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Facebook's Zuckerberg Says The Age of Privacy is Over

Facebook's Zuckerberg Says The Age of Privacy is Over
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg told a live audience yesterday that if he were to create Facebook again today, user information would by default be public, not private as it was for years until the company changed dramatically in December. In a six-minute interview on stage with TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington, Zuckerberg spent 60 seconds talking about Facebook's privacy policies. His statements were of major importance for the world's largest social network - and his arguments in favor of an about-face on privacy deserve close scrutiny. Zuckerberg offered roughly 8 sentences in response to Arrington's question about where privacy was going on Facebook and around the web. The question was referencing the changes Facebook underwent last month. Your name, profile picture, gender, current city, networks, Friends List, and all the pages you subscribe to are now publicly available information on Facebook. See also: Why Facebook is Wrong: Privacy is Still Important Zuckerberg:

http://readwrite.com/2010/01/09/facebooks_zuckerberg_says_the_age_of_privacy_is_ov

Related:  Privacy

TSA Groping Out Of Control Everything you need to know about the security takeover and why airport oppression is already being rolled out on the streets Paul Joseph Watson & Alex JonesPrison Planet.com Monday, November 8, 2010 TSA abuse in airports is completely out of control with more and more cases of security workers groping women, fondling children, abusing naked body scanners, and interrogating passengers emerging every week, and yet the government’s answer to the epidemic of oppression is to hand TSA thugs more power with which to harass American citizens. The story of Infowars employee Michelle, who along with her child was sexually assaulted by TSA staff after refusing to go through a naked body scanner, has gone viral on the Internet after it was picked up by the Drudge Report, a website leading the charge in the backlash against airport oppression at the hands of the TSA that has now led to the world’s largest pilot’s association boycotting the use of naked body scanners. A d v e r t i s e m e n t BUSTED!

WhyFacebook is Wrong Privacy Still imp Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg told a live audience this weekend that the world has changed, that it's become more public and less private, and that the controversial new default and permanent settings reflect how the site would work if he were to create it today. Not everyone agrees with his move and its justification. Has society become less private or is it Facebook that's pushing people in that direction? Is privacy online just an illusion anyway? Below are some thoughts, based primarily on the pro-privacy reactions to Zuckerberg's statements from many of our readers this weekend.

The Day Has Come: Facebook Pushes People to Go Public Facebook announced this morning that its 350 million users will be prompted to make their status messages and shared content publicly visible to the world at large and search engines. It's a move we expected but the language used in the announcement is near Orwellian. The company says the move is all about helping users protect their privacy and connect with other people, but the new default option is to change from "old settings" to becoming visible to "everyone." This is not what Facebook users signed up for. It's not about privacy at all, it's about increasing traffic and the visibility of activity on the site.

Facebook privacy: a guide - Ars Technica Everywhere you look (even here at Ars), there are articles about people making poor decisions about what kinds of info and how much to share on sites like Facebook. The Internet is no longer a place where you can hide out easily—friends, family, and employers are all lurking, reading your embarrassing status updates and checking up on those drunken pictures from last week. And that's just the beginning—the world of social networking is a feeding ground for identity thieves and stalkers, too. But it doesn't have to be that way.

ACLU of Northern California : Don't Hide Your Gun in Your iPhone(?!) In a case with chilling privacy implications, the California Supreme Court recently held that police officers can search the entire contents of a cell phone whenever they arrest someone, no matter how small the suspected crime or how relevant the cell phone contents might be. Why? Because it's just like a backpack, according to the Court, and previous cases have stated that backpacks can be searched "incident to arrest" without a warrant. The problem, of course, is that cell phones and backpacks are very different. Zuckerberg Opens His Facebook Page Wide Open. He Knows What He’s From the beginning of the week, Facebook began rolling out new privacy settings, which were meant to enable the user what information can be shown (to people who are not friends, or are friends of friends, or networks). They were also able to keep their old privacy settings. In a press release, Elliot Schrage, Vice President of Communications, Public Policy and Marketing said “Facebook is transforming the world’s ability to control its information online by empowering more than 350 million people to personalize the audience for each piece of content they share.”

Why Facebook Changed Its Privacy Strategy We reported yesterday that Facebook is aiming to get people to be more public on the site and that anyone who hasn't changed their privacy settings will now see it "recommended" that their status updates, photos etc. be exposed to the whole web. I had a unique opportunity to speak to Barry Schnitt, Director of Corporate Communications and Public Policy at Facebook and quite a frank guy, at length this afternoon about Facebook's privacy policy changes. Schnitt said "your understanding is basically correct," but disagreed with the negative light I saw the change in. Becoming less private and more public is "a change just like it was a change in 2006 when Facebook became more than just people from colleges," Schnitt told us. "Facebook is changing," he said, "and so is the world changing and we are going to innovate to meet user requests."

Criticism of Facebook Facebook has received criticism on a wide range of issues, including its treatment of its users, online privacy, child safety, hate speech, and the inability to terminate accounts without first manually deleting the content. In 2008, many companies removed their advertising from the site because it was being displayed on the pages of individuals and groups they found controversial. The content of some user pages, groups, blogs, and forums has been criticized for promoting or dwelling upon controversial and often divisive topics (e.g., politics, religion, sex, etc.). 32 Ways to Use Facebook for Business Facebook’s not just for keeping tabs on friends and filling out quizzes — it can also be used as a highly effective business tool. It’s great for marketing your products, landing gigs and connecting with your customers. Here are 32 ways to use Facebook in your business.

petewarden/iPhoneTracker @ GitHub This open-source application maps the information that your iPhone is recording about your movements. It doesn't record anything itself, it only displays files that are already hidden on your computer. Download the application Read the FAQ Facebook Founder on Privacy: Public Is the New "Social Norm" Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg claims that if Facebook was starting out now, sharing with everybody — rather than with a small group of friends — would be the starting point. Is this more about reflecting social norms or changing them to help Facebook compete with Twitter? The statement, made during a livestream of the Crunchies awards, hits on a hot button issue for Facebook: It recently notified users of privacy changes via a pop-up notification. While the message claimed that Facebook was displaying the message to give users more privacy controls, blindly clicking "next" was a way to make much of your data public. And in fact, some data like the Friends List has become more public without any settings changes by users. Zuckerberg: Sharing is the "Social Norm"

How Facebook's New Privacy Changes Will Affect You In a late night post on Facebook's company blog, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a round of upcoming changes that will affect all users of the social network. Specifically, the changes focus on new privacy controls for information sharing. For those who have been following Facebook closely, the announcement doesn't deliver any new information, it only confirms some previously discussed plans.

Related:  networking