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World’s First Perpetual Motion Machine?

World’s First Perpetual Motion Machine?
Can this machine operate forever? Since at least the 12th century, man has sought to create a perpetual motion machine; a device that would continue working indefinitely without any external source of energy. A large scientific contingent thinks such a device would violate the laws of thermodynamics, and is thus impossible. Could it be that as a race, we don’t fully understand the laws of physics and such a device may indeed be possible? What would the ramifications be if we could actually build a perpetually moving device? Norwegian artist and mathematician Reidar Finsrud is an outside the box thinker that has devised a machine that he believes achieves true perpetual motion. The dream is that if we’re able to produce perpetual motion machines, that we’d have tapped into the holy grail of sustainability: an infinite energy source. A device that requires no input to run that could be affixed to a generator would harvest free energy to power whatever we so pleased. What are your thoughts?

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An Idiot's Guide to Teleportation » SciFi Ideas / SciFi Ideas With contributor Harel Dor recently sharing with SciFi Ideas a story idea that makes full use of teleportation technology – Meet the Beamies – I thought it was high time we discussed teleportation in detail. Teleportation is one of science fiction’s most fascinating and useful ideas, being both a cool gadget and a clever narrative device; however, with lots of talk about quantum entanglement, ideas about how teleportation might actually be achieved can also be very complex. To help you understand what the science geeks are talking about and dispel some of the myths about the reality of teleportation, here’s an idiot’s guide to what this word actually means.

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