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Welcome to the BnF The Bibliothèque nationale de France collects, preserves and makes known the national documentary heritage. The BnF’s collections are unique in the world: 14 million books and printed documents, manuscripts, prints, photographs, maps and plans, scores, coins, medals, sound documents, video and multimedia documents, scenery elements... All disciplines, whether intellectual, artistic or scientific, are represented in a comprehensive way. About 150 000 documents are added to the collections each year thanks to legal deposit, acquisitions and donations. Today, the BnF’s digital library, Gallica, provides access to over three millions documents. Numerous cultural events highlight and make known the library’s outstanding collections: exhibitions, lectures, symposiums, concerts and meetings are planned all the year long.

Wellington City Library Welcome! Welcome to our History Popular Topic -- your guide to the depth and breadth of what's on offer on this subject at your library. We've written this page both as a guide to finding history material at the library and online (especially check out the New Zealand and world history websites we've highlighted below!)

Library Media Resources Here's a slideshow that reviews an information problem-solving model that young children kids can understand and use. Just click the RIGHT ARROW BUTTON to advance through this slideshow and see this lesson. Here are some great links to online resources that cover a variety of important aspects of effective library media programs and information & technology literacy. 100 Picture Books Everyone Should Know. From the New York Public Library - great list of great books! 4Teachers. New Zealand protests Image: Hikoi arrives at Parliament on 22nd March 2011 by Lance Andrewes on Flickr We have selected these online resources to support you when you need information relating to New Zealand protests. These range from Parihaka, Māori land march,and seabed and foreshore protests to anti Vietnam, Springbok tour 1981, anti-nuclear and Rainbow Warrior protests. SCIS 1697983 See also: New Zealand History Digital NZ

ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL QR CODE BOOK TRAILERS: SCAN, WATCH, READ SET #1 QR Book Code Trailers Scan, Watch, Read. That’s what your students will do with these QR codes. epic / Homepage - Te Kete Ipurangi (TKI) Kia ora and welcome to EPIC. EPIC is a venture between New Zealand libraries and the Ministry of Education, giving schools free access to a worldwide range of electronic resources. Through EPIC schools can access databases containing thousands of international and New Zealand magazines, newspapers, biographies, substantial reference works, and images. EPIC lets you access up-to-date full text articles covering a huge range of subjects.

Where the Magic Happens: library maker programs Students at Monticello High School in Charlottesville, VA, built a“Frankenwii” from three broken Wiis soldered together to be functional.Photo courtesy of Monticello High School Library Last fall, high school librarian IdaMae Craddock got an unusual call from someone at Randolph College in Lynchburg, VA. The college was piecing together a human skeleton that had been found in the dorms during summer cleaning. Reportedly missing from the science department since the 1970s, the skeleton was being used as a mascot by a secret society on campus. The Public Library as an Incubator for the Arts Arguably, those who believe a public library is simply a repository of print books haven’t been to a public library lately. Here at MindShift, we’ve been covering the ways in which the library is evolving to change the demands of digital technologies and of its patrons: libraries are becoming learning labs, innovation centers, and makerspaces. Of course, the public library has always been a community center as much as a place to go to check out books to read, so the new extensions of the library’s service may not be so far afield from the institution’s mission to provide access to information. Even so, much of the emphasis has been on literacy — reading and writing, digital and analog — and not on other forms of creativity. But three graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Library and Information Studies have launched a project that points to another important way in which libraries play a key role in their communities.

Down the library path Bernadette Bennett, Kerry Gittens, and Lynette Barker When you are working with like-minded people sometimes the planets align and between you clarity can be achieved. The Hunter region has always had a strong professional body of Teacher Librarians (TL), gathering in small groups by region, education sector, and at the annual MANTLE conference. In 2006, the Hunter's TLs at the local Diocesan schools formed a group to create a Diocesan Information Skills strategy and accompanying programming guide that would provide consistency across the Diocese. The NSW Department of Education and Training's Information Skills Process (ISP) was used as the basis for creating the guide.

How Australia's children's authors create magic on a page For a prime example of Australia’s innovation economy in action, look no further than the humble picture book. Staple of bedtime reading, offering textual delights beyond the verbal, picture books are a hidden treasure. Australian picture books sell around the world, and are translated into many languages — take for instance, Jackie French’s iconic Diary of a Wombat (2002), which appears in French, German, Korean, and many more. But though the words need translating, the images, (in French’s book by Bruce Whatley), communicate across language barriers.

What the news media can learn from librarians Photo by Rich Grundy We can all agree it’s been a rough season for the news media. Hostile political crowds, accusations of slander, and struggles with what Guardian editor Katharine Viner has called the “waning power of evidence” and “diminishing status of truth.” Today more than ever, the news media’s role as a mediator and gatekeeper of civic discourse is being questioned. Jeffrey Rutenbeck, American University’s Dean of the School of Communication, voiced what many are feeling when he observed in a recent Knight Foundation report, “Journalism has had the luxury of not having to ask itself the existential question of why anyone should pay any attention to us at all.” He proposed an interesting way to tackle the problem.

Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education Filed by the ACRL Board on February 2, 2015. Adopted by the ACRL Board, January 11, 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. PDF Version Print copies may be purchased from the Association of College and Research Libraries for $15.00 for a package of 10, including standard postage.

RDA new cataloguing rules Why new rules, and what has it got to do with me? Resource Description and Access (RDA) is the cataloguing standard being introduced to replace Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, second edition (AACR2). National Library of Australia has announced that it will implement RDA in early 2013 (Australian Committee on Cataloguing n.d.). Building World Knowledge: Motivating Children to Read and Enjoy Informational Text Click the "References" link above to hide these references. Chall, J., Jacobs, V., & Baldwin, L. (1990). The reading crisis: Why poor children fall behind. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Cooperative Children's Book Center (2006).

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