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Responsive Menu Concepts

Responsive Menu Concepts
The following is a guest post by Tim Pietrusky. I know Tim from his prolific work on CodePen and from being a helpful community member there. He wrote to me with this guest post about responsive menus which I'm more than happy to share with you below. When it comes to responsive design we are faced with various techniques on how to best handle altering our navigation menus for small screens. Three of them are made with pure CSS and one uses a single line of JavaScript. Before We Start In the code presented in this article, I don’t use any vendor-prefixes to keep the CSS easier to see and understand. All menu concepts in this article are based on this simple HTML structure which I call basic menu. <nav role=""><ul><li><a href="#">Stream</a></li><li><a href="#">Lab</a></li><li><a href="#">Projects</a></li><li><a href="#">About</a></li><li><a href="#">Contact</a></li></ul></nav>​ To address small screens I use the same media query on all concepts. @media screen and (max-width: 44em) { } 1. 2. Related:  responsive design

Creating a Mobile-First Responsive Web Design Introduction We're going to walk through how to create an adaptive web experience that's designed mobile-first. This article and demo will go over the following: There is even more up to date responsive guidance on our new Web Fundamentals site. Why we need to create mobile-first, responsive, adaptive experiences How to structure HTML for an adaptive site in order to optimize performance and prioritize flexibility How to write CSS that defines shared styles first, builds up styles for larger screens with media queries, and uses relative units How to write unobtrusive Javascript to conditionally load in content fragments, take advantage of touch events and geolocation What we could do to further enhance our adaptive experience The Need for Adaptivity As the web landscape becomes increasingly complex, it's becoming extremely important to deliver solid web experiences to a growing number of contexts. However, mobile context is much more than just screen size. View the demo Structure Style Less JS

A Three Step Guide to Usability on the Mobile Web Designing mobile sites is a different kind of web design. Much like your first experience of designing for the desktop web, it can be both exhilarating and daunting in equal measures. So many possibilities, yet so many usability restrictions. Don't panic, we've been there too. This paper is our "101" guide to getting your design and usability principles right. We'll start by setting some mobile web design rules to live and die by... Five Rules for Designing Usable Mobile Web Sites 1: The mobile web is mobile2: Context is king3: The devices are (very) different4: Forget your dotcom thinking. Rule 1: The Mobile Web is Mobile Never overlook the obvious. Rule 2: Context is King When it comes to usability, context is everything. This point is critical to the success of your mobile site: your can no longer account for where your users are accessing your site from. Rule 3: The devices are (very) different Mobile devices are, of course, very different to desktop and laptop computers. Limit choices.

All about the design – top tips for designing mobile sites and apps from the professionals As mobile devices become increasingly capable and the mobile audience becomes increasingly sophisticated, companies are stretching the bounds of possibility when it comes to mobile sites, native applications and Web apps. It becomes all the more important to consider not just graphical design, but also the physical design of your mobile product. It is essential to know not only who will be using it, but how and where they will be using it. This is the fifth in our series of six app-related articles. The following guide was compiled from the responses of the following mobile design and usability gurus: All these experts spoke at Design for Mobile in Chicago, USA, September, 2010. The anatomy of good mobile design 1) Putting things in context Understand, respect and design for your users' contexts. 2) The mobile context Mobile means ‘on the go’ and ‘away from my desk’. 3) Make the most of the Platform Always design for mobile first – don’t just re-purpose your web site/app.

Home | mobiThinking A Responsive Web Design Tutorial for Beginners This is the second post in a series about Responsive Web Design, described in plain language from a front end designer. In our last post I wrote about three reasons responsive web design is something you should know about. We discussed the problems associated with the traditional method of designing a desktop and mobile version of a website. Essentially, there are just too many mobile devices hitting the market to tailor our websites to view well on them all. The thing I like about problems or challenges is that–if we let them–they make us better people and create space for innovation and solutions that may otherwise never be discovered. Designer and developer Ethan Marcotte was instrumental in solving this problem of device compatibility. In actuality, the problem is still being solved and responsive web design methods, tools and standards are still being developed and refined. Media Queries Responsive design uses a CSS3 feature called media queries. Break Points The Fluid Grid

20 Best Responsive Web Design Examples of 2012 The Boston Globe The largest responsive website to date, The Boston Globe handles loads of content effortlessly, keeping the site intuitive and the content easily accessible on the device of your choice. Smashing Magazine I love this site. I really do. Food Sense Clean layout, beautiful photography and playful iconography made me like this site immediately on my first visit. Andersson Wise Type designer, Jan Tschichold once said, ‘Simplicity of form is never a poverty, it is a great virtue.’ Sphero If you haven’t check out Sphero, you should. CSS Tricks It might be the conspicuous green frog that causes me love this site. Grey Goose The Grey Goose site shows that designing responsively does not limit our designs to columns of fluid text and images on solid backgrounds. New Adventures In Web Design With a name like “New Adventures In Web Design,” one would expect a responsive site for this web design conference. Lancaster University Fundraise.com Web Designer Wall Heathlife London & Partners Fork

How to Approach a Responsive Design - Upstatement Blog So I’ve got a confession to make: When we started working on the new Boston Globe website, we had never designed a responsive site before. This shouldn’t come as some huge shock. I mean, raise your hand if you’d built a full responsive site back in November 2010. Here at Upstatement, we experimented with how to solve design and layout problems within a responsive framework. Ready? Choose Your Weapon Before laying down a single pixel, there was an important decision to make: What design program to use? Eventually design would be done directly in the browser — there’s no better tool for interactive design, especially when you’re working with fluid layouts (more on all that later). So we lined up the usual suspects from Adobe. Hands down, the answer was InDesign. Even better, InDesign’s internal logic parallels that of web design and development. InDesign stylesheets InDesign’s master pages palette Like the web, InDesign also has a notion of templates. And Now It’s Time for a Breakdown 960px

Building a Responsive, Future-Friendly Web for Everyone This week’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas has seen the arrival of dozens of new devices from tablets to televisions. Some of these newfangled gadgets will soon be in the hands of consumers who will use them to access your website. Will your site work? No one wants to rewrite their website every time a new device or browser hits the web. Even if you aren’t a gadget lover, CES should help drive home the fundamental truth of today’s web — devices, they are a comin’. Basics: Further Reading: Future Friendly — An overview of how some of the smartest people in web design are thinking about the ever-broadening reach of the web: “We can’t be all things on all devices. Techniques:

Complex Navigation Patterns for Responsive Design The most frequently asked question I get since posting my responsive navigation patterns article is: How do I handle complex navigation for responsive designs?” Great question, but before we get down to brass tacks, I urge you: use mobile as an excuse to revisit your navigation. Look at your analytics. What are your experience’s key sections? Where are people spending most of their time? Another thing: if you have a zillion sections and pages, prioritize search. OK, now that all that’s out of the way, time for some real talk. Sometimes you just have a complex navigation. The Multi-Toggle Barack Obama's Multi-Toggle Navigation from his redesigned campaign site The multi-toggle is basically just nested accordions. Quick tip: use one of two emerging icons: the plus sign (+) or downward caret (▼ &#9660;) to let users know there’s more content. Pros Scannable – users can quickly scan parent categories before making a decision to go to the next level.Scalable – Got a menu that’s 17 levels deep?

Responsive web design: key tips and approaches Some time ago, designers knew the exact dimensions of work they were commissioned to do whether it be a book cover, poster, newspaper, etc. However, with the emergence of smart phones, iPads and other monitors with different sizes, aspect ratios and resolutions, we’ve lost control of our visual borders. It’s not surprising that responsive web design (RWD) has become the new buzz. This emerging trend is not about fashion or aesthetics; it is rather an attempt to solve usability problems that arise due to the various devices used to browse the Internet. In this article, I’ll describe the approaches used when designing for different devices, what screen sizes and resolutions should be taken into account, and how RWD works from a designer’s point of view. Responsive web design approaches When creating a website that is fit for all monitor screens, the most common approach is designing within the standard screen width and height. There are dozens of graphics display resolutions. In conclusion

Building Responsive Layouts presentation at Responsive Web Design Summit Today I spoke at the online conference Responsive Web Design Summit 2012 on Building Responsive Layouts. I talked about two of the core components of responsive web design: fluid/liquid layouts and media queries. Much of the talk was focused on fluid layout techniques and tips: how to build a basic two- or three-column all-fluid layout, how to create fluid grids with fixed-width margin and padding, how to create a hybrid fixed-fluid layout, and how to calculate nested width, margin, and padding values. You can view the slides on SlideShare, or download the slides here: Building Responsive Layouts (PDF, 2.4 mb) Here are several links to related resources, some of which are in the slides plus many that were not but which I recommend and think you’ll find useful. Responsive web design link hubs Responsive web design articles, tutorials, and tools Mobile viewports Dealing with IE 6-8 support Fluid/liquid layout Responsive web design inspiration and design patterns Related Posts:

A jQuery responsive images plugin to help ease the transition | Jquery Picture

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