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Cymatics

Cymatics
Resonance made visible with black seeds on a harpsichord soundboard Cornstarch and water solution under the influence of sine wave vibration Cymatics (from Greek: κῦμα "wave") is the study of visible sound co vibration, a subset of modal phenomena. Typically the surface of a plate, diaphragm, or membrane is vibrated, and regions of maximum and minimum displacement are made visible in a thin coating of particles, paste, or liquid.[1] Different patterns emerge in the excitatory medium depending on the geometry of the plate and the driving frequency. The apparatus employed can be simple, such as the old Chinese spouting bowl, or Chinese singing fountain, in which copper handles are rubbed and cause the copper bottom elements to vibrate.[citation needed] Other examples include the Chladni Plate[2] and the CymaScope. Etymology[edit] History[edit] On July 8, 1680, Robert Hooke was able to see the nodal patterns associated with the modes of vibration of glass plates. Influences in art[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cymatics

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Brainwave/Cymatic Frequency Listing This is a listing of frequencies that various parties have claimed can affect the human mind or body in some way. The following sorts of frequencies are included : Brainwave Frequencies - These are frequencies associated with various mental states. Theremin This article is about the instrument. For the inventor, see Léon Theremin. The theremin (/ˈθɛrəmɪn/[1] THERR-ə-min; originally known as the ætherphone/etherphone, thereminophone[2] or termenvox/thereminvox), is an early electronic musical instrument controlled without physical contact by the thereminist (performer).

Music visualization Print screen of preset included in MilkDrop version 1.04d Visualization techniques range from simple ones (e.g., a simulation of an oscilloscope display) to elaborate ones, which often include a plurality of composited effects. The changes in the music's loudness and frequency spectrum are among the properties used as input to the visualization. Cymatics and the New Age of Miracles with Dr. Sir Peter Guy Manners, M.D. Cymatics As Science In the early 18th century, the German physicist Ernst Chladni, the ''father of acoustics,'' covered plates with thin layers of sand, set them vibrating, and observed the patterns that were made in response to different sound stimuli. In 1967, nearly three hundred years later, Hans Jenny, a Swiss doctor, artist, and researcher, published Cymatics – The Structure and Dynamics of Waves and Vibrations. In this book, published in both German and English, Jenny, like his precursor, showed what happens when one takes various materials like sand, water, or iron filings, and places them on vibrating metal surfaces. When this is done, shapes and motion-patterns appear. Some of these patterns are nearly perfectly ordered and are stationary.

Music and its symbols Karlheinz Stockhausen's music generated the image above, while the one below was created by the saxophone of Jan Garbarek. All the images in this article are the work of the German researcher and photographer Alexander Lauterwasser. He created them by transferring the sound waves produced by the music into water, and photographing the results using reflected light. The figure below was created by the sound of the mantra Om. It strict symmetry contrasts with the less structured patterns created by Boulez's music above, but it has striking similarities with the Stockhausen figure at the head of the article. Unfortunately we cannot drill down further into the individual images as the precise work used to generate them is not specified,

Cymatic Ferrofluid In 2002, I bought a small amount of ferrofluid off the internet. It was around the time when I started to learn Processing. I began asking for advice on the Processing forum on how to translate the formulas for magnetism into code. I received a great deal of help and after a couple days, I had a working 2D prototype. I have been using some version of this prototype ever since. (Note, the 2D prototype code is extremely old and outdated.)

Grid Paper PDFs Free Online Graph Paper / Grid Paper PDFs Downloadable and very printable, I find these PDFs extremely useful. Tip number one! Though I do return the correct header for a PDF, sometimes Explorer gets confused when downloading... Locative media Locative media or Location-based media are media of communication functionally bound to a location. The physical implementation of locative media, however, is not bound to the same location to which the content refers. Location-based media (LBM) delivers multimedia and other content directly to the user of a mobile device dependent upon their location. Location information determined by means such as mobile phone tracking and other emerging Real-time locating system technologies like Wi-Fi or RFID can be used to customize media content presented on the device.

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