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Scientists Identify Gene Required for Nerve Regeneration

Scientists Identify Gene Required for Nerve Regeneration
A gene that is associated with regeneration of injured nerve cells has been identified by a team of researchers led by Prof Melissa Rolls of Penn State University. In fruit flies with two normal copies of the spastin gene, a team of scientists led by Prof Melissa Rolls of Penn State University found that severed axons were able to regenerate. However, in fruit flies with two or even only one abnormal spastin gene, the severed axons were not able to regenerate (Melissa Rolls / Penn State University) The team has found that a mutation in a single gene can entirely shut down the process by which axons – the parts of the nerve cell that are responsible for sending signals to other cells – regrow themselves after being cut or damaged. “We are hopeful that this discovery will open the door to new research related to spinal-cord and other neurological disorders in humans,” said Prof Rolls, who co-authored a paper published online in the journal Cell Reports. Related:  science and beyondPhysiology & GeneticsMedical Science

New wonder drug matches and kills all kinds of cancer — human testing starts 2014 Stanford researchers are on track to begin human trials of a potentially potent new weapon against cancer, and would-be participants are flooding in following the Post’s initial report on the discovery. The progress comes just two months after the groundbreaking study by Dr Irv Weissman, who developed an antibody that breaks down a cancer’s defense mechanisms in the body. A protein called CD47 tells the body not to “eat” the cancer, but the antibody developed by Dr Weissman blocks CD47 and frees up immune cells called macrophages — which can then engulf the deadly cells. The new research shows the miraculous macrophages effectively act as intelligence gatherers for the body, pointing out cancerous cells to cancer-fighting “killer T” cells. The T cells then “learn” to hunt down and attack the cancer, the researchers claim. The clinical implications of the process could be profound in the war on cancer. This turns them into a personalized cancer vaccine.

Antibiotics resistance 'as big a risk as terrorism' - medical chief 11 March 2013Last updated at 09:36 ET By Fergus Walsh Medical correspondent Professor Dame Sally Davies: "If you get an infection in your bloodstream, in about 10, 20 years it might be untreatable" The danger posed by growing resistance to antibiotics should be ranked along with terrorism on a list of threats to the nation, the government's chief medical officer for England has said. Professor Dame Sally Davies described it as a "ticking time bomb". She warned that routine operations could become deadly in just 20 years if we lose the ability to fight infection. Dame Sally urged the government to raise the issue during next month's G8 Summit in London. Continue reading the main story Antimicrobial resistance Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat. It happens when organisms are able to survive medicines aimed to destroy them. Bacteria can become resistant to antibiotics, viruses to antivirals and parasites to drugs like antimalarials. Continue reading the main story Your stories

Magnesium, Iodine and Sodium Bicarbonate by Mark Sircus Ac., OMD International Medical Veritas Association Edited by danreid.org Number One: Magnesium Chloride Magnesium chloride occupies the number one slot in all our protocols. I continue to receive testimonies that justify its placement as the most needed and useful medicinal substance in the world. I have been on a medication called Baclofen for severe muscle spasms. Just this morning I was reading one of David Brownstein's wonderful books called Salt Your Way To Health and discovered that the chloride in salt helps the kidneys to clear or detoxify the body of bromide, which is a potent poison that is stupidly used in both medicines and foods, especially the white bread you buy from a store. Number Two: Iodine Iodine occupies the number two spot in the IMVA protocol for cancer, infections, and a host of other acute and chronic clinical situations. We also need iodine for our immune system to work properly.

Effect of parity on fetal and maternal microchimerism: interaction of grafts within a host? | Blood | American Society of Hematology Individuals harbor small amounts of foreign cells or DNA, referred to as microchimerism (Mc). Acquisition of Mc naturally occurs primarily during pregnancy, through transplacental cell trafficking between mother and fetus. An adult woman acquired Mc from her own mother (maternal Mc, or MMc) when she herself was a fetus. This “graft,” acquired during fetal immune system development, can remain in her system into adulthood1 and represents a pre-existing inhabitant as she experiences pregnancy herself. During subsequent pregnancies, new fetal sources of microchimerism (fetal Mc, or FMc) are acquired. As a therapeutic parallel to this natural process, the arena of stem cell transplantation can provide some insights into the host response to Mc and the interaction between acquired grafts. We asked whether there is a relationship between increasing parity and the prevalence of Mc. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from all probands (primary participants). Table 2 Figure 1 Table 3 Figure 2

UCI, fellow chemists find a way to unboil eggs Irvine, Calif., Jan. 23, 2015 – UC Irvine and Australian chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites – an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to findings published today in the journal ChemBioChem. “Yes, we have invented a way to unboil a hen egg,” said Gregory Weiss, UCI professor of chemistry and molecular biology & biochemistry. “In our paper, we describe a device for pulling apart tangled proteins and allowing them to refold. We start with egg whites boiled for 20 minutes at 90 degrees Celsius and return a key protein in the egg to working order.” Like many researchers, he has struggled to efficiently produce or recycle valuable molecular proteins that have a wide range of applications but which frequently “misfold” into structurally incorrect shapes when they are formed, rendering them useless.

Getting stem cells from urine Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been generated with varied efficiencies from multiple tissues. Yet, acquiring donor cells is, in most instances, an invasive procedure that requires laborious isolation. Here we present a detailed protocol for generating human iPSCs from exfoliated renal epithelial cells present in urine. View full text Figures Human Cells have Electric Fields as Powerful as Lighting Bolts -A Galaxy Insight Using newly developed voltage-sensitive nanoparticles, researchers have found that the previously unknown electric fields inside of cells are as strong, or stronger, as those produced in lightning bolts. Previously, it has only been possible to measure electric fields across cell membranes, not within the main bulk of cells, so scientists didn't even know cells had an internal electric field. This discovery is a surprising twist for cell researchers. Scientists don't know what causes these incredibly strong fields or why they' are there. But now using new nanotools, such as voltage-sensitive dyes, they can start to measure them at least. Researchers believe they may be able to learn more about disease states, such as cancer, by studying these minute, but powerful electric fields. University of Michigan researchers led by chemistry professor Raoul Kopelman encapsulated voltage-sensitive dyes in polymer spheres just 30 nanometers in diameter. Posted by Rebecca Sato Related Galaxy posts:

Only a tiny fraction of our DNA is uniquely human The genetic tweaks that make humans uniquely human may come in small parcels interspersed with DNA inherited from extinct ancestors and cousins. Only 1.5 percent to 7 percent of the collective human genetic instruction book, or genome, contains uniquely human DNA, researchers report July 16 in Science Advances. That humans-only DNA, scattered throughout the genome, tends to contain genes involved in brain development and function, hinting that brain evolution was important in making humans human. But the researchers don’t yet know exactly what the genes do and how the exclusively human tweaks to DNA near those genes may have affected brain evolution. “I don’t know if we’ll ever be able to say what makes us uniquely human,” says Emilia Huerta-Sanchez, a population geneticist at Brown University in Providence, R.I., who was not involved in the study. “We don’t know whether that makes us think in a specific way or have specific behaviors.” Sign Up For the Latest from Science News

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