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Wadjet

Wadjet
Two images of Wadjet appear on this carved wall in the Hatshepsut Temple at Luxor Wadjet (/ˈwɑːdˌdʒɛt/ or /ˈwædˌdʒɛt/; Egyptian wꜣḏyt, "green one"),[1] known to the Greek world as Uto /ˈjuːtoʊ/ or Buto /ˈbjuːtoʊ/ among other names, was originally the ancient local goddess of the city of Dep (Buto),[2] which became part of the city that the Egyptians named Per-Wadjet, House of Wadjet, and the Greeks called Buto (Desouk now),[3] a city that was an important site in the Predynastic era of Ancient Egypt and the cultural developments of the Paleolithic. She was said to be the patron and protector of Lower Egypt and upon unification with Upper Egypt, the joint protector and patron of all of Egypt with the "goddess" of Upper Egypt. The image of Wadjet with the sun disk is called the uraeus, and it was the emblem on the crown of the rulers of Lower Egypt. She was also the protector of kings and of women in childbirth. Etymology[edit] Protector of country, pharaohs, and other deities[edit] [edit] Related:  eyes-symbols-history-s243a

Caduceus Modern depiction of the caduceus as the symbol of commerce Hermes Ingenui[1] carrying a winged kerykeion upright in his left hand, Roman copy reflecting an unknown Greek original of the 5th century BCE. (Museo Pio-Clementino, Rome). By extension of its association with Mercury and Hermes, the caduceus is also a recognized symbol of commerce and negotiation, two realms in which balanced exchange and reciprocity are recognized as ideals.[5][6] This association is ancient, and consistent from the Classical period to modern times.[7] The caduceus is also used as a symbol representing printing, again by extension of the attributes of Mercury (in this case associated with writing and eloquence). The caduceus is often used incorrectly as a symbol of healthcare organisations and medical practice (especially in North America), due to confusion with the traditional medical symbol, the rod of Asclepius, although this has only one snake and is never depicted with wings. Ancient Near East[edit]

Horus Horus is one of the oldest and most significant deities in ancient Egyptian religion, who was worshipped from at least the late Predynastic period through to Greco-Roman times. Different forms of Horus are recorded in history and these are treated as distinct gods by Egypt specialists.[1] These various forms may possibly be different perceptions of the same multi-layered deity in which certain attributes or syncretic relationships are emphasized, not necessarily in opposition but complementary to one another, consistent with how the Ancient Egyptians viewed the multiple facets of reality.[2] He was most often depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine, or as a man with a falcon head.[3] Etymology[edit] Horus was also known as Nekheny, meaning "falcon". Some have proposed that Nekheny may have been another falcon-god, worshipped at Nekhen (city of the hawk), with which Horus was identified from early on. Note of changes over time[edit] Horus and the pharaoh[edit] Sky god[edit]

Semiramis Semiramis depicted as an armed Amazon in this eighteenth-century Italian illustration. For ancient Greeks[1] Semiramis (Greek: Σεμίραμις, Armenian: Շամիրամ Shamiram) was the legendary queen of king Ninus, succeeding him to the throne of Assyria. The legends narrated by Diodorus Siculus, Justin and others from Ctesias of Cnidus describe her and her relationship to King Ninus, himself a mythical king of Assyria, not attested in the Assyrian King List. Various places in Assyria and throughout Mesopotamia as a whole, Media, Persia, the Levant, Asia Minor, Arabia and the Caucasus bore the name of Semiramis, but slightly changed, even in the Middle Ages, and an old name of the city of Van was Shamiramagerd (in Armenian it means created by Semiramis). The indigenous Assyrians of Iraq, north east Syria, south east Turkey and north west Iran still name female children Semiramis. Biography according to Diodorus Siculus[edit] She then married Onnes or Menones, one of Ninus' generals.

Third Eye - Pineal Gland Third Eye - Pineal Gland The pineal gland (also called the pineal body, epiphysis cerebri, epiphysis or the "third eye") is a small endocrine gland. It produces melatonin, a hormone that affects the modulation of wake/sleep patterns and photoperiodic (seasonal) functions. The pineal gland is shaped like a tiny pine cone, hence its name. Pine Cone Pineal Gland Pseudoscience Theories While the physiological function of the pineal gland has been unknown until recent times, mystical traditions and esoteric schools have long known this area in the middle of the brain to be the connecting link between the physical and spiritual worlds. The third eye controls the various bio-rhythms of the body. The pineal gland's location deep in the brain seems to intimate hidden importance. Chakras - Spiraling Wheels or Cones of Energy 12 Around Spiraling Cones of Creation All-Seeing-Eye It's about the Eye, Zero Point, focusing your consciousness and trusting what you see. ShareThis

PAGANISM The Mother of All Religions - Paganism in Africa Keep in mind that all the African symbols and rituals (of its Mystery System) described in the following paragraphs preceded Ethiopian/Chaldean/Babylonian Albigensianism by over 100 years, Hinduism by over 1000 years, Judaism by over 3,000 years, Zoroastrianism and Buddhism by over 3,500 years, Christianity by over 4425 years and Islam by nearly 5000 years. Africans invented religion from which all the religions of the world took their bearing, ideas, dogma, structure, symbols, architecture, rituals and traditions. African Osirianism was founded by many, consolidated by Ausar in 4100 BCE. Africans created several Gods and do not worship the 'One Source,' which they revere and which in modern time, we call Tu-SoS. No religion or spiritual movement worships the 'One Source.' The Jews do not worship Tu-SoS which they call En-Sof, instead, they worship the ten Gods they created and called Attributes of the One Source. Osirianism's Holy day is Sunday. Sikhism. Egyptians' Lucky Girdle.

Pineal gland The pineal gland, also known as the pineal body, conarium or epiphysis cerebri, is a small endocrine gland in the vertebrate brain. It produces melatonin, a serotonin derived hormone, which affects the modulation of sleep patterns in both seasonal and circadian rhythms.[1][2] Its shape resembles a tiny pine cone (hence its name), and it is located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain, between the two hemispheres, tucked in a groove where the two halves of the thalamus join. Nearly all vertebrate species possess a pineal gland. The gland has been compared to the photoreceptive, so-called third parietal eye present in the epithalamus of some animal species, which is also called the pineal eye. René Descartes believed the pineal gland to be the "principal seat of the soul" and viewed it as the third eye.[6] Structure[edit] Blood supply[edit] Innervation[edit] The pineal gland receives a sympathetic innervation from the superior cervical ganglion. Histology[edit] Development[edit]

Bible History Online Images and Resources for Biblical History Dionysus The earliest cult images of Dionysus show a mature male, bearded and robed. He holds a fennel staff, tipped with a pine-cone and known as a thyrsus. Later images show him as a beardless, sensuous, naked or half-naked androgynous youth: the literature describes him as womanly or "man-womanish".[10] In its fully developed form, his central cult imagery shows his triumphant, disorderly arrival or return, as if from some place beyond the borders of the known and civilized. His procession (thiasus) is made up of wild female followers (maenads) and bearded satyrs with erect penises. He was also known as Bacchus (/ˈbækəs/ or /ˈbɑːkəs/; Greek: Βάκχος, Bakkhos), the name adopted by the Romans[12] and the frenzy he induces, bakkheia. In Greek mythology, he is presented as a son of Zeus and the mortal Semele, thus semi-divine or heroic: and as son of Zeus and Persephone or Demeter, thus both fully divine, part-chthonic and possibly identical with Iacchus of the Eleusinian Mysteries. Names Epithets

Westward We ask :- 1) Did peoples, cultures, languages and ideas migrate predominantly westward around the world in prehistoric and historic times? 2) Is there a probable physical cause for such a westward movement? 3) Given that the cause could be a natural one, and that humans might have existed as civilized beings for much longer than the academics think, is our real social history richer and more complex than the text books say? 4) Can we find reasons for losses ref-01 of history, technology and advanced knowledge? There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Modern `scientists' ref-02 & `historians' have long been telling us that human `civilization' only began about 5 (or maybe 6) thousand years ago - in the farming villages of Sumer - later Babylonia ref-03- and Persia. Have learned to be dubious of `experts' of all kinds, so glad to see some of our (and others') predictions coming up within a lifetime. Language - Writing - Civilization Scripts

Dionysian Mysteries The Dionysian Mysteries were a ritual of ancient Greece and Rome which used intoxicants and other trance-inducing techniques (like dance and music) to remove inhibitions and social constraints, liberating the individual to return to a natural state. It also provided some liberation for those marginalized by Greek society: women, slaves and foreigners. In their final phase the Mysteries shifted their emphasis from a chthonic, underworld orientation to a transcendental, mystical one, with Dionysus changing his nature accordingly (similar to the change in the cult of Shiva). By its nature as a mystery religion reserved for the initiated, many aspects of the Dionysian cult remain unknown and were lost with the decline of Greco-Roman polytheism; our knowledge is derived from descriptions, imagery and cross-cultural studies. Origins[edit] Early Dionysus cult[edit] Role of wine[edit] Rites[edit] Emergence and evolution[edit] Male initiation rituals[edit] Female initiation rituals[edit]

Ancient Egyptian Gods, Osiris, Isis, Hathor, Horus, Ra, Amun, Anubis, Nut, Ptah - Photos of Egypt - Images of Ancient Egypt - Pictures of Egypt - Photos of Ancient Egypt - Karnak, Pyramids, Tutankhamun, Abu Simbel, Aswan, The Nile, Edfu, Kom Ombo, Felucca Four Highly Recommended Telescope, Accessory and Astro Imaging suppliers in the UK These are suppliers I have used and their Helpfulness and Customer Service have been second-to-none.

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