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Rusalka

Rusalka
In Slavic mythology, a rusalka (plural: rusalki or rusalky) is a female ghost, water nymph, succubus, or mermaid-like demon that dwelt in a waterway. Other terms for these spirits include vila (plural: vily), wiła, willy (plural: willies), samovila, samodiva, rusavka, and mavka. According to most traditions, the rusalki were fish-women, who lived at the bottom of rivers. In the middle of the night, they would walk out to the bank and dance in meadows. If they saw handsome men, they would fascinate them with songs and dancing, mesmerize them, then lead them away to the river floor to their death. Origin[edit] In most versions, the rusalka is an unquiet dead being, associated with the "unclean force". The ghostly version is the soul of a young woman who had died in or near a river or a lake and came back to haunt that waterway. Rusalki can also come from unbaptized children, often those who were born out of wedlock and drowned by their mothers for that reason. Description[edit] Related:  European Water Deities

Vodyanoy Vodyanoy is said to appear as a naked old man with a frog-like face, greenish beard, and long hair, with his body covered in algae and muck, usually covered in black fish scales. He has webbed paws instead of hands, a fish's tail, eyes that burn like red-hot coals. He usually rides along his river on a half-sunk log, making loud splashes. Consequently, he is often dubbed "grandfather" or "forefather" by the local people. Local drownings are said to be the work of the vodyanoy (or rusalkas). When angered, the vodyanoy breaks dams, washes down water mills, and drowns people and animals. Vodník[edit] Typical projection of vodník in Czech or Slovak folklore. Czech,Slovenian and Slovak tales have both evil and good vodníci (relative to human beings) who do (or don't, respectively) try to drown people when they happen to swim in their territory. Cultural references[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Rose, Carol (2001).

Top 10 Mysterious People Mysteries Over the centuries, history is filled with wonderful tales of mysterious people – many of whom are never identified. This list is a selection of the most significant or mysterious people of this variety. As usual, if you know of other fascinating people that would suit a similar follow up list, be sure to tell us in the comments. Monsieur Chouchani (died 1968) is the nickname of an anonymous and mysterious Jewish teacher who taught a number of highly regarded students including Emmanual Levinas (pictured above) and Elie Wiesel in Europe after World War II. Very little is known about Chouchani, including his real name. There is no known body of work by Chouchani himself, but he left a very strong intellectual legacy via his students. The Poe Toaster is the nickname given to a mysterious man who pays annual tribute to Poe by visiting his grave every year. The Toaster wears a black hat and coat and hides his face with a hood or scarf. Fulcanelli (1839 – ? D. The Count of St.

Mummy Mummies of humans and other animals have been found on every continent,[1] both as a result of natural preservation through unusual conditions, and as cultural artifacts. Over one million animal mummies have been found in Egypt, many of which are cats.[2] (See: Animal mummy) In addition to the well-known mummies of Ancient Egypt, deliberate mummification was a feature of several ancient cultures in areas of South America and Asia which have very dry climates. The oldest known deliberate mummy is a child, one of the Chinchorro mummies found in the Camarones Valley, Chile, which dates around 5050 BCE.[3] The oldest known naturally mummified human corpse is a severed head dated as 6,000 years old, found in 1936 CE at the site named Inca Cueva No. 4 in South America.[4] Etymology and meaning[edit] History of mummy studies[edit] Howard Carter opens the innermost shrine of King Tutankhamen's tomb near Luxor, Egypt. Types of mummies[edit] The Egyptian mummies[edit] Mummy in the British Museum

Veles (god) Veles is one of few Slavic gods for which evidence of offerings can be found in all Slavic nations. The Primary Chronicle, a historical record of the early Eastern Slavic state, is the earliest and most important record, mentioning a god named Volos several times. Many etymologists, however, suppose them two different gods. Here, Volos is mentioned as god of cattle and peasants, who will punish oath-breakers with diseases, the opposite of Perun who is described as a ruling god of war who punishes by death in battle. Veles in Baltic state of Kievan Rus meant died souls of ancestors (Lith veles means died souls), later Slavs took the word and adopted it to their god. Another parallel to Norse mythology is that a 'Völva' was a 'Seeress' that was connected with water and foretelling, called 'Völuspa' (that is, Völva+Spake/Speech). The name may also be related to Slavic terminology for oxen, for which the South Slavs and Russians all use "вол/vol."

Hecate Name[edit] The etymology of the name Hecate (Ἑκάτη, Hekátē) is not known . Suggested derivations include: From the Greek word for 'will'.[8]From Ἑκατός Hekatos, an obscure epithet of Apollo.[9] This has been translated as "she that operates from afar", "she that removes or drives off",[10] "the far reaching one" or "the far-darter".[11]the name of the Egyptian goddess of childbirth, Heqet, has been compared.[12] In Early Modern English, the name was also pronounced disyllabic and sometimes spelled Hecat. The spelling Hecat is due to Arthur Golding's 1567 translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses,[13] and this spelling without the final E later appears in plays of the Elizabethan-Jacobean period.[14] Noah Webster in 1866 particularly credits the influence of Shakespeare for the then-predominant disyllabic pronunciation of the name.[15] Representations[edit] Statuette of Triple-bodied Hekate. The earliest Greek depictions of Hecate are single faced, not three-formed. Mythology[edit]

Skeleton (undead) A CG art skeleton, as commonly found in modern fantasy-theme games Figurines and images of skeletons doing routine things are common in Mexico's Day of the Dead celebration, where skulls symbolize life and their familiar circumstances invite levity. "The Boy Who Wanted the Willies" is a Brothers Grimm fairy tale in which a boy named Hans joins a circle of dancing skeletons. Mekurabe are rolling skulls with eyeballs who menace Taira no Kiyomori in Japanese folklore. The animated skeleton features in some Gothic fiction. They have also been used and portrayed in fantasy role-playing games or adventure games such as Dungeons and Dragons and Minecraft.

Neck (water spirit) The Nyx/Nixie (German: Nix/Nixie/Nyx, Norwegian: Nøkk or plural: Nøkken) are shapeshifting water spirits who usually appear in human form. These spirits have appeared in the myths and legends of all Germanic peoples in Europe.,[1] Although perhaps most known in Norwegian and Scandinavian folklore. In recent times such creatures have usually been depicted as human in shape (albeit in many cases shapeshifting). However, the English Knucker is generally depicted as a wyrm or dragon, thus attesting to the survival of the other usage as any "water-being" rather than an exclusively humanoid creature. Their sex, bynames, and various animal-like transformations vary geographically. The German Nix and his Scandinavian counterparts are males. The names are held to derive from Common Germanic *nikwus or *nikwis(i), derived from PIE *neigw ("to wash").[2] It is related to Sanskrit nḗnēkti, Greek νίζω nízō and νίπτω níptō, and Irish nigh' (all meaning to wash or be washed).[3]

Aspalis In Greek mythology, Aspalis (Ἁσπαλίς) was a local heroine from Melite in Phthia whose story was apparently meant to provide an etiology for the local surname and cult of Artemis. As in certain Artemis mythology,[1] she hanged herself and her body disappeared. The exact story of Aspalis, known from Antoninus Liberalis, is as follows. Melite was once ruled by a tyrant so cruel that the citizens dared not pronounce his real name, dubbing him Tartarus. He would order for the most beautiful girls to be brought to him and made them his concubines against their will. When he sent for Aspalis, daughter of Argaeus, the girl hanged herself rather than be violated. Aspalis was speculated to have originally been a western Semitic hunting goddess identified with Artemis.[3]

Revenant A revenant is a visible ghost or animated corpse that was believed to return from the grave to terrorize the living.[1] The word "revenant" is derived from the Latin word, reveniens, "returning" (see also the related French verb "revenir", meaning "to come back"). Vivid stories of revenants arose in Western Europe (especially Great Britain, and were later carried by Anglo-Norman invaders to Ireland) during the High Middle Ages. Though later legend and folklore depicts revenants as returning for a specific purpose (e.g., revenge against the deceased's killer), in most Medieval accounts they return to harass their surviving families and neighbours. Revenants share a number of characteristics with folkloric vampires. Many stories were documented by English historians in the Middle Ages. Analysis[edit] Medieval stories of revenants have common features. Comparison to other folkloristic and mythological undead[edit] Selected stories[edit] William of Newburgh[edit] William of Newburgh (1136?

Nerthus Nerthus (1905) by Emil Doepler. In Germania, Tacitus records that the remote Suebi tribes were united by their veneration of the goddess at his time of writing and maintained a sacred grove on an (unspecified) island and that a holy cart rests there draped with cloth, which only a priest may touch. The priests feel her presence by the cart, and, with deep reverence, attend her cart, which is drawn by heifers. The name Nerthus is generally held to be a Latinized form of Proto-Germanic *Nerþuz, which is the Proto-Germanic precursor to the Old Norse deity name Njörðr, who is a male deity in works recorded in the 13th century. Etymology[edit] Nerthus is often identified with the Vanr Njörðr who is attested in various 13th century Old Norse works and in numerous Scandinavian place names. Germania[edit] Theories and interpretations[edit] Nerthus typically is identified as a Vanir goddess. Modern influence[edit] The minor planet 601 Nerthus is named after Nerthus. See also[edit] Notes[edit]

Sedna (mythology) Sedna (Inuktitut: ᓴᓐᓇ, Sanna) is the goddess of the sea and marine animals in Inuit mythology, also known as the Mother of the Sea or Mistress of the Sea. The story of Sedna, which is a creation myth, describes how she came to rule over Adlivun, the Inuit underworld. Sedna is also known as Arnakuagsak or Arnaqquassaaq (Greenland) and Sassuma Arnaa ("Mother of the Deep", West Greenland) and Nerrivik ("Table", northern Greenland) or Nuliajuk (District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories, Canada). She is sometimes known by other names by different Inuit groups such as Arnapkapfaaluk ("Big Bad Woman") of the Copper Inuit from the Coronation Gulf area[1] and Takánakapsâluk or Takannaaluk (Igloolik). More than one version of the Sedna legend exists. In another version of the legend, she is dissatisfied with men found for her by her father and so marries a dog. In the Netsilik region, the story states that Nuliayuk was a mistreated orphan. Osbourne, MaryJane.

Zombie Zombies have a complex literary heritage, with antecedents ranging from Richard Matheson and H. P. Lovecraft to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein drawing on European folklore of the undead. George A. The English word "zombie" is first recorded in 1819, in a history of Brazil by the poet Robert Southey, in the form of "zombi".[3] The Oxford English Dictionary gives the origin of the word as West African, and compares it to the Kongo words nzambi (god) and zumbi (fetish). Folk beliefs[edit] Haitian tradition[edit] It has been suggested that the two types of zombie reflect soul dualism, a belief of Haitian Vodou. While most scholars have associated the Haitian zombie with African cultures, a connection has also been suggested to the island's indigenous Taíno people, partly based on an early account of native shamanist practices written by the Hieronymite monk Ramón Pané, a companion of Christopher Columbus.[10][11][12] African and related legends[edit] Evolution of the zombie archetype[edit]

Nehalennia Nehalennia (spelled variously) is a goddess. Of unclear origin, perhaps Germanic or Celtic, Nehalennia is attested on and depicted upon numerous votive altars discovered around what is now the province of Zeeland, the Netherlands, where the Rhine River flowed into the North Sea. Worship of Nehalennia dates back at least to the 2nd century BC, and veneration of the goddess flourished in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. Inscriptions and depictions[edit] Nehalennia is attested on 28 inscriptions discovered in the Dutch town of Domburg on the Zeeland coast, when a storm eroded dunes in 1645, disclosing remains of a temple devoted to the previously unattested goddess Nehalennia.[1] A similar number were discovered in 1971-72 in the town of Colijnsplaat, and two others have been found in the Cologne-Deutz area of what is now Cologne, Germany.[2] The loaves that Nehalennia is depicted with on her altars have been identified as duivekater, "oblong sacrificial loaves in the shape of a shin bone".

Gefjon The Prose Edda and Heimskringla both report that Gefjon plowed away what is now lake Mälaren, Sweden, and with this land formed the island of Zealand, Denmark. In addition, the Prose Edda describes that not only is Gefjon a virgin herself, but that all who die a virgin become her attendants. Heimskringla records that Gefjon married the legendary Danish king Skjöldr and that the two dwelled in Lejre, Denmark. Scholars have proposed theories about the etymology the name of the goddess, connections to fertility and ploughing practices, the implications of the references made to her as a virgin, five potential mentions of the goddess in the Old English poem Beowulf, and potential connections between Gefjon and Grendel's Mother and/or the goddesses Freyja and Frigg. Etymology[edit] The etymology of the name Gefjon has been a matter of dispute. A Finnish word for "bride's outfit, trousseau" may derive from Gefjon's name.[5] Attestations[edit] Poetic Edda[edit] Prose Edda[edit] Heimskringla[edit]

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