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Body language, not facial expressions, broadcasts what's happening to us

Body language, not facial expressions, broadcasts what's happening to us
If you think that you can judge by examining someone's facial expressions if he has just hit the jackpot in the lottery or lost everything in the stock market -- think again. Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at New York University and Princeton University have discovered that -- despite what leading theoretical models and conventional wisdom might indicate -- it just doesn't work that way. Rather, they found that body language provides a better cue in trying to judge whether an observed subject has undergone strong positive or negative experiences. In a study published this week in the journal Science, the researchers present data showing that viewers in test groups were baffled when shown photographs of people who were undergoing real-life, highly intense positive and negative experiences. The study was led by Dr. Hillel Aviezer of the Psychology Department of the Hebrew University, together with Dr.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121129143314.htm

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Pamela Meyer: How to Spot a Liar TED and The Huffington Post are excited to bring you TEDWeekends, a curated weekend program that introduces a powerful "idea worth spreading" every Friday, anchored in an exceptional TEDTalk. This week's TEDTalk is accompanied by an original blog post from the featured speaker, along with new op-eds, thoughts and responses from the HuffPost community. Watch the talk above, read the blog post and tell us your thoughts below. Become part of the conversation! Watch Pamela Meyer's talk above about the science of "lie spotting" and how it can lead to a more honest world. Lying: Even t-shirts know how bad it is.

7 Morning Hacks to Jumpstart Your Day I’ll be the first to admit that I’m really not a morning person. I’ve tried to get myself going in the early hours of the morning, but I’ve always been more of a night owl – my creative juices seem to flow better in the later hours. So I’d be the last person to suggest that you need to force yourself out of bed before your body and mind are really ready to do so. But when you do get up, you may find that you’re pressed for time and have fallen behind the rest of the crowd in what you need to get done during the day. A slow start to your day won’t help anyone, let alone you.

The Lost Art of Eye Contact We’ve stopped seeing each other. You and me. All of us. Our eyes may indeed be windows to our soul, but with our necks craned downward and our eyes focused on tiny handheld screens, who can tell? We hardly make an effort to look at the person we’re talking to anymore. Younger people, in general, find it challenging to maintain eye contact with adults. How to tell if someone is telling a lie or lying: Viewzone We have all met people who were dishonest and avoided eye contact. It has been said that "the eyes are the mirror if the soul." Many people know that their eyes betray their lies.

Test your social intelligence Test how well you can read emotions of others just by looking at their eyes. The ability to read the emotions of others is linked to "social intelligence" which, in turn, is linked to performance on team-based problem solving tasks. Try it! This is an implementation of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test developed by prof. This column will change your life: The emotional calendar The Harvard neuropsychiatrist John Sharp spends a month with his family each summer on the island of Nantucket, so it was doubly problematic that year after year, halfway through, he'd start to feel inexplicably anxious and grouchy: first because a month on Nantucket isn't exactly anything to complain about, and second because he's a neuropsychiatrist; explaining bad moods is his job. It took much beach-front speculation, he recalls, before he finally made the connection to his teenage self, nervous about the new school year. Deep inside (actually, we can be more specific: in his hippocampus), he was still a frightened schoolboy. His moods were at the mercy of the calendar.

How to Detect Lies - body language, reactions, speech patterns Interesting Info -> Lying Index -> How to Detect Lies Become a Human Lie Detector (Part 1) Warning: sometimes ignorance is bliss. After gaining this knowledge, you may be hurt when it is obvious that someone is lying to you. The following deception detection techniques are used by police, forensic psychologists, security experts and other investigators. Introduction to Detecting Lies: Gestures tell us much Gestures Offer Insight By Ipke Wachsmuth October 2006 Hand and arm movements do much more than accent words; they provide context for understanding Our body movements always convey something about us to other people. The body "speaks" whether we are sitting or standing, talking or just listening. On a blind date, how the two individuals position themselves tells a great deal about how the evening will unfold: Is she leaning in to him or away?

Annie Murphy Paul: What Your Eyes Say About How You Think And Learn As you read these words, try paying attention to something you usually never notice: the movements of your eyes. While you scan these lines of text, or glance at that ad over there or look up from the screen at the room beyond, your eyes are making tiny movements, called saccades, and brief pauses, called fixations. Scientists are discovering that eye movement patterns — where we look, and for how long — reveals important information about how we read, how we learn and even what kind of people we are.

4 secrets to reading body language like an expert: How important is body language? 55% of what you convey when you speak comes from body language. In fact, when you’re speaking about something emotional only about 7% of what the other person hears has to do with the words you use. More often than not you can tell what a politician thinks about an issue just by watching their hands.

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