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Companion Planting

Companion Planting
The following is a list of vegetable and herbs which grow well together and protect one another from insect attack. Many herbs are natural insect repellents that can keep your garden bug free and reduce or eliminate the need for potentially harmful pesticides. By using Companion Planting, many gardeners are discovering that they can discourage garden pests without harming helpful insects such as bees and ladybugs. Some herbs, through their odors or root secretions, will deter pests naturally. An added bonus is; these same herbs, planted as companions in your garden, will season the fruits and vegetables of your labor. Some herbs even improve the flavor or growth rate of their companion vegetables. BASIL: Plant with tomatoes to improve growth and flavor and to repel flies and mosquitoes. BAY LEAF:A fresh leaf bay leaf in each storage container of beans or grains will deter weevils and moths. BEE BALM (Oswego): Plant with tomatoes to improve growth and flavor. CATNIP: Deters flea beetles.

http://www.i4at.org/lib2/complant.htm

General Motors and Partners Create Detroit Urban Garden Using Repurposed Shipping Crates GM’s metal shipping crates were repurposed into raised beds. Photo: John F. Martin for General Motors Growing Tomatoes, Part 1 Tomatoes – you’re either already growing them or you want to. Of all the vegetable comparisons of store-bought vs. homegrown, you likely won’t find a more dramatic difference in taste and quality than what you’ll find with tomatoes. We’ve been growing and canning them for the past few years and while we’ve had good success, there’s something new to be learned and something to be improved on every season.

Plants For A Future : 7000 Edible, Medicinal & Useful Plants Recommended this month New Book ** Edible Perennials: 50 Top perennials from Plants For A Future [Paperback] Current interest in forest or woodland garden designs reflects an awareness that permanent mixed plantings are inherently more sustainable than annual monocultures. 5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants As the outdoor season approaches, many homeowners and outdoor enthusiasts look for ways to control mosquitoes. With all the publicity about the West Nile virus, mosquito repelling products are gaining in popularity. But many commercial insect repellents contain from 5% to 25% DEET. There are concerns about the potential toxic effects of DEET, especially when used by children. Children who absorb high amounts of DEET through insect repellents have developed seizures, slurred speech, hypotension and bradycardia. There are new DEET-free mosquito repellents on the market today which offer some relief to those venturing outdoors in mosquito season.

Aquaponics 4 You - Step-By-Step How To Build Your Own Aquaponics System “Break-Through Organic Gardening Secret Grows You Up To 10 Times The Plants, In Half The Time, With Healthier Plants, While the "Fish" Do All the Work...” Imagine a Garden Where There's No More Weeds or Soil Pests, No Tilling or Cultivating, No Fertilizer Spreading or Compost Shredding, No Manure Spreading or Irrigating, and No Tractor Shed Required... And Yet... Your Plants Grow Abundantly, Taste Amazing, and Are Extremely Healthy.

Insect Hotels Insect Hotels Provide a home to pollinators and pest controllers. Tidy gardens, lawns and lack of dead wood, mean less and less habitat for wild bees, spiders and ladybugs. Make a compost tumbler More Go Green! projects Here’s how to tumble your way to rich compost for your garden and plants. Sturdy plastic 55-gallon (or so) food barrelDrillSawHammerAdjustable wrench8 3⁄8-by-3 1⁄2-inch carriage bolts8 3⁄8-inch nuts8 3⁄8-inch washers16d galvanized nails2 bungee cords (If barrel has a locking lid, you won’t need the bungees.)5 2-by-6-inch boards (Lengths will be determined by the size of the container.)3⁄4-inch galvanized pipe, threaded both ends (You can get a standard-size pre-cut threaded pipe.

Planning Succession Crops Succession planting will allow you to plant several times throughout the growing season for a continuous supply of fresh vegetables. To plan succession crops you must know two things: • The number of weeks of growing season in your garden. The length of the growing season is the number weeks between the last frost in spring and the first frost in autumn. The local cooperative extension office can tell you the length of the growing season in your location or you can ask an experienced gardener at a nearby garden center.

10 Simple, Cheap Home Gardening Innovations to Set You on the Path to Food Independence Alex Pietrowski, Staff WriterWaking Times The issue of food quality and food independence is of critical importance these days, and people are recognizing just how easy and fun it is to grow your own food at home. When renegade gardener Ron Finley said, “growing your own food is like printing money,” he was remarking on the revolutionary nature of re-establishing control over your health and your pocket book as a means of subverting the exploitative and unhealthy food systems that encourage the over-consumption of processed and fast foods. Thanks to the internet, the availability of parts and materials, and good old-fashioned ingenuity, there is a wide range of in-home, and in-apartment, gardening systems that are easy to construct and maintain, and that can provide nutritious, organic, and low-cost food for you and your family. Aquaponics

Grow 100 lbs. Of Potatoes In 4 Square Feet: {How To Quite the clever gardening tip here folks! Today’s feature includes tips from three different sources for growing potatoes vertically (in layers) instead of spread out in rows across your garden. If you have limited garden space or want to try some nifty gardening magic, this could be a great option for you. First, there’s this article from The Seattle Times: It’s Not Idaho, But You Still Can Grow Potatoes: The potatoes are planted inside the box, the first row of boards is installed and the dirt or mulch can now be added to cover the seed potatoes. As the plant grows, more boards and dirt will be added. Extreme Urban Gardening: Straw Bale Gardens Here’s a very simple technique for gardening in tight spots and in places with no/terrible soil (from the arctic circle to the desert to an asphalt jungle). It’s also a great way to garden if you have limited mobility (in a wheel chair). What is Straw Bale Gardening?

How to Grow and Store Potatoes, Onions, Garlic and Squash, Keeper Crops During the winter months, when the ground is covered by a thick blanket of snow, there’s something particularly satisfying about still being able to eat food from your garden. There are many summer-grown crops including potatoes, onions, garlic, beets, carrots and winter squash, can be stored with relative ease to nourish you right through until the next growing season. Even a modest-size garden can yield a substantial crop of winter keepers. To be successful storing these keeper crops at home, here are a couple factors to keep in mind: Some varieties store better than others, so be sure to seek out the ones that are known to be good keepers.

7 No-Cost Ways To Grow More Food From Your Garden When I wrote a post about products that help promote soil biodiversity, some commenters were skeptical about commercial products that are shipped long distances with all the packaging and waste that goes with them. They may have a point. After all, the secrets of healthy soil usually start at home. And many of them are free. Here are some of our favorites normanack/CC BY 2.0 Vegetables to grow in winter With the help of a bit of cover, and carefully selected varieties of seeds, it is possible to grow vegetables and herbs all year round in the United Kingdom, and presumably therefore in other temperate countries that have frosty winters.In my corner of Scotland, away from the sea and up in the hills, there is only one month of the year that can be guaranteed to be frost free and that is July. Most years we cannot grow courgettes or runner beans outside without cover. In our case, experimenting has paid off and we often have more produce in winter than in summer.

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