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Little Betty Bag: Free Pattern & Tutorial

Little Betty Bag: Free Pattern & Tutorial
I am so excited with how this little bag turned out! I have made five now, each time being able to prefect the pattern a little more, and it’s finally ready to release for your sewing pleasure. The style is a cross body, which is a personal favorite of mine. It allows for you to put it on and forget it. Especially handy at the grocery store, or any where else I need free hands to chase little ones. It’s fun to sew, and the possibilities for variation are endless. There are many variations that can be made to this bag, but I will let you use your imagination for those, and just go over the steps for the bag I made. Save on ink when printing! If you are new to sewing I have a Sewing Tips Directory that might come in handy. Fabric requirements: A half a yard total is more than enough to make the bag body. A heavier fabric works best, like a canvas, twill, or anything that has a sturdy weight. Supplies: Preparing the Pattern and Fabric Cuts: You will cut as follows: Bag Assembly:

Travel Wallet Project Create a travel accessory that is uniquely yours and save money to boot on preparations for your next great adventure. Final Result Materials • 33cm x 28cm cotton fabric - Michael Miller ‘Licorice Dots’ • two 23cm x 28cm cotton fabric - Michael Miller ‘Licorice Dots’ • 33cm x 28cm cotton fabric - white/black dot • 18cm x 15cm cotton fabric - black/white dot • 42cm x 10cm cotton fabric - pink/white dot • 17cm x 7cm cotton fabric - pink/white dot • 20cm x 18cm cotton fabric - green/white dot • 11cm x 7cm clear PVC plastic• 60cm x 90cm wide heavy fusible interfacing • 5cm x 10mm black elastic • 2 press studs • Gutermann black sewing thread • scissors • pins • ruler/tape measure • iron • sewing machine Step 1 InterfacingCut a piece of interfacing for each of the cotton fabric pieces. Step 2 Left long pocketFold and press in half (wrong sides together) one 23cm x 28cm licorice dots fabric. Step 3 Right angled pocketFold other 23cm x 28cm licorice dots fabric in half, right sides together. Step 4

Make A 6-Pocket Mini Pocketbook I’m sure that many of you, like me, are on an eternal quest for organization. I know I’m not alone in finding the Container Store’s promise of a perfect, organized life utterly seductive. But here’s the thing…I don’t really like purging, I love my stuff. Therefore I also love pretty things in which to stash my stuff, so I get to enjoy my fantasy of being organized and contained. This tutorial is about helping you stay organized, in a quick, easy, and super-cute way. It is a distilled version of the Holland Cox pocketbook, and is a breeze to make. the pattern …is only four rectangles. the body is 7.25″ tall.the large pocket is 5.5″ tallthe medium pocket is 4.25″ tallthe small pocket is 3″ tall materials needed I chose a vintage cotton canvas for the body in a bright retro floral, and quilting weight cotton in a matching color for the interior. You’ll also need a button and a bit of elastic for the closure, and a bit of ribbon for the pen. start with the pockets 1. 2. the closure 3. 4. 6.

Zipper Card Pouch Have you ever had too many cards that your wallet can handle? Be selective and get only those cards that you might be using in a particular shopping mall but end up they were the wrong one? Or, may be just forgot to “update” the cards in the wallet on your next trip? Can’t find the cards you thought you have already put into your wallet? I am not a big fan of big wallet, with the increasing numbers of cards that I have, my decent size wallet is no longer able to buckle up. This zipper pouch can hold up to 30 plastic cards (similar to credit cards), and more for thinner cards, business calling card for example. Get the pattern and tutorial to sew one yourself after the jump and don’t have to struggle with the cards anymore. {Get pattern and tutorial on next page.} Pages: 1 2 Get all updates via email: Highlights from Our Partners

Receipt/ Coupon Organizer Tutorial My sister asked for a small pocket organizer to keep receipts in for Christmas. I knew I could get a basic one from an office supply store, but all that boring black plastic seemed like it needed some fancifying. After checking out some examples on the internet, this seemed like something I could handle. I think you could too, if this is something that would help keep your life both fancy and organized, so here’s how I did it. Materials: A piece of fabric cut to cover the outside of your organizer – mine was a legal size, so it was 10.5″ by 18 3/4″ (you only need to add seam allowance to the bottom edget of the fabric i.e. make your fabric piece about 1/2 inch longer than it needs to be) Wide bias tape long enough to go around the outside edges – mine was about 60″. You can either make your own bias tape, or purchase it in a package. First, turn under and sew a seam across the bottom edge of your fabric piece. Then, when you’re done, this is what you’ll have.

2 Pocket, Ultra Slim Fabric Card Case A few weeks ago, I went to Dallas for the wedding of a friend of mine from college, and unsurprisingly, the reception ended up doubling as a mini college reunion. Some of those people I literally hadn’t seen since graduation day. Naturally, the experience got me thinking about the thing I am always thinking about: sewing. (really). I already make a cute little single pocket card case/wallet thing that people love to impulse-buy at craft shows, but occasionally I get asked about one with two pockets, that would fold in half. why 19th street? Remembering our 19th street adventures made me think of that critical accessory (nobody carried purses when we went out), and how a handmade version would be pretty cute, and super useful. I also used lightweight fusible interfacing, but that’s also optional, especially if you use something a bit heavier for the outside. the pattern…is really just two rectangles. time to start sewing! 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. And viola!

traits of the disciplined mind Secrets Of Excellent Conversationalists The solution to the age-old problem of understanding others may be as simple as taking the time to improve your active listening skills. Active listening is all about building rapport, understanding and trust. Your “likability” factor is largely determined by your ability to effectively listen to client and customer suggestions and successfully respond to their needs, requests and concerns. Related: 5 Ways to Be a Better Listener 1. 2. Related: For Better Conversations, Replace 'How Are You?' 3. 4. Related: The 3 Qualities of Likable People 5. 6. Related: Break the Ice: 8 Networking Tips for Introverts

Vintage Ad Browser 8 Things Everybody Ought to Know About Concentrating “Music helps me concentrate,” Mike said to me glancing briefly over his shoulder. Mike was in his room writing a paper for his U.S. History class. On his desk next to his computer sat crunched Red Bulls, empty Gatorade bottles, some extra pocket change and scattered pieces of paper. In the pocket of his sweat pants rested a blaring iPod with a chord that dangled near the floor, almost touching against his Adidas sandals. Mike made a shift about every thirty seconds between all of the above. Do you know a person like this? The Science Behind Concentration In the above account, Mike’s obviously stuck in a routine that many of us may have found ourselves in, yet in the moment we feel it’s almost an impossible routine to get out of. When we constantly multitask to get things done, we’re not multitasking, we’re rapidly shifting our attention. Phase 1: Blood Rush Alert When Mike decides to start writing his History essay, blood rushes to his anterior prefrontal cortex. Phase 2: Find and Execute

WolfDreamer: Private-POM Ok, second in the group is Private. Cute, naive, and the youngest of the team... he keeps them all grounded. He loves his 'Lunacorn' doll...even if the others kid him about it. As always, if you find any problems in the pattern... or just get confused, let me know - I'll get back at ya ASAP :D MATERIALS: WW yarn in black and white, with a small amount of orange/yellow for beak and feet G hook 15mm google eyes Fiberfill Yarn needle Sewing thread in suitable colors to match yarn and sewing needle Gauge isn't important to this doll. Numbers at the end of each round or row indicate how many total stitches should be in that round or row. I recommend reading through each set of instructions before beginning, to familiarize yourself with the progression of that particular piece. Pinning all the parts together before sewing is also highly preferable. Attach yarn to center back of piece. FEET (make 4): Using orange/yellow: Take two of the 'feet' and place them together, matching up the toes.

Palette Search #d9e8c3 #ced181 #7c8f50 #555e32 #bf867c #d4b9b9 Find The Palettes You Love turkey tones posted 11.24.11 comments 1 cocoa tones posted 11.23.11 comments 1 shelled tones posted 11.21.11 comments 3 berry fresh posted 11.18.11 comments 2 pink tints posted 11.07.11 comments 0 succulent tones posted 11.06.11 comments 6 vintage tones posted 11.02.11 comments 1 tulip tones posted 11.02.11 comments 0 ShareThis Copy and Paste

Block Stitch Afghan : the way I do it !!!! .....what about two more pictures of my blanket to be???? Some of you asked me how the "dots" ( I call them "rice grains"!!!) can pop out in this way, so I thought it will be nice if I show you how this happens!!!! Happy about that??? Yes, I imagine so! Collect just few things : + hook + yarn in different colours + scissors + tapestry needle This is the chart (american crochet terminology), drawn by myself (!!!!!!) Your foundation chain will have these characteristics : chain 4, add as many as you like groups of "chain 3". Choose the colour you would love to start with and make a slip knot. Chain 20 stitches Chain 2 more (total : 22 stitches) and make a single crochet (or SC) in the 7th stitch from the hook (that is the previous stitch 16 on the foundation chain!) Now, chain 2 ... ... skip 2 stitches of the foundation chain and work 1 SC in the 3rd stitch (that is the previous 13 stitch of your foundation chain!) Again : chain 2, skip 2, SC in third stitch (previous #10!) Cut the yarn Row 1 : Row 2 :

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