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Explore the Abyss

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15 Deadliest Beach Creatures Keep away from any of these 15 deadly creatures when you next visit the beach. 1. Portuguese Man-of-War Jellyfish Not a true jellyfish, the Portuguese Man-of-War is a siphonophore – a colony of organisms living together. Found mainly far out in the sea, it can be seen swarming or floating with thousands of organisms grouped together. Glow-in-the-dark mushroom rediscovered after 170 years It's something you would never expect to go missing, but one of the world's brightest glow-in-the-dark mushrooms has been rediscovered after an absence of more than 170 years, according to USA Today. The bioluminescent shrooms had become a Brazilian legend of sorts. They were first spied in 1840 by an English botanist named George Gardner, who was alarmed after he saw some boys playing with a glowing object in the streets of Vila de Natividad, a village in the Goiás state in central Brazil. After that, no more sightings of the brightly glowing fungus had ever been reported. The mushroom was nearly forgotten until 2002, when Brazilian chemist Cassius Stevani came across Gardner's early reports. Then, in 2005, a breakthrough occurred.

Census of Marine Life It is the world's largest census, but hasn't been completed yet and probably never will be. The Census of Marine Life, an international project involving hundreds of researchers, has recorded some 185,000 different species so far, from tiny single-cell creatures to the blue whale. The majority of life on our planet swims or crawls in the oceans. Pond-Powered Biofuels: Turning Algae into America's New Energy Just three years ago, Colorado-based inventor Jim Sears shuttered himself in his garage and began tinkering with a design to mass-produce biofuel. His reactor (plastic bags) and his feedstock (algae) may have struck soybean farmers as a laughable gamble. But the experiment worked, and today, Sears' company, Solix Biofuels in Fort Collins, is among several startups betting their futures on the photosynthetic powers of unicellular green goo. The science is simple: Algae need water, sunlight and carbon dioxide to grow. The oil they produce can then be harvested and converted into biodiesel; the algae's carbohydrate content can be fermented into ethanol. Both are much cleaner-burning fuels than petroleum-based diesel or gas.

Ichthyology Ichthyology (from Greek: ἰχθύς, ikhthus, "fish"; and λόγος, logos, "study") is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. This includes skeletal fish (Osteichthyes), cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), and jawless fish (Agnatha). While a large number of species have been discovered and described, approximately 250 new species are officially described by science each year. According to FishBase, 32,200 species of fish had been described by March 2012.[1] There are more fish species than the combined total of all other vertebrates: mammals, amphibians, reptiles and birds.[citation needed] History[edit] Faster-than-light neutrinos could be proof of extra dimensions Similarly, how can I get my ice cream scoops to jump between flavours and manipulate them? Because my wife is always buying Chocolate, but I prefer Strawberry and would like it to be in the shape of a bunny rabbit. Three main issues I see with that. First, neutrinos fluctuate seemingly at random.

The Habitable Planet Unit 12 - Earth's Changing Climate // Online Textbook In its 2007 assessment report the IPCC projected that global average surface temperatures for the years 2090 to 2099 will rise by 1.1 to 6.4°C over values in 2001 to 2010. The greatest temperature increases will occur over land and at high northern latitudes, with less warming over the southern oceans and the North Atlantic (footnote 16). This rate of warming, driven primarily by fossil fuel consumption, would be much higher than the changes that were observed in the 20th century and probably unprecedented over at least the past 10,000 years. Based on projections like this, along with field studies of current impacts, scientists forecast many significant effects from global climate change in the next several decades, although much uncertainty remains about where these impacts will be felt worldwide and how severe they will be.

Marine biology Only 29 percent of the world surface is land. The rest is ocean, home to the marine lifeforms. The oceans average nearly four kilometres in depth and are fringed with coastlines that run for 360,000 kilometres.[1][2] A large proportion of all life on Earth exists in the ocean. Exactly how large the proportion is unknown, since many ocean species are still to be discovered. The ocean is a complex three-dimensional world[3] covering about 71% of the Earth's surface. Alcubierre Warp Drive Time Travel An Alcubierre Warp Drive stretches spacetime in a wave causing the fabric of space ahead of a spacecraft to contract and the space behind it to expand. The ship can ride the wave to accelerate to high speeds and time travel. The Alcubierre drive, also known as the Alcubierre metric or Warp Drive, is a mathematical model of a spacetime exhibiting features reminiscent of the fictional "warp drive" from Star Trek, which can travel "faster than light" (although not in a local sense - see below). The key characteristics of the application of Alcubierre warp drives for time control and time travel are presented in the picture below.

Global Green USA The 14th Annual Sustainable Design Awards were presented on Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at the Metropolitan Pavilion in New York City. Honorees included the Clinton Foundation, accepted by Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair of Clinton Foundation; Benjamin Zachary Bronfman, Impact Entrepreneur; and Dr. Mark Z. Jacobson, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University; and Action Environmental Group.

Mantis shrimp Called "sea locusts" by ancient Assyrians, "prawn killers" in Australia and now sometimes referred to as "thumb splitters" – because of the animal's ability to inflict painful gashes if handled incautiously[4] – mantis shrimp sport powerful claws that they use to attack and kill prey by spearing, stunning, or dismemberment. Although it only happens rarely, some larger species of mantis shrimp are capable of breaking through aquarium glass with a single strike from this weapon.[5] Ecology[edit] These aggressive and typically solitary sea creatures spend most of their time hiding in rock formations or burrowing intricate passageways in the sea bed. They either wait for prey to chance upon them or, unlike most crustaceans, at times they hunt, chase, and kill prey. They rarely exit their homes except to feed and relocate, and can be diurnal, nocturnal, or crepuscular, depending on the species.

Fish mimics octopus that mimics fish Nature's game of intimidation and imitation comes full circle in the waters of Indonesia, where scientists have recorded for the first time an association between the black-marble jawfish (Stalix cf. histrio) and the mimic octopus (Thaumoctopus mimicus). Undescribed by scientists until 1998, the talented mimic octopus is known to impersonate toxic flatfish, lionfish, and even sea snakes by creatively configuring its limbs, adopting characteristic undulating movements, and displaying bold brown-and-white color patterns. Thanks to these brazen habits, it can swim in the open with relatively little fear of predators. Animal Sleep Most animals have a daily pattern of rest and activity. Some animals are more active during the day (diurnal) and some are more active during the night (nocturnal). How much time do animals spend sleeping? Well, it depends on the animal:

Your Brain On Psilocybin Might Be Less Depressed : Shots - Health Blog hide captionThis could be your forest on psilocybin. Baxterclaus/Flickr This could be your forest on psilocybin. Magic mushrooms are said to blow your mind, but the hallucinogenic chemical psilocybin, the active ingredient, actually reins in key parts of the brain, according to two new studies. The memorably vivid emotional experiences reported by mushroom users may flourish because the parts of the brain suppressed by psilocybin usually keep our world view tidy and rational.

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