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Americans at War

Americans at War
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Barbed Wire Baseball By Phil Nast, retired middle school teacher and freelance writer Found In: social studies, 3-5, 6-8 Barbed Wire Baseball by Marissa Moss and Yuko Shimizu is a story about one mans love of baseball and the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Kenichi Zenimura (1900-1968) had been playing ball most of his life when Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1941. Energetic prose and dynamic illustrations that combine brush and ink with computer coloring make Barbed Wire Baseball a good introduction to Internment during WWII for K-8 social studies. Students will learn more in this entry for Kenichi Zenimura at the Nisei Baseball Research Project. Japanese-American Internment provides a brief overview for grades 4-8 and links to websites and documents. Related Lesson Japanese American Internment Using primary sources, students in grades 5-8 explore the internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans during WWII. Related Primary Source Documents Related Books

World War II Veterans with Stories: Experiencing War: Veterans History Project (Library of Congress US History Timeline: War of Independence Before 1600 | 1600 - 1700 | 1700 - 1800 | 1800 - 1900 | 1900 - 2000 | American Revolution Timeline | Cold War Timeline 1774 - September 5 to October 26, the First Continental Congress meets in Philadelphia with 56 delegates, representing every colony, except Georgia. Attendants include Patrick Henry, George Washington, Sam Adams and John Hancock. On September 17, the Congress declares its opposition to the Coercive Acts, saying they are "not to be obeyed," and also promotes the formation of local militia units. On October 14, a Declaration and Resolves is adopted that opposes the Coercive Acts, the Quebec Act, and other measure taken by the British that undermine self-rule. 1775 - February 1, in Cambridge, Mass., a provincial congress is held during which John Hancock and Joseph Warren begin defensive preparations for a state of war. April 18, 1775 - General Gage orders 700 British soldiers to Concord to destroy the colonists' weapons depot. August 27-29, 1776 - Gen. July 6, 1777 - Gen.

Classroom | War of 1812 In the Classroom These lesson plans were designed to enhance the educational value of the PBS program The War of 1812 for students in elementary, middle and high school. Every attempt has been made to ensure that the plans are congruent with bi-national learning standards (42.3 KB) . The lessons typically use program segments and broad thematic strands. They integrate and honor the contributions of all groups involved in the War. Teachers should feel free to adapt and modify any lesson to the needs of their students, regardless of grade level. We include the following special note to our Canadian educators; while the learning expectations for the War of 1812 reside at grade seven, we have included them across all three levels in the matrix. Through the lessons presented here teachers and students can examine not only the causes, battles and results of the War, but also delve into the very “human stories of the war, including those of ordinary citizens and eminent historical characters.”

World War II resources (Virtual Programs & Services, Library of Congress) Compiled by Mark F. Hall, Digital Reference Specialist World War II (1939-1945) was the largest international event of the twentieth century and one of the major turning points in U.S. and world history. In the six years between the invasion of Poland and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the world was caught up in the most destructive war in history. Armed forces of more than seventeen million fought on the land, in the air, and on the sea. The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide and diverse selection of materials relating to this period. This guide gathers in one place links to World War II related resources throughout the Library of Congress Web site. Library of Congress Web Sites | External Web Sites | Selected Bibliography Library of Congress Web Sites After the Day of Infamy: "Man-on-the-Street" Interviews Following the Attack on Pearl Harbor America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA and OWI, ca. 1935-1945 February 4 June 6

United States History • Skip Navigation • Skip to main content United States History Native Americans: Stereotypes and Assimilation Native American History: John Smith and the Powhatan Indian Removal The American Revolution and the Enlightenment The Boston Massacre Espionage in the American RevolutionThe Loyalists US Constitution versus the Articles of Confederation US Constitution: The Preamble US Constitution: The Bill of Rights US Constitution: The Powers of the PresidencyThe Alien and Sedition ActsViews of Antebellum SlaveryThe Cotton Gin The Age of ReformManifest Destiny and Westward Expansion Westward Expansion and the African-American Experience Westward Expansion at Firsthand: Letters of Anna Ketchum and Ruhamah Hayes Racial Violence and Jim Crow America: Lynchings and the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 World War I 1920s Consumer CultureWoman Suffrage, 1890 - 1920The AutomobileWorld War II: The HomefrontThe Manhattan ProjectThe Civil Rights MovementTet and the Vietnam War Back to History Connecting to the Past History Works

World War II : Documents World War II : Documents Agreement Between the Governments of the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the Provisional Government of the French Republic on Certain Additional Requirements to be Imposed on Germany; September 20, 1945 Agreement Between the United Kingdom and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics : July 12, 1941 Agreement for the Provisional Administration of Venezia Giulia; June 9, 1945 Agreement Relating to Prisoners of War and Civilians Liberated by Forces Operating Under Soviet Command and Forces Operating Under United States of America Command; February 11, 1945 Allied Control Commission in Hungary; January 20, 1945 Anglo-American Mutual Aid Agreement : February 28, 1942 Armistice Agreement with Bulgaria; October 28, 1944 Armistice Agreement with Hungary; January 20, 1945 Armistice Agreement with Italy; September 1943 Armistice Agreement with Rumania; September 12, 1944 Atlantic Charter British War Blue Book F.

Courses / Social Studies 1st Grade Social Studies In first grade, students develop their understanding of basic concepts and ideas from civics, economics, geography, and history. The context for social studies learning in first grade is the family and the ways they choose to live and work together. Power Standards for 1st Grade 2nd Grade Social Studies In second grade, students apply their emerging understanding of civics, economics, geography, and history to their communities and others around the world. Power Standards for 2nd Grade 3rd Grade Social Studies In third grade, students begin to explore more complex concepts and ideas from civics, economics, geography, and history as they study the varied backgrounds of people living in Washington and the rest of the United States. Power Standards for 3rd Grade 4th Grade Social Studies In fourth grade, students use their understanding of social studies concepts and skills to explore Washington State in the past and present. Power Standards for 4th Grade

Recollections of WWII - Home Page US History Websites with the Common Core Forty-five states have implemented the Common Core State Standards in ELA and Mathematics for every subject. These standards are not intended to drive history and other subjects away from the curriculum, but they are designed to encourage our students to be critical readers who can apply the knowledge they learned. These standards are intended to engage students in the history curriculum and teach them skills needed to be successful. The websites listed below are useful to supplement the curriculum and teach students the skills needed to be successful 21st century learners. Under Common Core Student’s will be encouraged to: Examine and analyze primary sourcesUse evidence to support an argumentUnderstand historical contextRead multiple accounts and perspectivesQuestion: Who? Websites: Docs Teach: This website is a wonderful resource that has over Four Thousand primary documents from the National Archives.

HyperWar: World War II on the World Wide Web The content of HyperWar consists primarily of official documents produced by various agencies of the United States, United Kingdom and British Commonwealth governments. All documents produced by the U.S. government are "born" in the public domain (free of copyright restrictions). Documents produced by the U.K. and Commonwealth governments are protected by Crown Copyright, however, Her Majesty graciously permits reproduction 50 years after publication provided only that an acknowledgment of the Crown's copyright is included. Original (non-government) content, created by HyperWar or contributed from the public, are offered without restrictions for personal or educational uses. For commercial use of the material please contact us. --HyperWar

Understanding Primary Sources: Benjamin Banneker's Letter to Thomas Jefferson Houghton Mifflin Social StudiesAmerica Will Be Understanding Primary Sources: Benjamin Banneker's Letter to Thomas Jefferson Objective: Students read and analyze excerpts from a letter from scientist Benjamin Banneker to Thomas Jefferson challenging Jefferson's view of African Americans. Students will write letters on the subject in their own words. What You Need: Suggested Time: 2-4 hours over 2-3 days Building Background: Remind students that in the late 1700s and early 1800s, about one-eighth of all African Americans in the United States were free. What To Do: 1. Benjamin Banneker to the secretary of state The complete text of the letter is available online from the University of Virginia, as well as images of the original handwritten letter. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Wrap-Up: Discuss with students the main ideas in Banneker's letter to Jefferson. Extension: Have students analyze Thomas Jefferson's short reply to Benjamin Banneker's letter.

Patriot Day is celebrated today on the anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 2001. Grades 3 – 5 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Wartime Poetry: Working With Similes Students analyze a photograph, brainstorm words to describe the characters' senses and feelings, work in pairs to describe a character's experience, and create a poem using their ideas and similes. Grades 6 – 8 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Heroes Around Us Students select, read about, and report on a hero and then identify how their hero matches certain criteria and characteristics. Inquiry on the Internet: Evaluating Web Pages for a Class Collection Students use Internet search engines and Web analysis checklists to evaluate online resources then write annotations that explain how and why the resources will be valuable to the class. Grades 8 – 12 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Responding to Tragedy: Then and Now

US History Websites with the Common Core Forty-five states have implemented the Common Core State Standards in ELA and Mathematics for every subject. These standards are not intended to drive history and other subjects away from the curriculum, but they are designed to encourage our students to be critical readers who can apply the knowledge they learned. These standards are intended to engage students in the history curriculum and teach them skills needed to be successful. The websites listed below are useful to supplement the curriculum and teach students the skills needed to be successful 21st century learners. Under Common Core Student’s will be encouraged to: Examine and analyze primary sourcesUse evidence to support an argumentUnderstand historical contextRead multiple accounts and perspectivesQuestion: Who? Websites: Docs Teach: This website is a wonderful resource that has over Four Thousand primary documents from the National Archives.

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