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David Graeber

David Graeber
David Rolfe Graeber (/ˈɡreɪbər/; born 12 February 1961) is an American anthropologist, author, anarchist and activist who is currently Professor of Anthropology at the London School of Economics.[1] Specialising in theories of value and social theory, he was an assistant professor and associate professor of anthropology at Yale University from 1998 to 2007, although Yale controversially declined to rehire him.[2] From Yale, he went on to become a Reader in Social Anthropology at Goldsmiths, University of London from Fall 2007 to Summer 2013.[3] Graeber has been involved in social and political activism, including the protests against the 3rd Summit of the Americas in Quebec City in 2001 and the World Economic Forum in New York City in 2002. He is also a leading figure in the Occupy Wall Street movement. Early life[edit] Graeber graduated from Phillips Academy Andover in 1978 and received his B.A. from the State University of New York at Purchase in 1984. Academia[edit] Authorship[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Graeber

Related:  David Graeber - Yale University - not just CUNYThesis - Exploration of Value

Without Cause: Yale Fires An Acclaimed Anarchist Scholar David Graeber, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Yale University, and the author of Toward an Anthropological Theory of Value: The False Coin of Our Own Dreams and Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology, among many other scholarly publications. Last week Prof. Graeber was informed that his teaching contract at Yale would not be extended. However, it was not Graeber’s scholarship that was ever in question; rather it was his political philosophies that may have played a heavy hand in the administration’s unwarranted decision. Graeber, a renowned anarchist scholar, recently spoke with CounterPuncher JOSHUA FRANK about the fiasco. As one of our other favorite anthropologists David Price put it, this "is a ghastly look under the hood at how academic knowledge is manufactured at America’s ‘finest’ institutions."

Political economy In the late 19th century, the term economics came to replace political economy, coinciding with the publication of an influential textbook by Alfred Marshall in 1890.[1] Earlier, William Stanley Jevons, a proponent of mathematical methods applied to the subject, advocated economics for brevity and with the hope of the term becoming "the recognised name of a science."[2][3] Etymology[edit] In the United States, political economy first was taught at the College of William and Mary, where in 1784, Smith's The Wealth of Nations was a required textbook.[5] Current approaches[edit] Micah M. White Micah M. White is a former editor at Adbusters magazine.[1] Micah is credited with being the co-creator, and the only American creator, of the original idea for the Occupy Wall Street protests.[2][3] He lives in Nehalem, Oregon[4] and he is the founder of boutique activist consultancy. He also writes for the UK's The Guardian. Biography[edit] Micah M. White "was born to a Caucasian mother and an African-American father".[3] In middle school, he reportedly refused to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.[3] He attended Grand Blanc Community High School in Grand Blanc, Michigan.

Sociotechnical system Sociotechnical systems (STS) in organizational development is an approach to complex organizational work design that recognizes the interaction between people and technology in workplaces. The term also refers to the interaction between society's complex infrastructures and human behaviour. In this sense, society itself, and most of its substructures, are complex sociotechnical systems. The term sociotechnical systems was coined by Eric Trist, Ken Bamforth and Fred Emery, World War II era, based on their work with workers in English coal mines at the Tavistock Institute in London.[1] Sociotechnical systems pertains to theory regarding the social aspects of people and society and technical aspects of organizational structure and processes.

Kalle Lasn Kalle Lasn (Estonian pronunciation: [ˈkɑlˑɛ ˈlɑsn̥]) (born March 24, 1942) is an Estonian-Canadian film maker, author, magazine editor and activist. Near the end of World War II his family fled Estonia and Lasn spent some time in a German refugee camp. At age seven he was resettled in Australia with his family, where he grew up and remained until the late 1960s, attending school in Canberra. David Graeber Fired From Yale Because of Politics By Yvonne After a decision at a meeting convened by tenured faculty at the department of anthropology, Yale University, David Graeber’s contract was not renewed. This is not a situation of David being denied tenure, but rather that the extension of his contract has been denied, and this is an extremely rare situation. In light of his exemplary scholarship and mentoring, many of David’s students and colleagues strongly support his continuing at Yale. To this end we have created an open petition. As the review process of the decision is going to take place very soon, we request you to support this endeavor by signing this petition as soon as possible. We would also appreciate any other support that you are able to provide.

Disruptive innovation Sustaining innovations are typically innovations in technology, whereas disruptive innovations cause changes to markets. For example, the automobile was a revolutionary technological innovation, but it was not a disruptive innovation, because early automobiles were expensive luxury items that did not disrupt the market for horse-drawn vehicles. The market for transportation essentially remained intact until the debut of the lower priced Ford Model T in 1908. The mass-produced automobile was a disruptive innovation, because it changed the transportation market. The automobile, by itself, was not.

Liberty Square Blueprint The Liberty Square Blueprint was an Occupy Wall Street manifesto[1] consisting in a collection of loosely defined goals authored by about 250 protesters.[2] It was started around the beginning of October 2011 as a wiki style document.[3] As of October 18, 2011, the Blueprint had 11 core visions including: embracing open-source technology,ending all wars,eliminating "discrimination and prejudice," andreappropriating "our business structures and culture, putting people and our Earth before profit. It also had specific goals for New York City. Supporters of the Liberty Square Blueprint saw it as an alternative to the 99 Percent Declaration which they regarded as too specific and short term.[4][5]

InsideHE: Early Exit Yale University is getting rid of a popular anthropology professor, setting off protests from supporters who believe he is losing his job for being an anarchist and for visibly backing graduate student unionization. As the professor considers filing a formal grievance with the university, anthropologists and labor officials nationwide have already organized an online petition signed by 3,000 people. The decision not to renew David Graeber’s contract after the end of the 2005-6 academic year was made in a private meeting of 12 senior faculty members who are required to keep the proceedings confidential. ( Inside Higher Ed contacted several who said they could not comment.)

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