ever does, Junot Díaz has become something of a household name in the years since his debut novel, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao appeared in 2007, then went on to win the Pulitzer Prize, among other many other honors. The novel has recently topped critics lists of the best 21st century novels (so far), and the recognition is well-deserved, and very hard-won. Díaz spent a decade writing the book, his process, in the words of The New York Times’ Sam Anderson, “notoriously slow” and laborious. But none of his time working on Oscar Wao, it seems, was spent idle. During the long gestation period between his first book of stories, 1996’s Drown, his first novel, and the many accolades to follow, Diaz has reliably turned out short stories for the likes of The New Yorker, culminating in his most recent collection from 2012, This Is How You Lose Her. Related Content:

9 classic horror stories you can read right now 1. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, by Washington Irving (1820) There's a good chance you read Washington Irving's classic short story in high school. But the surprise success of Fox's new TV series loosely based on the story is a great excuse to go back and reread the original. The story follows the meek Ichabod Crane as he contends with the town bully, Brom Bones, for the hand of Katrina Van Tassel — but an appearance by the legendary Headless Horseman threatens to tip the scales in Brom's favor. This sequestered glen has long been known by the name of Sleepy Hollow, and its rustic lads are called the Sleepy Hollow Boys throughout all the neighboring country.

The Short Story Podcasts Broadening the number of resources The Short Story brings its readers, we are extremely pleased to provide this set of podcasts, courtesy of the Florida Centre of Instructional Technologies (FCIT) from the University of South Florida (USF). In due time, we hope to provide a greater number and range of podcasts to TSS. If you would like to offer your own recordings, please contact us as at info@theshortstory.co.uk to discuss the details. This set of twenty five short story podcasts is from Sherwood Anderson’s influential short story collection Winesburg, Ohio (1919). Source: Anderson, S. (1919) Winesburg, Ohio. New York, NY: B.W.

Fiction Archives Our privacy promise The New Yorker's Strongbox is designed to let you communicate with our writers and editors with greater anonymity and security than afforded by conventional e-mail. When you visit or use our public Strongbox server at The New Yorker and our parent company, Condé Nast, will not record your I.P. address or information about your browser, computer, or operating system, nor will we embed third-party content or deliver cookies to your browser. Strongbox servers are under the physical control of The New Yorker and Condé Nast.

Another Cotton Picking Day! by Norris Chambers (Old Timer's Tales) Very few people under the age of "Senior Citizen" have ever picked cotton. The cotton patch is now harvested by machine, about the same way as grain, potatoes and other back breaking gatherings. But it wasn't always that way. Cotton matured in the early Fall, and when it matured, that was the time to pick it. Cotton was the primary money crop for most small farmers. There were many things that could happen to keep the cotton crop small. Read 19 Short Stories From Nobel Prize-Winning Writer Alice Munro Free Online Calling her a “master of the contemporary short story,” the Swedish Academy awarded 82-year-old Alice Munro the Nobel Prize in Literature today. It is well-deserved, and hard-earned (and comes not long after she announced her retirement from fiction). After 14 story collections, Munro has reached at least a couple generations of writers with her psychologically subtle stories about ordinary men and women in Huron County, Ontario, her birthplace and home. Only the 13th woman writer to win the Nobel, Munro has previously won the Man Booker Prize in 2009, the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction in Canada three times (1968, 1978, and 1986), and two O. Henry Awards (2006 and 2008). Her regional fiction draws as much from her Ontario surroundings as does the work of the very best so-called “regional” writers, and captivating interactions of character and landscape tend drive her work more so than intricate plotting.

New look for the short story Some of the UK's best young novelists are working with computer games designers to create digital short stories, each inspired by a classic work of literature but featuring games, blogs and web tools. The first of the six stories is Charles Cumming's The 21 Steps, based on John Buchan's classic thriller The 39 Steps. It uses Google Maps and Google Earth to follow the trail of a bewildered young Londoner who witnesses a murder and is forced to smuggle a mysterious liquid on to a plane.

Short Story Month: Best short stories to read online for free May is Short Story Month, a celebration of bite-size fiction. Fill your day with a tale or two. "Short stories are tiny windows into other worlds and other minds and other dreams. They are journeys you can make to the far side of the universe and still be back in time for dinner." -Neil Gaiman "Symbols and Signs" by Vladimir Nabokov

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