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Light and Composition

We may not be amongst the top thinkers of this era, and we are not claiming to know every single thing about art, but we do know how one can achieve the best expression of creativity. We have sage wisdom, which we believe every photographer should know. To us, delving into the world of photography is a wonderful venture to the essence of art, with its own visual language, which portrays beauty in a completely new light. Take a journey with us towards the true essence of photography. Let’s make a better world. 1,443,592 people subscribed

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Art Art is a diverse range of human activities and the products of those activities, usually involving imaginative or technical skill. In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art. This article focuses primarily on the visual arts, which includes the creation of images or objects in fields including painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and other visual media. Architecture is often included as one of the visual arts; however, like the decorative arts, it involves the creation of objects where the practical considerations of use are essential—in a way that they usually are not in a painting, for example. The nature of art, and related concepts such as creativity and interpretation, are explored in a branch of philosophy known as aesthetics.[8] Creative art and fine art

What the Mona Lisa Can Teach You About Taking Great Portraits - Digital Photography School When it comes to famous images the Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci is one of the most recognized in the world. When I visited the Lourve in Paris a couple of years ago I was stunned by the crowds of people gathering around this small image, pushing and shoving to get close and to take a picture of it (I got some great shots of the crowd). The Mona Lisa has been at the center of much debate and speculation over the years but why is it an image that intrigues people so much and what can we learn from it as photographers today? While we live in a different time (the Mona Lisa was painted in the 1500’s) and use different technology – is there something in this famous image that we can be inspired by as image makers today? Lessons from the Mona Lisa for Photographers Today I want to explore some of the different aspect of the Mona Lisa and point out some things that Leonardo did in painting this image that I think we could take away as portrait photographers today.

10 Landscape Composition Tips: Illustrated with Pictures from Eastern Washington A Guest post by Amar Ramesh. Composition for a photograph is like a screenplay for a movie. If the picture isn’t composed well, it won’t strike a cord with the viewer regardless of the technical expertise or the story being told. Composition skills improve over time with constant practice. Your Camera Doesn't Matter Home Donate New Search Gallery Reviews How-To Books Links Workshops About Contact Your Camera Doesn't Matter © 2013 Ken Rockwell Also in Spanish, Ukrainian, French, Italian, German, Chinese, Dutch, Hebrew, Vietnamese, Russian, Portuguese and Hungarian. Mono Lake, Saturday, 25 July 1993, snapped with a broken camera. bigger. tech details. Mono Lake, 11 August 2001, snapped with a floppy-disc camera. Dawn, Mono Lake, 12 August 2001, snapped with a floppy-disc camera.

Victor Horta Victor, Baron Horta (6 January 1861 - 8 September 1947) was a Belgian architect and designer. John Julius Norwich described him as "undoubtedly the key European Art Nouveau architect." Indeed, Horta is one of the most important names in Art Nouveau architecture; the construction of his Hôtel Tassel in Brussels in 1892-3 means that he is sometimes credited as the first to introduce the style to architecture from the decorative arts. The French architect Hector Guimard was deeply influenced by Horta and further spread the "whiplash" style in France and abroad. Life and career[edit] 10 Questions to Ask When Taking a Photo A Post By: Darren Rowse What goes through your mind in the moments as you raise your digital camera up to take a shot and before you press the shutter? If you’re like many digital photographers you’re not thinking about too much – you just want to capture the moment and then move on.

Understanding Exposure – Part 1: Exposure Triangle Photography has so many technical terms and jargon that it can all get so confusing at times. One thing that any photographer should fully understand, though, is exposure. Photography means ‘capturing the light’ and exposure is the total amount of light that reaches the film (traditional photography) or sensor (digital photography). Exposure is defined by three elements which make up the ‘exposure triangle’. These would be ISO, aperture and shutter speed. Art Deco Historian Bevis Hillier defined Art Deco as "an assertively modern style [that] ran to symmetry rather than asymmetry, and to the rectilinear rather than the curvilinear; it responded to the demands of the machine and of new material [and] the requirements of mass production".[2] During its heyday, Art Deco represented luxury, glamour, exuberance and faith in social and technological progress. §Etymology[edit] The first use of the term Art Deco has been attributed to architect Le Corbusier, who penned a series of articles in his journal L'Esprit nouveau under the headline "1925 Expo: Arts Déco".

Learn How to Use the Sharpening Tools in Lightroom - Digital Photography School There’s no question that Lightroom is a powerful piece of photo processing software, but due to that power sometimes it’s not as easy to wrap our heads around everything it has to offer, that’s in part why I started my Let’s Edit YouTube series a weekly segment in which I share my own editing workflow for viewers to learn from. After starting this series one of the most commonly asked questions was to go into more detail on how the sharpening tools in Lightroom work. Sharpening in Lightroom is broken down into four different sliders – Amount, Radius, Detail and Masking – and they each work together to help you achieve the perfect amount of sharpness in your photograph. Today, rather than simply answer this question to the comparatively small group of people over on my site, I thought I’d bring these tips to the dPS community as a whole. I know there are a lot more people out there looking to master the art of sharpening images and I’m happy to help explain them.

Using Diagonal Lines in Photography - Digital Photography School This tip builds on the previous one on Working the Lines in your Photography. By Angie Harms Diagonal lines generally work well to draw the eye of an image’s viewer through the photograph.

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