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Hack Education

Hack Education
This is a book review of José Vilson's new book, This Is Not a Test. This is not a bildungsroman. Not in the way the genre is traditionally defined. As such, it disrupts expectations about whose stories of "coming of age" get told, who is a subject (not an object) in the classroom -- as a teacher, as a student. The subtitle of the book is "a new narrative on race, class, and education." I'm incredibly honored to be the first to get to review the book.

http://www.hackeducation.com/

Related:  Connected Education & New Technologies

2012 Paris OER Declaration Ms. Catherine Ngugi.. and Letuimanu’asina Dr. Emma KRUSE VA’AI / Mariana Bittencourt / CC BY Through the generous support of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and in full partnership with the Commonwealth of Learning (COL), UNESCO hosted the 2012 World Open Educational Resources (OER) Congress last week to: How To Become A Hacker Copyright © 2001 Eric S. Raymond As editor of the Jargon File and author of a few other well-known documents of similar nature, I often get email requests from enthusiastic network newbies asking (in effect) "how can I learn to be a wizardly hacker?". Back in 1996 I noticed that there didn't seem to be any other FAQs or web documents that addressed this vital question, so I started this one.

7 Creative Ideas for Custom Die Cutting You could take a bunch of ordinary business cards, run your thumb across the stack, and never be able to tell the difference between any of them. Meanwhile, a business card that uses custom die cutting is unmistakable in both look and feel; you can’t help but notice it. The captivating effect of custom die cuts doesn’t end with business cards — it applies to folders, brochures, postcards and any other bit of print media a designer might need to create for a client. Teach with Portals » About About The Teach with Portals program offers free content, information and tools to help educators build innovative curricula. Games and tools are delivered through STEAM for SCHOOLS, the school-friendly version of our game distribution service. Educators can learn about and share compelling, engaging and creative content by accessing lesson plans and resources on the Teach with Portals website, and join a teachers-only community forum for peer support and problem-solving. Become part of a movement that shares ideas, methods and experiences to teach students in profound new ways.

Why the World Need Hackers Now: The Link Between Open Source Development & Cultural Evolution I’ve been brushing up on the work of Eric S. Raymond, an open source software advocate and author of ‘The Cathedral and the Bazaar,’ in preparation for meeting and interviewing him at next week’s Culture Conference in Philly and Boston. Raymond has written extensively about the attitudes and ethos of hackers, the mechanisms of open-source development, and the relationship between motivation and reputation in a gift economy. As I read his stuff, I see a strong parallel between how hacker culture can apply to culture hacking, and functionally accelerate personal and social evolution at scale. So let’s start with the hacker attitude: (excerpted from Raymond’s essay How to Become a Hacker) 1.

Open as in door or open as in heart? #mooc A note on the end of Steve Carson’s post about MOOCs and the liberal arts prompted a brief conversation about the two different meanings of “MOOC” with Brandon Muramatsu. Steve’s original post drew (based on his conversation with Brandon) a distinction between the Edx/Coursera/Udacity “MOOCs” and the Change11/ds106/wileyMOOC “MOOCs” – he suggested using MOCs as a description of the former (as they are not, in the strictest sense, open). But Brandon felt, on reflection, that the real distinction concerned how massive the courses were. As a primer for those of you who read this but don’t live it (you lucky people!)

The Hacker's Ethics The idea of a "hacker ethic" is perhaps best formulated in Steven Levy's 1984 book, Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution. Levy came up with six tenets: Access to computers - and anything which might teach you omething about the way the world works - should be unlimited and total. Always yield to the Hands-On imperative! All information should be free. Duplication theory of educational value Higher education faces a value crisis. Value is a fuzzy concept. In theory, I can purchase a $3 steak that isn’t a good value. Or a $20 hamburger that is a great value. Similarly, I could purchase a house for $500k that was a great value pre-2008 and is suddenly a terrible value in 2011. With physical objects, value is based on what you receive in relation to what you spend.

White hat (computer security) Ethical Hacking One of the first instances of an ethical hack being used was a "security evaluation" conducted by the United States Air Force of the Multics operating systems for "potential use as a two-level (secret/top secret) system." Their evaluation found that while Multics was "significantly better than other conventional systems,"[citation needed] it also had "... vulnerabilities in hardware security, software security and procedural security"[citation needed] that could be uncovered with "a relatively low level of effort."[citation needed] The authors performed their tests under a guideline of realism, so that their results would accurately represent the kinds of access that an intruder could potentially achieve. They performed tests that were simple information-gathering exercises, as well as other tests that were outright attacks upon the system that might damage its integrity. Clearly, their audience wanted to know both results. Some other methods of carrying out these include:

You Can Easily Learn 100 TED Talks Lessons In 5 Minutes Which Most People Need 70 Hours For The other week I watched 70 hours of TED talks; short, 18-minute talks given by inspirational leaders in the fields of Technology,Entertainment, and Design (TED). I watched 296 talks in total, and I recently went through the list of what I watched, weeded out the crappy and boring talks, and created a list of the 100 best things I learned ! This article isn’t entirely about productivity, but I guarantee you’ll learn a thing or two.

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