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11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation

11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation
In this day and age, where anyone with access to the internet can create a website, it is critical that we as educators teach our students how to evaluate web content. There are some great resources available for educating students on this matter, such as Kathy Schrock’s Five W’s of Website Evaluation or the University of Southern Maine’s Checklist for Evaluating Websites. Along with checklists and articles, you will also find wonderfully funny hoax websites, aimed at testing readers on their ability to evaluate websites. These hoax sites are a great way to bring humor and hands-on evaluation into your classroom, and test your students’ web resource evaluation IQ! Check out these 11 example hoax sites for use in your own classrooms: Of all of these, my favorite is always the Dihydrogen Monoxide website, which aims to ban dihydrogen monoxide and talks in detail about its dangers. Happy hoax-hunting! Like this: Like Loading...

http://teachbytes.com/2012/11/01/test-website-evaluation-with-10-hilarious-hoax-sites/

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Mrs Lodge's Library Life Update I hope everyone is having a fantastic school year! I miss being in school but I am enjoying my maternity leave with read more » AASL 2015 TPT Sale I'm throwing a TPT sale for AASL 2015! Everything is 20% off. Click below to get to my store and stock up on library read more » AASL 2015 Are you heading to AASL 2015? 10 Word Cloud Generators You Have Probably Never Tried A few days back, we looked at five great ways to incorporate word cloud generators into your classroom. There are obviously many more uses out there for them – but that is a discussion for another post. We’ve mentioned most of these before – in a post from way back when – so I won’t go into too much detail about each individual one, but we’ve added a few notable ones to the list. (Of note, the list is in no particular order). The vast majority of them work the same: plug your text into the box, select a few options, and you’ve got yourself a word cloud. Some offer more options than others, some offer word clouds with words going in any and all directions, some offer shapes, others create much simpler word clouds.

Felt Board - Mother Goose on the Loose Based on the award-winning early literacy program by Dr. Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Mother Goose on the Loose, and developed by the creators of the original Felt Board app, Felt Board – Mother Goose on the Loose can be used by parents and children at home, in early childhood programs, and by librarians as a supplement to the Mother Goose on the Loose parent-toddler program. Help Little Bo Peep find her lost sheep and dance them around the screen together in time to the music. Guide Jack and Jill up and down the hill and march with Grand Old Duke of York. Sound effect buttons like rhythm sticks, rattles and a rain stick are included for young children to interact with songs and rhymes as they are played. Songs and rhymes include: Old Mother Goose, Goosey Goosey Gander, Jack and Jill, Jack Be Nimble, 2 Little Monkeys, 5 Fat Sausages, Humpty Dumpty, Little Bo Peep, Little Miss Muffet, Hickory Dickory Dock, Eency Weency Spider, Row Row Row Your Boat, and more.

Close Reading Toolbox Freebie! This post originally appeared on the blog CreateTeachShare. Well, my school year has barely ended, and call me crazy, because I am already planning and creating for next year!! I have a list a mile long of new ideas that I can’t wait to try out for next year. My first one?!?! Close Reading Toolboxes!! Free eBook Library Join Oxford Owl!We’ve made all our FREE eBooks tablet-friendly, simply join us or log in above. sign up log in Malala: The girl who was shot for going to school Image copyright AFP One year ago schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen - her "crime", to have spoken up for the right of girls to be educated. The world reacted in horror, but after weeks in intensive care Malala survived. Her full story can now be told.

Present perfect aspect – tips and activities By Kerry G.Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield Tips and ideas from Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on teaching the present perfect aspect. Introduction When teaching the present perfect, or explaining the present perfect, it is often easiest to focus on the use of the present perfect than the meaning. This is especially true for the first time students encounter it (usually associated with the use of talking about experiences). However, sooner or later you will be looking at different uses of the present perfect, and more often than not its relation with the past tense. A huge bunch of resources for teaching the present perfect tense Almost universally, elementary learners of English are systematically introduced to the simple present and simple past forms. Then, somewhere around the end of what we consider to be elementary level and the beginning of pre-intermediate study, learners are introduced to the phenomenon known as the present perfect tense. In many cases, this is more than just a stumbling block on the road to learning English. This is primarily due to the fact that for many learners there is no tangible equivalent to the have/has + V3 in their first language. Even those languages that utilise a perfect tense may do so in a way radically different to English.

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