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Theosophy

Theosophy
Theosophy (from Greek θεοσοφία theosophia, from θεός theos, God[1] + σοφία sophia, wisdom; literally "God's wisdom"), refers to systems of esoteric philosophy concerning, or investigation seeking direct knowledge of, presumed mysteries of being and nature, particularly concerning the nature of divinity. Theosophy is considered a part of the broader field of esotericism, referring to hidden knowledge or wisdom that offers the individual enlightenment and salvation. "The English word esoteric is derived from the Greek word esōterikos, which is attested in ii AD in the writing of Galenus Medicus." [2] [3] The theosophist seeks to understand the mysteries of the universe and the bonds that unite the universe, humanity, and the divine. The goal of theosophy is to explore the origin of divinity and humanity, and the world. From investigation of those topics, theosophists try to discover a coherent description of the purpose and origin of the universe. Etymology[edit] History[edit] Esotericism:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theosophy

Related:  SpiritualitySpirituality

Spiritism Allan Kardec, The Codifier of Spiritism Spiritism is a doctrine codified in the 19th century by the French educator Allan Kardec. Spiritism soon spread to other countries, having today 35 countries represented in the International Spiritist Council.[1] Higher consciousness Higher consciousness is the consciousness of a higher Self, transcendental reality, or God. It is "the part of the human being that is capable of transcending animal instincts". The concept developed in German Idealism, and is a central notion in contemporary popular spirituality. Philosophy[edit] Fichte[edit] Fichte distinguished the finite or empirical ego from the pure or infinite ego.

Occult theories about Francis Bacon Secret societies[edit] Francis Bacon often gathered with the men at Gray's Inn to discuss politics and philosophy, and to try out various theatrical scenes that he admitted writing.[1] Bacon's alleged connection to the Rosicrucians and the Freemasons has been widely discussed by authors and scholars in many books.[2] However others, including Daphne du Maurier (in her biography of Bacon), have argued there is no substantive evidence to support claims of involvement with the Rosicrucians.[3] Historian Dame Frances Yates[4] does not make the claim that Bacon was a Rosicrucian, but presents evidence that he was nevertheless involved in some of the more closed intellectual movements of his day. She argues that Bacon's movement for the advancement of learning was closely connected with the German Rosicrucian movement, while Bacon's The New Atlantis portrays a land ruled by Rosicrucians. In 1618 Francis Bacon decided to secure a lease for York House. Faked death theory[edit]

H.P. Blavatsky Articles and quotes HPB, as Helena Petrovna Blavatsky is often called, is a giant in the history of Western Occultism and the history of 19th century eastern religion. She, through her writings and her contributions to the Theosophical Society, brought eastern concepts like karma and reincarnation to the West. She was also instrumental in helping people in Asia appreciate their own religions more. Olcott did a lot of the heavy lifting, but Madame Blavatsky's contribution can't be ignored.

Jnana Jnana or gnana or gnaan (Sanskrit; Pali: jñāna) is a Sanskrit word that means knowledge. It has various nuances of meaning depending on the context, and is used in a number of different Indian religions. The idea of jnana centers around a cognitive event which is recognized when experienced.[1] It is knowledge inseparable from the total experience of reality, especially a total reality,[1] or supreme being within Mahesha-dhama (and/or material world) such as Siva-Sakti.[2] Absence of jnana (knowledge, gnosticism) is known as ajnana (see: agnosticism): Famous mantra in this relationship says: "Om ajnana timirandhasya..." (I was born in ajnana, agnosticism, but my spiritual master opened my eyes with fire of transcendental knowledge, jnana).

Anima mundi Therefore, we may consequently state that: this world is indeed a living being endowed with a soul and intelligence ... a single visible living entity containing all other living entities, which by their nature are all related.[1] Other resemblances can be found in the thoughts of hermetic philosophers like Paracelsus, and by Baruch Spinoza, Gottfried Leibniz, Friedrich Schelling and in Hegel's Geist ("Spirit"/"Mind"). There are also similarities with ideas developed since the 1960s by Gaia theorists such as James Lovelock. See also[edit] References[edit]

Helena Blavatsky Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (Russian: Еле́на Петро́вна Блава́тская, Ukrainian: Олена Петрівна Блаватська), born as Helena von Hahn (Russian: Елена Петровна Ган, Ukrainian: Олена Петрівна Ган; 12 August [O.S. 31 July] 1831 – 8 May 1891), was a Russian occultist.[1] In 1875, Blavatsky, Henry Steel Olcott, and William Quan Judge established a research and publishing institute called the Theosophical Society. Blavatsky defined Theosophy as "the archaic Wisdom-Religion, the esoteric doctrine once known in every ancient country having claims to civilization. The Ocean of Theosophy by William Q. Judge (TUP Edition) Theosophical University Press Online Edition By William Q. Judge

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