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Wadjet (Another name for Sekhmet)

Wadjet (Another name for Sekhmet)
Two images of Wadjet appear on this carved wall in the Hatshepsut Temple at Luxor Wadjet (/ˈwɑːdˌdʒɛt/ or /ˈwædˌdʒɛt/; Egyptian wꜣḏyt, "green one"),[1] known to the Greek world as Uto /ˈjuːtoʊ/ or Buto /ˈbjuːtoʊ/ among other names, was originally the ancient local goddess of the city of Dep (Buto),[2] which became part of the city that the Egyptians named Per-Wadjet, House of Wadjet, and the Greeks called Buto (Desouk now),[3] a city that was an important site in the Predynastic era of Ancient Egypt and the cultural developments of the Paleolithic. She was said to be the patron and protector of Lower Egypt and upon unification with Upper Egypt, the joint protector and patron of all of Egypt with the "goddess" of Upper Egypt. The Going Forth of Wadjet was celebrated on December 25 with chants and songs. Etymology[edit] The name Wadjet[5] is derived from the term for the symbol of her domain, Lower Egypt, the papyrus.[6] Protector of country, pharaohs, and other deities[edit] See also[edit] Related:  eyes-symbols-history-s243a

Horus Horus is one of the oldest and most significant deities in ancient Egyptian religion, who was worshipped from at least the late Predynastic period through to Greco-Roman times. Different forms of Horus are recorded in history and these are treated as distinct gods by Egypt specialists.[1] These various forms may possibly be different perceptions of the same multi-layered deity in which certain attributes or syncretic relationships are emphasized, not necessarily in opposition but complementary to one another, consistent with how the Ancient Egyptians viewed the multiple facets of reality.[2] He was most often depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine, or as a man with a falcon head.[3] Etymology[edit] Horus was also known as Nekheny, meaning "falcon". Note of changes over time[edit] In early Egypt, Horus was the brother of Isis, Osiris, Set and Nephthys. Horus and the pharaoh[edit] Origin mythology[edit] Mythological roles[edit] Sky god[edit] God of war and hunting[edit]

Horned Serpent A Horned Serpent in a Barrier Canyon Style pictograph, Western San Rafael Swell region of Utah. The Horned Serpent appears in the mythologies of many Native Americans.[1] Details vary among tribes, with many of the stories associating the mystical figure with water, rain, lightning and/or thunder. Horned Serpents were major components of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex of North American prehistory.[2][3] Horned serpents also appear in European and Near Eastern mythology. In Native American cultures[edit] Rock art depicting a Horned Serpent, at Pony Hills and Cook's Peak, New Mexico Horned serpents appear in the oral history of numerous Native American cultures, especially in the Southeastern Woodlands and Great Lakes. Muscogee Creek traditions include a Horned Serpent and a Tie-Snake, estakwvnayv in the Muscogee Creek language. Yuchi people made effigies of the Horned Serpent as recently as 1905. Among Cherokee people, a Horned Serpent is called an uktena. Other known names[edit]

Third Eye - Pineal Gland Third Eye - Pineal Gland The pineal gland (also called the pineal body, epiphysis cerebri, epiphysis or the "third eye") is a small endocrine gland. It produces melatonin, a hormone that affects the modulation of wake/sleep patterns and photoperiodic (seasonal) functions. It is located near to the center of the brain between the two hemispheres, tucked in a groove where the two rounded thalamic bodies join. The pineal gland is shaped like a tiny pine cone, hence its name. Pine Cone Pineal Gland Pseudoscience Theories While the physiological function of the pineal gland has been unknown until recent times, mystical traditions and esoteric schools have long known this area in the middle of the brain to be the connecting link between the physical and spiritual worlds. The third eye controls the various bio-rhythms of the body. The pineal gland's location deep in the brain seems to intimate hidden importance. Chakras - Spiraling Wheels or Cones of Energy 12 Around Spiraling Cones of Creation

Ophion Sources[edit] Pherecydes of Syros's Heptamychia is the first attested mention of Ophion. The story was apparently popular in Orphic poetry, of which only fragments survive. Apollonius of Rhodes in his Argonautica (1.495f) summarizes a song of Orpheus: Lycophron (1191) relates that Zeus' mother, that is Rhea, is skilled in wrestling, having cast the former queen Eurynome into Tartarus. Nonnus in his Dionysiaca has Hera say (8.158f): Harmonia here is probably an error in the text for Eurynome. Beside the oracular wall she saw the first tablet, old as the infinite past, containing all the things in one: upon it was all that Ophion lord paramount had done, all that ancient Cronus accomplished. We also have fragments of the writings of the early philosopher Pherecydes of Syros (6th century BCE) who devised a myth or legend in which powers known as Zas and Chronos 'Time' and Chthonie 'Of the Earth' existed from the beginning and in which Chronos creates the universe. Interpretations[edit]

Pineal gland The pineal gland, also known as the pineal body, conarium or epiphysis cerebri, is a small endocrine gland in the vertebrate brain. It produces melatonin, a serotonin derived hormone, which affects the modulation of sleep patterns in both seasonal and circadian rhythms.[1][2] Its shape resembles a tiny pine cone (hence its name), and it is located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain, between the two hemispheres, tucked in a groove where the two halves of the thalamus join. Nearly all vertebrate species possess a pineal gland. The gland has been compared to the photoreceptive, so-called third parietal eye present in the epithalamus of some animal species, which is also called the pineal eye. Structure[edit] The pineal gland is reddish-gray and about the size of a grain of rice (5–8 mm) in humans, located just rostro-dorsal to the superior colliculus and behind and beneath the stria medullaris, between the laterally positioned thalamic bodies. Blood supply[edit] Histology[edit]

Snake worship The altar where Jory Goddess is worshiped. The photo is taken at the main temple in Belur Karnataka, India Hindu mythology[edit] Image of Manasa in a village in the Sundarbans, West Bengal, India. Devotions to Nagadevata The Nairs of Kerala and Tulu Bunts of Karnataka in South India still carry out these ancient customs At one time there were many prevalent different renditions of the serpent cult located in India. Nāgas form an important part of Hindu mythology. Lord Shiva also wears a snake around his neck Nag panchami is an important Hindu festival associated with snake worship which takes place of the fifth day of Shravana. Different districts of Bengal celebrated the serpent in various ways. These districts also worshipped an object known as a Karandi (Bhattacharyya 1965, p. 6).Resembling a small house made of cork, the Karandi is decorated with images of snakes, the snake goddess, and snake legends on its walls and roof (Bhattacharyya 1965, p. 6). Cambodian mythology[edit]

Dionysus The earliest cult images of Dionysus show a mature male, bearded and robed. He holds a fennel staff, tipped with a pine-cone and known as a thyrsus. Later images show him as a beardless, sensuous, naked or half-naked androgynous youth: the literature describes him as womanly or "man-womanish".[10] In its fully developed form, his central cult imagery shows his triumphant, disorderly arrival or return, as if from some place beyond the borders of the known and civilized. His procession (thiasus) is made up of wild female followers (maenads) and bearded satyrs with erect penises. Some are armed with the thyrsus, some dance or play music. He was also known as Bacchus (/ˈbækəs/ or /ˈbɑːkəs/; Greek: Βάκχος, Bakkhos), the name adopted by the Romans[12] and the frenzy he induces, bakkheia. Names Etymology The dio- element has been associated since antiquity with Zeus (genitive Dios). Epithets Dionysus was variably known with the following epithets: Acroreites at Sicyon.[24] Mythology

Snakes in mythology The serpent, or snake, is one of the oldest and most widespread mythological symbols. The word is derived from Latin serpens, a crawling animal or snake. Snakes have been associated with some of the oldest rituals known to humankind[1] and represent dual expression[2] of good and evil.[3] In some cultures snakes were fertility symbols, for example the Hopi people of North America performed an annual snake dance to celebrate the union of Snake Youth (a Sky spirit) and Snake Girl (an Underworld spirit) and to renew fertility of Nature. Historically, serpents and snakes represent fertility or a creative life force. This Cambodian statue, dated between 1150 and 1175 CE, depicts the meditating Buddha being shielded by the naga Mucalinda. Serpents are represented as potent guardians of temples and other sacred spaces. At Angkor in Cambodia, numerous stone sculptures present hooded multi-headed nāgas as guardians of temples or other premises. Serpents are connected with poison and medicine.

Dionysian Mysteries The Dionysian Mysteries were a ritual of ancient Greece and Rome which used intoxicants and other trance-inducing techniques (like dance and music) to remove inhibitions and social constraints, liberating the individual to return to a natural state. It also provided some liberation for those marginalized by Greek society: women, slaves and foreigners. In their final phase the Mysteries shifted their emphasis from a chthonic, underworld orientation to a transcendental, mystical one, with Dionysus changing his nature accordingly (similar to the change in the cult of Shiva). Origins[edit] Early Dionysus cult[edit] The ecstatic cult of Dionysus was originally thought to be a late arrival in Greece from Thrace or Asia Minor, due to its popularity in both locations and Dionysus' non-integration into the Olympian Pantheon. Role of wine[edit] Rites[edit] Emergence and evolution[edit] The mystery religions consisted of a series of initiations, benefiting the individual or their society.

Jesus Our Serpent Sermon delivered February 1, 2003 by Pastor Donald J. Gettys McDonald Road Seventh-day Adventist Church McDonald, Tennessee Biblical quotations are from the New International Version NIV unless otherwise noted. Numbers 21, John 3 I have a Quiz for you this morning: Who is Our King of Kings? Believe it or not Jesus is our serpent in the book of Numbers 21. What must the dying person behold to be saved? Come over here to John 3, where The most famous verse in the entire Bible is preceded by two verses that not one in a hundred could guess their words. "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that everyone who believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life." So here the Bible compares Jesus to that bronze serpent on that pole. Whenever I think of a Snake I think of the Devil. I admire the symbolism of Jesus. If we can discover how this came to be, perhaps we can stumble onto something that is really profound, something that is amazing. What saved the people?

Sekhmet (Dauter of Ra) In Egyptian mythology, Sekhmet /ˈsɛkˌmɛt/[1] or Sachmis (/ˈsækmɨs/; also spelled Sakhmet, Sekhet, or Sakhet, among other spellings) was originally the warrior goddess as well as goddess of healing for Upper Egypt, when the kingdom of Egypt was divided. She is depicted as a lioness, the fiercest hunter known to the Egyptians. It was said that her breath formed the desert. She was seen as the protector of the pharaohs and led them in warfare. Sekhmet also is a Solar deity, sometimes called the daughter of the sun god Ra and often associated with the goddesses Hathor and Bast. Etymology[edit] Sekhmet's name comes from the Ancient Egyptian word "sekhem" which means "power or might". History[edit] Bust of the Goddess Sakhmet, ca. 1390-1352 B.C.E. The warrior goddess Sekhmet, shown with her sun disk and cobra crown from a relief at the Temple of Kom Ombo. In order to placate Sekhmet's wrath, her priestesses performed a ritual before a different statue of the goddess on each day of the year.

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