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Inside Insides

Inside Insides
Sorry it's been so long since a new fruit! The list of unique fruits and vegetables is getting thin. I'm always open to some suggestions! Drop me an email if you can think of anything I should scan (fruit, veg or flower particularly) This beast is the Jackfruit. Although it doesn't show in the scan, this thing is massive. 22 lbs and about a foot and a half tall, I barely could fit it in any of my coils.

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Alexander Chen – Conductor: mta.me Project summary At www.mta.me, Conductor turns the New York subway system into an interactive string instrument. Using the MTA’s actual subway schedule, the piece begins in realtime by spawning trains which departed in the last minute, then continues accelerating through a 24 hour loop. The visuals are based on Massimo Vignelli’s 1972 diagram. Romney Proudly Explains How He's Turned Campaign Around BOSTON—For weeks many Beltway insiders had written off the Romney campaign as dead, saying the candidate had dug himself into too deep a hole with too little time to recover. However, with a month to go before ballots are cast, Romney has pulled even with President Obama, and the former Massachusetts governor credits his rejuvenated campaign to one, singular tactic: lying a lot. “I’m lying a lot more, and my lies are far more egregious than they’ve ever been,” a smiling Romney told reporters while sitting in the back of his campaign bus, adding that when faced with a choice to either lie or tell the truth, he will more than likely lie. “It’s a strategy that works because when I lie, I’m essentially telling people what they want to hear, and people really like hearing things they want to hear. Even if they sort of know that nothing I’m saying is true.”

Scientists invent transparent soil to reveal the secret life of plants Lettuce grown in transparent soil developed by researchers at the James Hutton Institute and the University of Abertay Dundee in Scotland Most people’s image of plants is actually upside down. For most of our photosynthetic friends, the majority of the plant is underground in the form of an intricate system of roots. The bit that sticks up is almost an afterthought. That’s a problem for scientists trying to study plants because growing them in media that allow you to see the roots, such as hydroponics, doesn't mimic real soil very well. Where are the billionaires? [Jordi Planas Manzano] Found via FastCoDesign Each circle represents a billionaire but when appropriate the company that they associated with is labeled. And of course United States leads the way with number of billionaires. I liked seeing the data presented on a map; having a geographic distribution shows off the number of non-US billionaires. It would have been nice to see their net worth included in the infographic.

Physicists Find Evidence That The Universe Is A 'Giant Brain' The idea of the universe as a 'giant brain' has been proposed by scientists - and science fiction writers - for decades. But now physicists say there may be some evidence that it's actually true. In a sense. Great Pyramids of Giza in Egypt - the Seventh Wonder of the Ancient World Arabian proverb says, "Everything in the world is afraid of time, and time is afraid of the pyramids". A year ago Sergey Semenov tried to rent a helicopter in Cairo to shoot the pyramids. It didn't work. "No photos allowed due of the close proximity of the military base" such was the explanation. However there was positive news — a story of a French science enthusiast, who bribed local guides and got on top of a pyramid with his equipment to measure some magnetic fields.

Declassified at Last: Air Force's Supersonic Flying Saucer Schematics A cutaway sketch of a 1950s design proposal for the USAF's Project 1794.All photos: National Archives A cutaway sketch of an alternative design proposal for the USAF Project 1794 prototype. An artistic impression of what the finished USAF Project 1794 flying saucer might have looked like.Video: A USAF saucer in flight – sort of. A cutaway sketch of a 1950s design proposal for the USAF's Project 1794.All photos: National ArchivesA cutaway sketch of an alternative design proposal for the USAF Project 1794 prototype.An artistic impression of what the finished USAF Project 1794 flying saucer might have looked like.Video: A USAF saucer in flight – sort of. Officially, aliens have never existed but flying saucers very nearly did. The National Archives has recently published never-before-seen schematics and details of a 1950s military venture, called Project 1794, which aimed to build a supersonic flying saucer.

Biologists learn how plants synthesize their growth hormone auxin Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have succeeded in unraveling, for the first time, the complete chain of biochemical reactions that controls the synthesis of auxin, the hormone that regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Their discovery, detailed in a paper in this week's online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, will allow agricultural scientists to develop new ways to enhance or manipulate auxin production to improve the growth and yield of crops and other plants. More than a century ago, Charles Darwin noticed that plants produced a substance that made them bend toward light, a hormone called auxin that biologists have since found to be essential not only in regulating plant growth but also in patterning their development. In 2006, a team of San Diego researchers headed by Yunde Zhao, an associate professor of biology at UC San Diego, discovered a family of 11 genes involved in the synthesis of auxin.

What BP Could Have Bought With All the Money They Lost Share this infographic on your website, simply copy and paste the source code in the box below to your website. All the Things BP Could Buy With the Money Lost from the Oil Spill: BP could have bought 10 years of clean water for each of the 884 million people in the world without access to it. The cost would be $8.84 billion, or $1 per year per person. BP could also have bought a new home to replace each of the 275,000 lost in Hurricane Katrina.

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