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Skills Overview

Skills Overview
The Big6™ Developed by Mike Eisenberg and Bob Berkowitz, the Big6 is the most widely known and widely used approach to teaching information and technology skills in the world. Used in thousands of K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and corporate and adult training programs, the Big6 information problem-solving model is applicable whenever people need and use information. The Big6 integrates information search and use skills along with technology tools in a systematic process to find, use, apply, and evaluate information for specific needs and tasks. Why Big6™? We all suffer from information overload. One solution to the information problem—the one that seems to be most often adopted in schools (as well as in business and society in general)—is to speed things up. The Big6™ Skills The Big6 is a process model of how people of all ages solve an information problem. 1. 1.1 Define the information problem 1.2 Identify information needed 2. 2.1 Determine all possible sources 3. 4. 5. 6.

http://big6.com/pages/about/big6-skills-overview.php

Related:  Information and digital literacyInformation and Digital Literacyinformation literacyTechnologydefencechd

Info Literacy in the Facebook News Era A growing number of Americans are getting their news from social media sites like Facebook and Twitter according to a recent poll from Pew Research. At the same time, NPR and others are reporting this month that a proliferation of fake news sites have to come into being that use the viral nature of social media to drive ad revenue. The Pew poll showed that two-thirds of Americans said they used social media sites to get news. 18% said they “often” got their news from social media. Facebook and Twitter already have the potential to limit their users’ exposure to other viewpoints through the “echo chamber” effect; the introduction of purposely false news stories onto social media’s vast platform has led many to wonder if this has the power to swing elections, influence public opinion, and affect policy.

TeenTech TeenTech runs lively events with a supporting awards scheme to help young teenagers see the wide range of career possibilities in Science, Engineering and Technology. An award-winning, industry-led initiative, TeenTech was founded in 2008 by Maggie Philbin and Chris Dodson to help the “X Factor” generation understand their true potential and the real opportunities available in the contemporary STEM workplace. Partnership with the CILIP IL Group The CILIP Information Literacy Group, in partnership with the TeenTech initiative, sponsors an award for 11-16 year olds that recognises excellence in research and information literacy. The Research and Information Literacy Award celebrates how well young people can dispel the ‘Google Generation’ myth and show that they can be truly information literate researchers as they explore their ideas to make life better, simpler or easier.

Opinion: Dear Congressman, Research Shows Closing School Libraries and Cutting Certified Librarians Does Not Make Sense Last April, after I’d criticized my congressman—Jim Himes of District 4 in Connecticut—in a column, he asked if we could meet for a “deep dive” on education issues so he could understand why they have become so polarizing. His response was to ask me if there is research to justify the salary of a media specialist. My answer was a resounding “Yes!” There is ample research, and I gathered much of it myself from existing studies while also conducting my own informal online research questionnaire for school librarians and librarians. It tells us children in poverty grow up with fewer books in the home and less access to bookstores and public libraries than their higher Supplemental Education Services counterparts (Neuman and Celano, 2001).

Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education were rescinded by the ACRL Board of Directors on June 25, 2016, at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. These standards were reviewed by the ACRL Standards Committee and approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) on January 18, 2000, at the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association in San Antonio, Texas. These standards were also endorsed by the American Association for Higher Education (October 1999) and the Council of Independent Colleges (February 2004).

Fake news isn’t the only problem After two weeks of following the story of Macedonian “fake news” sites and Facebook’s editorial responsibilities, we wanted to discuss the fact that fake news is only part of the problem. Discerning real information from biased misinformation is a growing challenge in the 21st century. Politicians aren’t the media, but they do get the word out:

5 Great Videos for Library Instruction The teaching librarians here are gearing up for another semester of classes which begin next week. In some of the classes we do, we like to use different sorts of media and technology for teaching. We’ve been looking at videos for several of our classes and I’m always surprised with the interesting videos that other the librarians find. Here are five of my favorite videos for information literacy instruction that I’ve seen over the years. LibGuides: Pedagogy to Oppress? You have to be a pretty tenacious researcher to find any criticism about LibGuides, the practical and convenient tool that librarians use to create online guides to research. My search for “LibGuides and critique or criticism” taught me a great deal about how to interpret literature, while keying in “LibGuides and problems” merely returned information about the occasional scheduled downtime. It was not until I limited my search to wordpress.com and then traced a bunch of links and pingbacks that I could even start to gather a sense of the conversation round the topic.

Keeping Up with New Tools There are hundreds and hundreds of web-based tools available! There seem to be a dozen or more new tools online every day! Here are some of the newest ones that I'm exploring (from my Pinterest boards):Donna BaumbachWebTools-New 2 Me! InfoLit Modules "Information literacy is an essential component of any educational program at the graduate or undergraduate levels." 1 The InfoLit Modules provide high quality, ACRL-aligned instructional materials to help librarians deepen the quality of student instruction on research strategies and techniques. With 60 high-quality videos, tutorials, and quizzes, the InfoLit Modules are ideal for supplementing existing lessons, for “one shot” library instructional sessions, and for addressing gaps in classroom or online teaching. Why InfoLit Modules? Ready-made materials free up classroom time for subject-specific instructionConsistent baseline materials easily scale across multiple courses or campuswideCustomize modules to specific courses without sacrificing consistencyProvides knowledge checks for checking students’ understandingEmbed resources right into your LMSStronger information literacy and critical thinking skills lead to higher retentionOffers ADA compliant resources Find out more

What does a school library look like in the digital age? The concept of a school library in a digital age is challenging. With the capacity to download books onto a range of digital devices there is every possibility the library could look superfluous to youngsters growing up today. Why would you want to visit a room which is essentially about storage and distribution? We are in the middle of redesigning our school library. So, this question has exercised the mind of my school because senior school students are already equipped with iPads. We had to consider what for many teachers is the unthinkable – is the library an anachronism?

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