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Bag Your Jacket Lining

Bag Your Jacket Lining
Lining a jacket makes it last longer and become easier to slip on and off. Best yet, using the bagging method is as quick or quicker than finishing an unlined jacket. Photo: Sloan Howard. by Sandra Millettfrom Threads #88, pp. 56-59 Sewing jackets is something I like to do, but lining them is another matter. Prepare to bag All jackets benefit from having a lining; it lets the jacket slide easily over other clothes, drape correctly on the body, and stand up to wear and tear. If you're using a pattern without a lining, it's easy to make a lining pattern. The bagging procedure begins only after the jacket and lining have been constructed, but there are a few details to attend to before construction. Since the jacket's seam allowances will be pressed open, don't serge any two seam allowances together, as you might be tempted to do, for example, on the center-back seam. The next step is to create a temporary hem on the jacket. Join lining to jacketReady to sew nonstop? Related:  sewingSewing

Leena's.com: PatternMaker Tutorial Web Site Copyright ©1998-2000 Leena Lähteenmäki, Järvenpää Use PatternMaker ladies' coat/robe macro to draft patterns to this coat. To download and buy macros, please go to the PatternMaker Website. In the macro there are options for two kinds of hoods, normal and integrated. See picture. Iron interfacing to coat's front and back facings, under collar and pocket flaps. Only vertical coat seams need to be overlocked. Cut a seam at the linings CB and add extra width to the seam, to form a pleat. Sew pocket flaps together along the outer edge right side to right side. Sew pockets to the front pieces. Sew a rectangle around the pocket mouth line, sewing through all thicknesses. If you need more instructions of how to sew pockets, refer to the general sewing instructions on this site. Sew the coat's shoulder and side seams. Prepare collar. Place collar on the coat's neckline, with right side of under collar against the coat's right side. Prepare sleeves. Prepare lining. Do the final pressing.

DIY Custom Fabric Labels Custom clothing labels using iron-on transfers (©2005, www.grumperina.com. Updated September 13th, 2010. Information and images contained within this tutorial are copyrighted and cannot be used for any unintended purposes without my explicit permission. E-mail me.) Many people have asked how I make these adorable and completely customized labels for my handknits: It's simple, cheap, creative, and allows me to put the recipient's name, fabric content, care instructions, and even a little cartoon on the label! Click here to proceed with the tutorial: You will need: - inkjet printer - iron (no steam!) - satin ribbon, 5/8" - 1/2" wide, or whatever is suitable for your project - anti-fraying liquid (Fray Check , Fray Block, etc.) - iron-on transfers, whichever are suitable for your printer. Let's get started! You will need to design your label using graphic software. Follow the instructions on your iron-on transfers. You can reuse the same iron-on transfer paper over and over again. Ta da! All done!

Understanding Lining Fabric + Resources This is a follow-up post to this post and again, if you don’t have Easy Guide to Sewing Linings by Connie Long, you need it and you should buy the e-book right now! Today, I wanted to share my online resources plus a few tips on what kinds of fabrics can work as a lining. Sometimes ideas from others make a big difference in how we view the usefulness of a fabric. bemberg rayon lining First let’s talk lining fabrics and what kinds of fabrics work as linings that aren’t labeled “linings.” silk charmeuse solid & printed Let me acquaint you with my favorite luxury lining – silk charmeuse. silk crepe de chine, printed & solid There are other types of silks that work great as linings as well, including crepe de chine and china silk. hammered polyester charmeuse I’ve had a lot of people say that they would love to use “printed linings” more often if they could only find them. from left to right, knit lining and two stretch woven linings What about linings for stretch fabrics?

Seven Essential Sewing Skills Tasia from Sewaholic and Sewaholic Patterns wows us with her incredible style and sewing skills. Her blog is one of our favorite daily reads! Have you seen all of the gorgeous versions of her Lonsdale Dress out there on Flickr, Pinterest and your favorite blogs, all sewn up this past summer? Tasia inspires, and teaches along the way too; she is a fabulous resource for sewing techniques and more on her blog. Hello, everyone! 1. Helpful Links: 2. 3. Some great posts on pressing: 4. Here’s a great list of seam finishes to get you started! 5. There are plenty of zipper tutorials out there, but here are some great ones: 6. 7. « Hooded Tunic Tutorial Announcing: October Holiday Sew-Alongs + Giveaways »

Sewing School Welcome to the Sewing School! I get a lot of emails and comments asking about how to do certain sewing related things and where to find old posts on my blog and so in an effort to consolidate the tutorials and sewing advice you find here on A Fashionable Stitch, I’ve made up this handy dandy Table of Contents page to navigate you through what’s available here. It’s due to be added to every now and then, so check back when you are searching for something and can’t find it. Making a muslin or a test garment (also known as a toile) is a great way to find out if certain alterations are needed for a particular pattern. Alterations for Pants/Trousers Getting a pair of pants or trousers to fit perfectly can be one of the hardest fittings we ever do as sewists. Flat Pattern Adjustments Flat Pattern Adjustments are adjustments made to the pattern before you make a muslin. Ready to add a few techniques to your to your sewing box? Hemming Need a little direction on how to mark a hem?

How To Sew Darts - Coletterie For beginners, sewing darts tends to seem like a complicated step. I know that I was confused about getting a straight line and ending right at the point. Double pointed darts seemed even more confusing. Straight Dart Straight darts have only one point with dart legs along the edge of the pattern. 1. 2. 3. Curved Dart Curved darts are often used around the bust as they can be very flattering. 1. 2. 3. Double Point Dart Double point darts tend to be found on dresses with simple lines. 1. 2. 3. 4. Fused Interfacing: Tailor's Tricks Block Fusing is a method that many modern tailors and home-sewists use to apply interfacing to fashion fabric yardage before the pattern pieces are cut out. Have you ever struggled keeping the interfacing layer from slipping off-grain as you attempt to fuse it to your fabric yardage? Next time, try this fast, easy, and accurate method that I learned from a Master Tailor, called "SPOT-FUSING"...And it can be done right on your cutting table! First, we need to prepare the surface of the table. Next, lay out your fashion fabric on top of your "padded" table, WRONG side UP...making SURE it is smooth. Now lay your Interfacing FUSIBLE Side DOWN on the (wrong side) of the fashion fabric, making sure it is smooth and on grain. This is where the Spot-Fusing happens :) USING a thin PRESS CLOTH, and your steam iron set to a low-wool setting, start moving your iron over the interfacing with an UP and DOWN motion. Labels: Professional Sewing Supplies, Sewing Notions, Tips / Techniques

Free Pattern Fitting Series Pattern Fitting Series I am presenting a pattern fitting series entitled "My Approach to Successful Pattern Fitting". This series is written and produced solely by myself and all of the content is offered from my experience in the Fashion Industry and tailored to appeal to a DIY Sewist/Sewer. I hope that if you've had a difficult time with fitting yourself in the past that you will find my information helpful. If you'd like to read my opening post about the series I'm currently writing it's here.

Zippered inner bag pocket **UPDATE** If you'd like this tutorial (or any of my others) in PDF format click here. Note: to view the PDF tutorial, you will need the latest Adobe Viewer program. Get the latest version of the viewer absolutely free by clicking on the button below: Here is a tutrorial for zippered pockets inside bags. They look smart, they prevent your valuables from going 'walkies', they make essentials such as lippy and your mirror easy to get at, and a girl can never have too many pockets in her bag! A zippered pocket in one of the lining pieces of my bag-to-be. Here's how I put it together Shopping list (as if you were buying from a shop, if not using stash fabrics 0.5 yard of fabric for pocket0.5 yard of Vilene Firm Iron-on1x 7" Zip Click on any of the pictures to make them bigger. 1. Iron the same sized interfacing onto the wrong side of pocket pieces. Sew some stitches around the end of the zip to secure the zip halves (as shown in the pic) Sew this end of the zip together. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Old Sewing Machine Maintenance According to the old Singer parts lists, that big spokey wheel on the end of your vintage Singer is the balance wheel. According to most folks who use a vintage Singer it’s the handwheel, so it’s the handwheel as far as we’re concerned here, and we’ll be looking at its removal and replacement, with a bit of a detour on the way. But why, pray, would anyone want to take the thing off? Well, you could be taking a machine apart because it’s in a disgusting state and cleaning it will be so much easier if you take off some of its bits. Or maybe you want to change the handwheel for a different one? “The clutch?” Well, the clutch is what lives behind that big chromed knob in the middle of your handwheel, and without the clutch your machine would be nowhere near as user-friendly as it is. That upping-and-downing is the motion, which you stop by unscrewing the stop motion clamp screw when you want to wind a bobbin. As you take the chromed knob off, one of two things will happen.

How to sew flat lining One of my favourite sewing techniques is flat lining. Flat lining is used extensively in historical (particularly 19th century) sewing and couture sewing, but it’s a technique that is not frequently taught or used in modern sewing books or patterns, which is a pity, because it’s awesome, and opens up many possibilities for design techniques and fabric use. I used it to make thin, flimsy fabrics strong enough to make corsets and jackets out of, and to make bodices that shape and hide squish without adding bulk and weight. Though the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, flat lining is not quite the same thing as interlining. These days (according to Shaeffer’s Sewing for the Apparel Industry) interlining is used to mean the same thing to as interfacing, whereas flat lining is an underlining, and is never fused. When picking a flat lining fabric, pick a fabric that, when it is combined with your outer fabric, will have all the qualities that you want the finished piece to have.

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