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The Elements of Change

The Elements of Change
‘Without accepting the fact that everything changes, we cannot find perfect composure. But unfortunately, although it is true, it is difficult for us to accept it. Because we cannot accept the truth of transience, we suffer.’ ~Shunryu Suzuki Post written by Leo Babauta. Change can be a difficult thing. I’m happy to report that after years of studying it, I’ve become fairly good at it (though happily failing all the time). What have I learned from my changes? It can be incredibly difficult, or it can be wonderfully joyous. My Recent Changes I’ve made dozens of changes over the last few years (read My Story for a partial list), but here’s a short list of a few I’ve made just this year: Lost over 40 lbs since last year. Again, this is a short list — there are others that are less noteworthy, and probably a few I’m forgetting. The Elements of Change So what’s the joyous path to making these changes and others? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. And lastly One last note, to anyone making changes: you will fail. Related:  Leo Babauta - Zen Habitsepicmindthinking

13 Things to Avoid When Changing Habits | Zen Habits “Habit is habit, and not to be flung out of the window by any man, but coaxed downstairs a step at a time.” - Mark Twain Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter. I’ve learned a lot about changing habits in the last 2 1/2 years, from quitting smoking to taking up running and GTD and vegetarianism and waking early and all that. I’ve not only learned a lot about what you should do when changing habits, but through my failures, I’ve learned about what not to do. And trust me, I’ve had lots of failures. I’ve found failures to be just as important as successes when trying to learn how to improve, especially when it comes to changing habits. I’ve done that, with one failure after another, and would like to share a few things I’ve learned to avoid when trying to change a habit. “Motivation is what gets you started. Taking on two or more habits at once. “We are what we repeatedly do. —If you liked this article, please share it on del.icio.us, StumbleUpon or Digg.

20 mental barriers you should let go of photo by admitchell08 You are in an imaginary hot air balloon. It’s just you and all of your belongings in the wicker basket. Something went wrong and you are losing altitude fast. You will hit the ground in less than ten minutes if you don’t come up with something quick. The only immediate solution is to get rid of excess weight and throw off at least half of your belongings. This happens to all of us in less dramatic circumstances. Our mental life follows the same fate. Some of them are useless ideas that drag us down considerably. So if you were in the hot air balloon situation, which of these mental barriers should we let go? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Related posts:

9 Epiphanies That Shifted My Perspective Forever By David Over the years I’ve learned dozens of little tricks and insights for making life more fulfilling. They’ve added up to a significant improvement in the ease and quality of my day-to-day life. But the major breakthroughs have come from a handful of insights that completely rocked my world and redefined reality forever. The world now seems to be a completely different one than the one I lived in about ten years ago, when I started looking into the mechanics of quality of life. Maybe you’ve had some of the same insights. 1. The first time I heard somebody say that, I didn’t like the sound of it one bit. I see quite clearly now that life is nothing but passing experiences, and my thoughts are just one more category of things I experience. If you can observe your thoughts just like you can observe other objects, who’sdoing the observing? 2. Of course! 3. 4. 5. Yikes. 6. This discovery was a complete 180 from my old understanding of emotions. 7. 8. 9.

Nondualism Nondualism, also called non-duality, "points to the idea that the universe and all its multiplicity are ultimately expressions or appearances of one essential reality." It is a term and concept used to define various strands of religious and spiritual thought. It is found in a variety of Asian religious traditions and modern western spirituality, but with a variety of meanings and uses. The term may refer to: Its origins are situated within the Buddhist tradition with its teaching of sunyata, the absence of inherently existing natures; the two truths doctrine, the nonduality of the absolute and the relative; and the Yogacara notion of "pure consciousness" or "representation-only" (vijñapti-mātra). The term has more commonly become associated with the Advaita Vedanta tradition of Adi Shankara, which took over the Buddhist notions of anutpada and pure consciousness and provided an orthodox hermeneutical basis for heterodox Buddhist phenomology. Definitions[edit] Indian Buddhism[edit] D. 1.

Mark Twain's Advice for a Kick-Ass Life “It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.” “Let us live so that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.” “When your friends begin to flatter you on how young you look, it’s a sure sign you’re getting old.” You may know Mark Twain for some of his very popular books like Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Twain is known for his many – and often funny – quotes. 1. “A man cannot be comfortable without his own approval.” If you don’t approve of yourself, of your behaviour and actions then you’ll probably walk around most of the day with a sort of uncomfortable feeling. This can, in a related way, be a big obstacle in personal growth. What you may be bumping into there are success barriers. Or if you make some headway in the direction you want to go you may start to sabotage for yourself. So you need give yourself approval and allow yourself to be who you want to be. 2. “Age is an issue of mind over matter. 3. 4.

The Habit Change Cheatsheet: 29 Ways to Successfully Ingrain a Behavior : zenhabits We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. – Aristotle Our daily lives are often a series of habits played out through the day, a trammeled existence fettered by the slow accretion of our previous actions. By Leo Babauta But habits can be changed, as difficult as that may seem sometimes. I’m a living example: in tiny, almost infinitesimal steps, I’ve changed a laundry list of habits. It’s possible. And while I’ve written about habit change many times over the course of the life of Zen Habits, today I thought I’d put the best tips all together in one cheatsheet, for those new to the blog and for those who could use the reminders. Keep it simple Habit change is not that complicated. The simple steps of habit change: 1. 2. 3. That’s it. The Habit Change Cheatsheet The following is a compilation of tips to help you change a habit. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

Words of Wisdom For Woodworkers Do not argue with an idiot; he will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience. Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car. The last thing I want to do is hurt you; But it’s still on the list. Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak. If I agreed with you we’d both be wrong. We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public. War does not determine who is right – only who is left. Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad. The early bird might get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese. Evening news is where they begin with ‘Good evening’, and then proceed to tell you why it isn’t. To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism. A bus station is where a bus stops. How is it one careless match can start a forest fire, but it takes a whole box to start a campfire? I didn’t say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

This Moment By Leo Babauta We all suffer, every day: worry, procrastination, anxiety, feeling overwhelmed, irritated, angry, frustrated, wishing things were different, comparing ourselves to others, worried we’re missing out, wishing other people would be different, feeling offended, loneliness, fear of failure, not wanting to do something, wishing we had less fat or bigger boobs or bigger muscles, angry at being controlled, wanting to find the perfect someone, wishing our partner was more perfect, stressed about finances, not wanting to think about problems, not knowing how to fix things, uncertain about choices, rushing from one task to the next, not liking our jobs. And yet, these problems are self-created. They’re real, but our tricky minds have created them. The problems are in our heads, created by some ideal/fantasy/expectation of how we wished the world would be, or hope it will be but fear it won’t be. It exists in our heads. It is perfect, as it is. Accept this moment.

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning. However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. Tell: Tell children the story by reading the text or having them read the text. Suggest: This involves providing children with choices about what might happen next or possible opinions they might have. For the story, here are some two-question rule sequences:

Ten Lies You'll Hear Before Pursuing Your Dream (photo: salty_soul) Unfortunately, just before you take your first step on the righteous journey to pursue your dreams, people around you, even the ones who deeply care for you, will give you awful advice. It’s not because they have evil intentions. It’s because they don’t understand the big picture—what your dreams, passions, and life goals mean to you. They don’t understand that, to you, the reward is worth the risk. So they try to protect you by shielding you from the possibility of failure, which, in effect, also shields you from the possibility of making your dreams a reality. As our friend Steve Jobs says: “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Here are ten ill-advised tips (lies) people will likely tell you when you decide to pursue your dreams and the reasons why they are dreadfully mistaken: 1. Someday? 2. Wrong! 3. Sure, I suppose. 4. It’s only impossible if you never do anything about it. 5. 6. Failures are simply stepping stones to success. 7. 8.

How to Change Your Life: A User's Guide ‘You will never change your life until you change something you do daily.’ ~Mike Murdock By Leo Babauta Start with a simple statement: what do you want to be? Are you hoping to someday be a writer, a musician, a designer, a programmer, a polyglot, a carpenter, a manga artist, an entrepreneur, an expert at something? How do you get there? Do you set yourself a big goal to complete by the end of the year, or in three months? I’m going to lay down the law here, based on many many experiments I’ve done in the last 7 years: nothing will change unless you make a daily change. I’ve tried weekly action steps, things that I do every other day, big bold monthly goals, lots of other permutations. If you’re not willing to make it a daily change, you don’t really want to change your life in this way. So make a daily change. How to Turn an Aspiration Into a Daily Change Let’s name a few aspirations: How do you turn those lofty ideas into daily changes? You get the idea. How to Implement Daily Changes

9 things successful people do differently Why have you been so successful in reaching some of your goals, but not others? If you aren’t sure, you are far from alone in your confusion. It turns out that even brilliant, highly accomplished people are pretty lousy when it comes to understanding why they succeed or fail. The intuitive answer — that you are born predisposed to certain talents and lacking in others — is really just one small piece of the puzzle. In fact, decades of research on achievement suggests that successful people reach their goals not simply because of who they are, but more often because of what they do . When you set yourself a goal, try to be as specific as possible. {*style:<b> 2. To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take , in advance. Achieving any goal also requires honest and regular monitoring of your progress — if not by others, then by you yourself. 4. 5. 6. The good news is, if you aren’t particularly gritty now, there is something you can do about it.

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