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A Small Group of Companies Have Enormous Power Over the World

A Small Group of Companies Have Enormous Power Over the World
October 31, 2012 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. In October of 2011, New Scientist reported that a scientific study on the global financial system was undertaken by three complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland. The conclusion of the study revealed what many theorists and observers have noted for years, decades, and indeed, even centuries: “An analysis of the relationships between 43,000 transnational corporations has identified a relatively small group of companies, mainly banks, with disproportionate power over the global economy.” The mapping of ‘power’ was through the construction of a model showing which companies controlled which other companies through shareholdings. The top 50 companies on the list of the “super-entity” included (as of 2007):

http://www.alternet.org/world/no-conspiracy-theory-small-group-companies-have-enormous-power-over-world

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Power Shift The end of the Cold War has brought no mere adjustment among states but a novel redistribution of power among states, markets, and civil society. National governments are not simply losing autonomy in a globalizing economy. They are sharing powers -- including political, social, and security roles at the core of sovereignty -- with businesses, with international organizations, and with a multitude of citizens groups, known as nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The steady concentration of power in the hands of states that began in 1648 with the Peace of Westphalia is over, at least for a while.-1

Study shows powerful corporations really do control the world's finances (PhysOrg.com) -- For many years conventional wisdom has said that the whole world is controlled by the monied elite, or more recently by the huge multi-national corporations that seem to sometime control the very air we breathe. Now, new research by a team based in ETH-Zurich, Switzerland, has shown that what we’ve suspected all along, is apparently true. The team has uploaded their results onto the preprint server arXiv. Using data obtained (circa 2007) from the Orbis database (a global database containing financial information on public and private companies) the team, in what is being heralded as the first of its kind, analyzed data from over 43,000 corporations, looking at both upstream and downstream connections between them all and found that when graphed, the data represented a bowtie of sorts, with the knot, or core representing just 147 entities who control nearly 40 percent of all of monetary value of transnational corporations (TNCs). Via Sciencenews.org

Gustavus Myers, History of the Great American Fortunes, part 3, vol 3, ch 8 “Great is Mr. Morgan’s power, greater in some respects even than that of President or kings,” wrote a seasoned British observer some years ago 1 which fact, patent to even the casual onlooker, easily passes uncontradicted. Who, indeed, can gainsay its truth ? Above all forms of law and functionaries of office, above the highest representative bodies and tribunals, above enactments and Constitutions, supreme above eighty-five millions of American people, this one man towers with a hold and grasp of power as tremendous as it is portentous. The X factor in the Norwegian economy Norway’s GNP per capita is among the highest in the world, second only to Luxembourg. (Photo: Colourbox) Over the course of a century Norway has transformed itself from being a relatively poor country of fishermen, tenant farmers and loggers into one of the world’s richest countries. Norway has done quite well during the global financial crisis; the country has hardly any unemployment to speak of, and house prices continue to rocket also after the credit crunch. Norway’s GNP per capita is among the highest in the world, second only to Luxembourg. Production has increased tenfold

Massive Leak Reveals Criminality, Paranoia, Among Corporate Titans LONDON - February 26 - WikiLeaks begins to publish today over five million e-mails obtained by Anonymous from "global intelligence" company Stratfor. The emails, which reveal everything from sinister spy tactics to an insider trading scheme with Goldman Sachs (see below), also include several discussions of the Yes Men and Bhopal activists. (Bhopal activists seek redress for the 1984 Dow Chemical/Union Carbide gas disaster in Bhopal, India, that led to thousands of deaths, injuries in more than half a million people, and lasting environmental damage.) Many of the Bhopal-related emails, addressed from Stratfor to Dow and Union Carbide public relations directors, reveal concern that, in the lead-up to the 25th anniversary of the Bhopal disaster, the Bhopal issue might be expanded into an effective systemic critique of corporate rule, and speculate at length about why this hasn't yet happened—providing a fascinating window onto what at least some corporate types fear most from activists.

Worldclock POODWADDLE WORLD CLOCKThe World Stats Counter (V 7.0) This minute 250 babies will be born, 100 people will die, 20 violent crimes will be reported, and the US debt will climb $1 million. The World Clock tells more than time. About OverviewThey Rule aims to provide a glimpse of some of the relationships of the US ruling class. It takes as its focus the boards of some of the most powerful U.S. companies, which share many of the same directors. Some individuals sit on 5, 6 or 7 of the top 1000 companies. How To [Read/Tip Off] Zero Hedge Without Attracting The Interest Of [Human Resources/The Treasury/Black Helicopters] It seems prudent to make some suggestions about contacting the Zero Hedge team.1. Don't email us directly from work. Somewhere out there, there is a log with your address and ours on it. If your employer is likely to peruse such things (pretty much guaranteed if you work at a financial institution) you might be in for a bit of scrutiny. Don't play that game. 2.

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