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Climate Change Impacts & Threats

Climate Change Impacts & Threats
Climate change is already beginning to transform life on Earth. Around the globe, seasons are shifting, temperatures are climbing and sea levels are rising. And meanwhile, our planet must still supply us – and all living things – with air, water, food and safe places to live. If we don't act now, climate change will rapidly alter the lands and waters we all depend upon for survival, leaving our children and grandchildren with a very different world. Some of the most dangerous consequences of climate change are listed here. Which one will have the most impact on your life, or on the places you care about? Planet Change How is your planet changing?

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Polar Bears and Climate Change Floods. Droughts. Heat waves. Massive storms. Climate change is not just about polar bears, the iconic symbol of a melting Arctic. It affects the entire planet. A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change Get your passport ready! It's time to go on a trip around to world to explore the effects of climate change. Each flag on the map below represents a stop on your journey, and you can visit them in any order you like. You'll see a short video at each stop... and you'll also need to complete a few challenges along the way!

Higher Temperatures Heat-trapping gases emitted by power plants, automobiles, deforestation and other sources are warming up the planet. In fact, the five hottest years on record have all occurred since 1997 and the 10 hottest since 1990, including the warmest years on record – 2005 and 2010. High temperatures are to blame for an increase in heat-related deaths and illness, rising seas, increased storm intensity, and many of the other dangerous consequences of climate change. During the 20th century, the Earth’s average temperature rose one degree Fahrenheit to its highest level in the past four centuries – believed to be the fastest rise in a thousand years. Scientists project that if emissions of heat-trapping carbon emissions aren’t reduced, average surface temperatures could increase by 3 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century. The planet’s oceans are also warming, which is causing dangerous consequences such as stronger storms, coral bleaching and rising seas.

Here's Who To Blame For America's Increased Contribution To Global Warming In 2013 by Emily Atkin Posted on Share this: "Here’s Who To Blame For America’s Increased Contribution To Global Warming In 2013" Share: Global Warming Impacts To fully appreciate the urgency of climate change, it's important to understand the ways it affects society and the natural environment. Sea levels are rising and glaciers are shrinking; record high temperatures and severe rainstorms and droughts are becoming increasingly common. Changes in temperatures and rainfall patterns alter plant and animal behavior and have significant implications for humans.

The clearest proof we’ll ever get that our planet is falling apart Every once in a while, a chart or statistic or image comes along that reminds us, all over again, why it is that this global warming thing is so terrifying. This week, it was those darn walruses, who — after a summer when Arctic sea ice was at its sixth-lowest level on record — mobbed an Alaska beach in the largest such haul-out ever observed there. Salon was on the story. Island Institute (Ocean Acidification) A Climate of Change Workshop | Ocean Acidification Island and coastal communities are on the front line of environmental changes associated with climate change and ocean acidification. Across New England, fishermen and scientists are observing notable shifts in the ecosystem and dramatic changes in the number of fish in the water. Years of harvesting pressure paired with the effects of warming waters and an ever-changing ocean ecosystem have led to the crisis we currently face in the groundfish fishery. Other fisheries such as lobster and shrimp are also grappling with shifting environmental conditions. Scientists, managers, and fishermen have all begun to discuss how we can and should be planning for the unpredictable, impacts these shifts will have on the marine environment and the communities that depend on the ocean resources.

changing landscapes Rising temperatures and changing patterns of rain and snow are forcing trees and plants around the world to move toward polar regions and up mountain slopes. These vegetation shifts will undermine much of the work the conservation community has accomplished to date, with the potential to permanently change the face of Conservancy preserves, local land trusts, and even our national parks. In the tundra, thawing permafrost will allow shrubs and trees to take root. In the Great Plains of the United States, grasslands will likely become forests. And New England’s fiery fall foliage will eventually fade as maple and beech forests shift north toward cooler temperatures.

Climate change: the effects on ocean animals The “poster child” for global warming is the polar bear. But many other animals are already feeling the effects of global climate change on the oceans. Find out about the changing climate's impact on the earth’s population of sea turtles, right whales, penguins, seals, lobsters, and cod. The Arctic’s top predator, the polar bear, is affected both by the reduction in sea ice and by reduced stocks of its primary food, the ringed seal. Polar bears use sea ice as a platform for hunting their prey and for resting. Climate Change and Global Warming Author and Page information by Anup ShahThis Page Last Updated Monday, February 02, 2015 Global warming and climate change is looked at in this section of the global issues web site. Introduced are some of the effects of climate change.

Slavery at its worst in Africa; U.S. is no saint either JOHANNESBURG — Slavery persists in the world. It is even still found in the United States, a new report said Thursday. But nowhere is it worse than in Africa. Sea Turtles Global Warming - Sea Turtle Facts and Information Sea Turtles and Global Warming Even though sea turtles tend to live in warmer waters, the climate changes do affect their natural habitat. This is the result of global warming and every human out there is responsible for it. There are many elements that have to be explored to fully understand how climate change affects them. Sea turtles are very timid creatures, and they don’t do well with stress. Not being able to find enough to eat will be stressful for them.