background preloader

Communication

Communication
In the realm of biology in general, communication often occurs through visual, auditory, or biochemical means. Human communication is unique for its extensive use of language. Non-human communication is studied in the field of biosemiotics. Nonverbal communication[edit] Verbal communication[edit] Effective verbal or spoken communication is dependent on a number of factors and cannot be fully isolated from other important interpersonal skills such as non-verbal communication, listening skills and clarification. Written communication and its historical development[edit] Over time the forms of and ideas about communication have evolved through the continuing progression of technology. The progression of written communication can be divided into three "information communication revolutions":[3] Communication is thus a process by which meaning is assigned and conveyed in an attempt to create shared understanding. Business communication[edit] Effective communication[edit] Physical barriers. Related:  Dear Fire, (Fear & Desire)Intelligence

Written communication and it's historical development How to Be Outgoing: 7 Steps Edit Article Help with Being OutgoingMastering the Art of ConversationThinking Positively, Effectively, and ConfidentlyMaking It EasierBeing a Social Butterfly Edited by Troy, Dan McGillen, BrettCapewell, Falcon Strike and 98 others Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to be confident in order to be outgoing. Ad Steps Part 1 of 4: Mastering the Art of Conversation 1Foster your curiosity about people. 9Note your body language. Part 2 of 4: Thinking Positively, Effectively, and Confidently 1Want it...for the right reasons. 7Think of past successes. Part 3 of 4: Making It Easier 1Set goals. 7Take risks. Part 4 of 4: Being a Social Butterfly

3. Self-awareness Self-awareness is the capacity for introspection and the ability to recognize oneself as an individual separate from the environment and other individuals.[1] It is not to be confused with consciousness. While consciousness is being aware of one’s environment and body and lifestyle, self-awareness is the recognition of that consciousness.[2] Neurobiological basis[edit] There are questions regarding what part of the brain allows us to be self-aware and how we are biologically programmed to be self- aware. Animals[edit] Studies have been done mainly on primates to test if self-awareness is present. The ‘Red Spot Technique’ created and experimented by Gordon Gallup[6] studies self-awareness in animals (primates). Researchers used the Mark test or Mirror test [12] to study the magpie’s self awareness. A few slight occurrences of behavior towards the magpie's own body happened in the trial with the black mark and the mirror. Psychology[edit] Developmental stages[edit] Level 0: Confusion. [edit]

Family (biology) What does and does not belong to each family is determined by a taxonomist — as is whether a particular family should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists taking different positions. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing a family. Some taxa are accepted almost universally, while others are recognised only rarely. The naming of families is codified by various international codes. In fungal, algal, and botanical nomenclature, the family names of plants, fungi, and algae end with the suffix "-aceae", with the exception of a small number of historic but widely used names including Compositae and Gramineae.[1][2]In zoological nomenclature, the family names of animals end with the suffix "-idae".[3] Carolus Linnaeus used the word familia in his Philosophia botanica (1751) to denote major groups of plants: trees, herbs, ferns, palms, and so on. Compare:

Effective communication Social skills Social skill is any skill facilitating interaction and communication with others. Social rules and relations are created, communicated, and changed in verbal and nonverbal ways. The process of learning such skills is called socialization. Eileen Kennedy-Moore posits that there are three processes underlying social skills: seeing, thinking, and doing.[1] Seeing involves being aware of social cues and the situational context, as well as monitoring other people's behavior and reactions. Interpersonal skills are sometimes also referred to as people skills or communication skills.[3] Interpersonal skills are the skills a person uses to communicate and interact with others. The term "interpersonal skills" is used often in business contexts to refer to the measure of a person's ability to operate within business organizations through social communication and interactions. Social psychology is an academic discipline that does research related to social skills or interpersonal skills. ADHD[edit]

2. Understanding Understanding (also called intellection) is a psychological process related to an abstract or physical object, such as a person, situation, or message whereby one is able to think about it and use concepts to deal adequately with that object. Understanding is a relation between the knower and an object of understanding. Understanding implies abilities and dispositions with respect to an object of knowledge sufficient to support intelligent behavior.[1] An understanding is the limit of a conceptualization. Examples[edit] Understanding as a model[edit] Gregory Chaitin, a noted computer scientist, propounds a view that comprehension is a kind of data compression.[2] In his essay "The Limits of Reason", he argues that understanding something means being able to figure out a simple set of rules that explains it. Components of understanding[edit] Cognition and affect[edit] Cognition is the process by which sensory inputs are transformed. Religious perspectives[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Grief A family mourns during a funeral at the Lion's cemetery during the Siege of Sarajevo in 1992. Grief is a multifaceted response to loss, particularly to the loss of someone or something to which a bond was formed. Although conventionally focused on the emotional response to loss, it also has physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, spiritual, and philosophical dimensions. While the terms are often used interchangeably, bereavement refers to the state of loss, and grief is the reaction to loss. Grief is a natural response to loss. Grieving process[edit] Every step of the process is natural and healthy. Shock and Denial Shock is the initial reaction to loss. Intense Concern Intense concern often manifests by being unable to think of anything else. Despair and Depression Recovery The goal of grieving is not the elimination of all the pain or the memories of the loss. [edit] Crying is a normal and natural part of grieving. Five identities of grievers[edit] Bereavement science[edit] Risks[edit]

Information exchange Information exchange is an informal term that can either refer to bidirectional information transmission/information transfer in telecommunications and computer science or communication seen from a system-theoretic or information-theoretic point of view. Information exchange is also used to describe the process of learning and the efficiency of the learning. See also[edit] References[edit] How to Become More Outgoing and Daring in Life: 8 Steps Edit Article Edited by Kiwimeister, Flickety, Teresa, Steven Horton and 2 others Are you feeling lonely or depressed? Maybe you just want some more friends or want to become more outgoing? Maybe you feel as though you aren't awesome enough? If so, the key to achieving your goal is to become more awesome than you already are. Ad Steps 1Make a list. 8Accept failure. Warnings Although the internet can be a great place to build confidence because of its lack of face-to-face encounters, that fact can also make it a great place for creepers.

1. Abstract thought Abstraction is a process by which concepts are derived from the usage and classification of literal ("real" or "concrete") concepts, first principles, or other methods. "An abstraction" is the product of this process—a concept that acts as a super-categorical noun for all subordinate concepts, and connects any related concepts as a group, field, or category.[1] Abstractions may be formed by reducing the information content of a concept or an observable phenomenon, typically to retain only information which is relevant for a particular purpose. For example, abstracting a leather soccer ball to the more general idea of a ball retains only the information on general ball attributes and behavior, eliminating the other characteristics of that particular ball.[1] Origins[edit] Thinking in abstractions is considered[by whom?] Abstraction involves induction of ideas or the synthesis of particular facts into one general theory about something. Thought process[edit] Cat on Mat (picture 1)

Hive Plots - Linear Layout for Network Visualization - Visually Interpreting Network Structure and Content Made Possible Paralanguage Paralinguistic information, because it is phenomenal, belongs to the external speech signal (Ferdinand de Saussure's parole) but not to the arbitrary conventional code of language (Saussure's langue). The paralinguistic properties of speech play an important role in human communication. There are no utterances or speech signals that lack paralinguistic properties, since speech requires the presence of a voice that can be modulated. This voice must have some properties, and all the properties of a voice as such are paralinguistic. However, the distinction linguistic vs. paralinguistic applies not only to speech but to writing and sign language as well, and it is not bound to any sensory modality. Even vocal language has some paralinguistic as well as linguistic properties that can be seen (lip reading, McGurk effect), and even felt, e.g. by the Tadoma method. Aspects of the speech signal[edit] Perspectival aspects Organic aspects Expressive aspects Linguistic aspects Gasps[edit] Sighs[edit]

The Art of Conversation: Timeless, Timely Do's and Don'ts from 1866 By Maria Popova Manners today are often seen as a quaint subject that belongs in Lord Chesterfield’s outlandish advice on the art of pleasing or Esquire‘s dated guide to dating. But in a culture where we regularly do online what we’d never do in person and behave offline in ways our grandparents wouldn’t have dared dream of even in their most defiant fantasies, there’s something to be said for the lost art of, if not “manners,” politeness and simple respect in communication. Though originally published in 1866, Martine’s Hand-book of Etiquette, and Guide to True Politeness (public library; public domain; free Kindle download) by Arthur Martine contains a treasure trove of timeless — and increasingly timely — pointers on the necessary art of living up to our social-animal destiny. Martine contextualizes his mission: Politeness has been defined as an “artificial good-nature;” but it would be better said that good-nature is natural politeness. But he offers an important disclaimer:

A project may have a number of stakeholders, each with differing interest in and influence over the project. The approach to stakeholder management and communication will need to change accordingly. by raviii Jun 11

The main tool a project manager has to accomplish this is effective communication. Maintaining clear communications is particularly important for external stakeholders that are outside the control of the project team. by raviii Jun 11

Related: