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MIT Visualizing Cultures

MIT Visualizing Cultures
Visualizing Cultures was launched at MIT in 2002 to explore the potential of the Web for developing innovative image-driven scholarship and learning. The VC mission is to use new technology and hitherto inaccessible visual materials to reconstruct the past as people of the time visualized the world (or imagined it to be). Topical units to date focus on Japan in the modern world and early-modern China. The thrust of these explorations extends beyond Asia per se, however, to address "culture" in much broader ways—cultures of modernization, war and peace, consumerism, images of "Self" and "Others," and so on.

http://ocw.mit.edu/ans7870/21f/21f.027/home/index.html

Related:  Cultures and GeographyHistory and Social StudiesChina

Bible Maps, Timelines, Charts, Lineages The Lost Tribes of Israel Locations where Israel taken captive View Migration after captivity View Israel's first settlement in Europe View The Roman Empire Free History and Geography Printables Welcome to Day Four of iHomeschool Network’s Print-a-Palooza, an extravaganza that will no doubt require you to stock up on printer ink! Please enjoy this collection of free history and geography printables from bloggers all around the world. Feel free to linkup your own printables! Coming Thursday: science printables Linkup requirements:

Zheng He's Voyages of Discovery, UCLA International Institute Noted oceanic scientist Jin Wu discusses the 15th century expeditions of the Chinese mariner Zheng He & the celebration of the 600th anniversary of his first voyage By Richard Gunde Published: Tuesday, April 20, 2004 What Zheng He accomplished, Jin Wu declared, must be considered an achievement for all of mankind, not just a Chinese achievement. On April 12 Jin Wu, distinguished oceanic scientist and former Minister of Education of the Republic of China (on Taiwan), discussed Zheng He's voyages of discovery and the upcoming celebrations of the 600th anniversary of his first voyage. In his talk, Professor Wu emphasized that, especially since the documentary record surrounding Zheng He (sometimes written Cheng Ho; 1371-1435) and his voyages is so thin, oceanic scientists and engineers and other physical scientists can provide important insights to supplement the work of historians.

6 Sites To Get Kids Excited About Google Maps I can remember three distinct occasions in my life where I have been blown away by technology. I will save the first two for another day, but I will say that the amazing experience of walking the streets of New York, from my computer on the other side of the world in Australia is definitely one of them. That feeling of disbelief where you wonder if it is another April 1st prank… What, they actually drove a little car all around the city taking photos???

The Best Sites That Show Statistics By Reducing The World & The U.S. To 100 People Reducing statistics to “if _________ were 100 people, then __________” can make them very accessible, engaging, and thought-provoking. For example, there’s the well-known “If Twitter Was 100 People” infographic. There are also several sites that use “gimmick” to illustrate much more important data about the world around us. I thought they might make a useful “The Best…” list for English Language Learners and others. Here are my choices for The Best Sites That Show Statistics By Reducing The World & The U.S. To 100 People:

IfItWereMyHome.com Canada A land of vast distances and rich natural resources, Canada became a self-governing dominion in 1867 while retaining ties to the British crown. Economically and technologically the nation has developed in parallel with the US, its neighbor to the south across an unfortified border. Drive Thru History iTBN Home Filter by: None None Classics Documentaries Educational Family & Variety Health & Fitness Holidays Kids Movies Music Reality Specials Teens Ancient Chinese Explorers By Evan Hadingham Posted 01.16.01 NOVA In 1999, New York Times journalist Nicholas D. Kristof reported a surprising encounter on a tiny African island called Pate, just off the coast of Kenya. Here, in a village of stone huts set amongst dense mangrove trees, Kristof met a number of elderly men who told him that they were descendants of Chinese sailors, shipwrecked on Pate many centuries ago. Their ancestors had traded with the local Africans, who had given them giraffes to take back to China; then their boat was driven onto the nearby reef.

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